Macromolecular Self-Assembly

 
 
John Wiley & Sons Inc (Verlag)
  • erschienen am 10. August 2016
  • |
  • 272 Seiten
 
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-1-118-88784-4 (ISBN)
 
This book describes techniques of synthesis and self-assembly of macromolecules for developing new materials and improving functionality of existing ones. Because self-assembly emulates how nature creates complex systems, they likely have the best chance at succeeding in real-world biomedical applications.
* Employs synthetic chemistry, physical chemistry, and materials science principles and techniques
* Emphasizes self-assembly in solutions (particularly, aqueous solutions) and at solid-liquid interfaces
* Describes polymer assembly driven by multitude interactions, including solvophobic, electrostatic, and obligatory co-assembly
* Illustrates assembly of bio-hybrid macromolecules and applications in biomedical engineering
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
Laurent Billon, PhD, is Professor at Pau University (France) and leader of the polymer group at the Interdisciplinary Institute of Environmental and Material Research (IPREM) in Pau, France. He is the author of over 90 scientific publications and 12 patents. He received his PhD in Polymer Chemistry from Pau University.Oleg Borisov, PhD, is research director at the Institute of Environmental and Material Research at Pau University, France. He received his PhD in physics and mechanics of polymers in the Institute of Macromolecular Compounds of the Russian Academy of Sciences. He is the author of over 150 scientific publications and received the Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel Research Award (2004) from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation.
1 - Cover [Seite 1]
2 - Title Page [Seite 3]
3 - Copyright [Seite 4]
4 - Contents [Seite 5]
5 - List of Contributors [Seite 9]
6 - Preface [Seite 13]
7 - Chapter 1 A Supramolecular Approach to Macromolecular Self-Assembly: Cyclodextrin Host/Guest Complexes [Seite 17]
7.1 - 1.1 Introduction [Seite 17]
7.2 - 1.2 Synthetic Approaches to Host/Guest Functionalized Building Blocks [Seite 19]
7.2.1 - 1.2.1 CD Functionalization [Seite 19]
7.2.2 - 1.2.2 Suitable Guest Groups [Seite 21]
7.3 - 1.3 Supramolecular CD Self-Assemblies [Seite 23]
7.3.1 - 1.3.1 Linear Polymers [Seite 23]
7.3.2 - 1.3.2 Branched Polymers [Seite 28]
7.3.3 - 1.3.3 Cyclic Polymer Architectures [Seite 33]
7.4 - 1.4 Higher Order Assemblies of CD-Based Polymer Architectures Toward Nanostructures [Seite 33]
7.4.1 - 1.4.1 Micelles/Core-Shell Particles [Seite 33]
7.4.2 - 1.4.2 Vesicles [Seite 35]
7.4.3 - 1.4.3 Nanotubes and Fibers [Seite 36]
7.4.4 - 1.4.4 Nanoparticles and Hybrid Materials [Seite 37]
7.4.5 - 1.4.5 Planar Surface Modification [Seite 38]
7.5 - 1.5 Applications [Seite 39]
7.6 - 1.6 Conclusion and Outlook [Seite 42]
7.7 - References [Seite 42]
8 - Chapter 2 Polymerization-Induced Self-Assembly: The Contribution of Controlled Radical Polymerization to The Formation of Self-Stabilized Polymer Particles of Various Morphologies [Seite 49]
8.1 - 2.1 Introduction [Seite 49]
8.2 - 2.2 Preliminary Comments Underlying Controlled Radical Polymerization [Seite 52]
8.2.1 - 2.2.1 Introduction [Seite 52]
8.2.2 - 2.2.2 Major Methods Based on a Reversible Termination Mechanism [Seite 53]
8.2.3 - 2.2.3 Major Methods Based on a Reversible Transfer Mechanism [Seite 55]
8.3 - 2.3 Pisa Via CRP Based on Reversible Termination [Seite 56]
8.3.1 - 2.3.1 PISA Using NMP [Seite 56]
8.3.2 - 2.3.2 Using ATRP [Seite 62]
8.4 - 2.4 Pisa Via CRP Based on Reversible Transfer [Seite 64]
8.4.1 - 2.4.1 Using RAFT in Emulsion Polymerization [Seite 64]
8.4.2 - 2.4.2 Using RAFT in Dispersion Polymerization [Seite 77]
8.4.3 - 2.4.3 Using TERP [Seite 86]
8.5 - 2.5 Concluding Remarks [Seite 87]
8.6 - Acknowledgments [Seite 89]
8.7 - Abbreviations [Seite 89]
8.8 - References [Seite 91]
9 - Chapter 3 Amphiphilic Gradient Copolymers: Synthesis and Self-Assembly in Aqueous Solution [Seite 99]
9.1 - 3.1 Introduction [Seite 99]
9.2 - 3.2 Synthetic Strategies for The Preparation of Gradient Copolymers [Seite 102]
9.2.1 - 3.2.1 Preparation of Gradient Copolymers by Controlled Radical Copolymerization [Seite 103]
9.2.2 - 3.2.2 Preparation of Block-Gradient Copolymers Using Controlled Radical Polymerization [Seite 122]
9.3 - 3.3 Self-Assembly [Seite 126]
9.3.1 - 3.3.1 Gradient Copolymers [Seite 126]
9.3.2 - 3.3.2 Diblock-Gradient Copolymers [Seite 127]
9.3.3 - 3.3.3 Triblock-Gradient Copolymers [Seite 129]
9.4 - 3.4 Conclusion and Outlook [Seite 130]
9.5 - Abbreviations [Seite 131]
9.6 - References [Seite 133]
10 - Chapter 4 Electrostatically Assembled Complex Macromolecular Architectures Based on Star-Like Polyionic Species [Seite 141]
10.1 - 4.1 Introduction [Seite 141]
10.2 - 4.2 Core-Corona Co-Assemblies of Homopolyelectrolyte Stars Complexed with Linear Polyions [Seite 143]
10.3 - 4.3 Core-Shell-Corona Co-Assemblies of Star-Like Micelles of Ionic Amphiphilic Diblock Copolymers Complexed with Linear Polyions [Seite 146]
10.4 - 4.4 Vesicular Co-Assemblies of Bis-Hydrophilic Miktoarm Stars Complexed with Linear Polyions [Seite 149]
10.5 - 4.5 Conclusions [Seite 153]
10.6 - Acknowledgment [Seite 153]
10.7 - References [Seite 153]
11 - Chapter 5 Solution Properties of Associating Polymers [Seite 157]
11.1 - 5.1 Introduction [Seite 157]
11.2 - 5.2 Structures of Associating Polyelectrolytes [Seite 158]
11.3 - 5.3 Associating Polyelectrolytes in Dilute Solutions [Seite 158]
11.3.1 - 5.3.1 Intramolecular Association [Seite 161]
11.3.2 - 5.3.2 Intermolecular Association [Seite 163]
11.4 - 5.4 Associating Polyelectrolytes in Semidilute Solutions [Seite 167]
11.5 - 5.5 Conclusions [Seite 171]
11.6 - References [Seite 171]
12 - Chapter 6 Macromolecular Decoration of Nanoparticles for Guiding Self-Assembly in 2D and 3D [Seite 175]
12.1 - 6.1 Introduction [Seite 175]
12.2 - 6.2 Guiding Assembly by Decoration with Artificial Macromolecules [Seite 176]
12.2.1 - 6.2.1 Decoration of Nanoparticles [Seite 177]
12.2.2 - 6.2.2 Distance Control in 2D and 3D [Seite 182]
12.2.3 - 6.2.3 Breaking the Symmetry [Seite 187]
12.3 - 6.3 Guiding Assembly by Decoration with Biomacromolecules [Seite 189]
12.3.1 - 6.3.1 DNA-Assisted Assembly [Seite 189]
12.3.2 - 6.3.2 Protein-Assisted Assembly [Seite 193]
12.4 - 6.4 Application of Assemblies [Seite 197]
12.5 - 6.5 Conclusions and Outlook [Seite 199]
12.6 - References [Seite 200]
13 - Chapter 7 Self-Assembly of Biohybrid Polymers [Seite 209]
13.1 - 7.1 Introduction [Seite 209]
13.1.1 - 7.1.1 Amphiphiles [Seite 210]
13.1.2 - 7.1.2 Packing Parameter and Interfacial Tension [Seite 211]
13.1.3 - 7.1.3 Interaction Forces in Self-Assembly [Seite 212]
13.2 - 7.2 Self-Assembly of Biohybrid Polymers [Seite 214]
13.2.1 - 7.2.1 Polymer-DNA Hybrids [Seite 214]
13.2.2 - 7.2.2 Polypeptide Block Copolymers [Seite 220]
13.2.3 - 7.2.3 Block Copolypeptides [Seite 221]
13.3 - 7.3 Self-Assembly Driven Nucleation Polymerization [Seite 223]
13.3.1 - 7.3.1 Polymer-DNA Hybrids [Seite 225]
13.3.2 - 7.3.2 Polymer-Peptide Hybrids [Seite 225]
13.3.3 - 7.3.3 DNA-Peptide Hybrids [Seite 228]
13.4 - 7.4 Self-Assembly Driven by Electrostatic Interactions [Seite 229]
13.4.1 - 7.4.1 DNA/Polymer Bio-IPECs [Seite 232]
13.4.2 - 7.4.2 DNA/Copolymer Bio-IPECs [Seite 232]
13.5 - 7.5 Conclusion [Seite 234]
13.6 - References [Seite 235]
14 - Chapter 8 Biomedical Application of Block Copolymers [Seite 247]
14.1 - 8.1 Introduction [Seite 247]
14.2 - 8.2 Diblock and Triblock Copolymers [Seite 250]
14.3 - 8.3 Graft and Statistical Copolymers [Seite 256]
14.4 - 8.4 Concluding Remarks [Seite 261]
14.5 - Acknowledgment [Seite 261]
14.6 - References [Seite 261]
15 - Index [Seite 267]
16 - EULA [Seite 275]

Dateiformat: PDF
Kopierschutz: Adobe-DRM (Digital Rights Management)

Systemvoraussetzungen:

Computer (Windows; MacOS X; Linux): Installieren Sie bereits vor dem Download die kostenlose Software Adobe Digital Editions (siehe E-Book Hilfe).

Tablet/Smartphone (Android; iOS): Installieren Sie bereits vor dem Download die kostenlose App Adobe Digital Editions (siehe E-Book Hilfe).

E-Book-Reader: Bookeen, Kobo, Pocketbook, Sony, Tolino u.v.a.m. (nicht Kindle)

Das Dateiformat PDF zeigt auf jeder Hardware eine Buchseite stets identisch an. Daher ist eine PDF auch für ein komplexes Layout geeignet, wie es bei Lehr- und Fachbüchern verwendet wird (Bilder, Tabellen, Spalten, Fußnoten). Bei kleinen Displays von E-Readern oder Smartphones sind PDF leider eher nervig, weil zu viel Scrollen notwendig ist. Mit Adobe-DRM wird hier ein "harter" Kopierschutz verwendet. Wenn die notwendigen Voraussetzungen nicht vorliegen, können Sie das E-Book leider nicht öffnen. Daher müssen Sie bereits vor dem Download Ihre Lese-Hardware vorbereiten.

Weitere Informationen finden Sie in unserer E-Book Hilfe.


Download (sofort verfügbar)

129,99 €
inkl. 19% MwSt.
Download / Einzel-Lizenz
PDF mit Adobe DRM
siehe Systemvoraussetzungen
E-Book bestellen

Unsere Web-Seiten verwenden Cookies. Mit der Nutzung dieser Web-Seiten erklären Sie sich damit einverstanden. Mehr Informationen finden Sie in unserem Datenschutzhinweis. Ok