Sustainability Challenges in the Agrofood Sector

 
 
Standards Information Network (Verlag)
  • erschienen am 8. Februar 2017
  • |
  • 712 Seiten
 
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe-DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-1-119-07274-4 (ISBN)
 
Sustainability Challenges in the Agrofood Sector covers a wide range of agrofood-related concerns, including urban and rural agriculture and livelihoods, water-energy management, food and environmental policies, diet and human health. Significant and relevant research topics highlighting the most recent updates will be covered, with contributions from leading experts currently based in academia, government bodies and NGOs (see list of contributors below). Chapters will address the realities of sustainable agrofood, the issues and challenges at stake, and will propose and discuss novel approaches to these issues. This book will be the most up-to-date and complete work yet published on the topic, with new and hot topics covered as well as the core aspects and challenges of agrofood sustainability.
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
About the Editor
Dr Rajeev Bhat is currently working as Associate Professor and Head of Food Science Department at the Fiji National University, Fiji Islands. Dr Bhat has nearly 17 years of research experience, gained by working in India, South Korea, Malaysia and Germany.His major theme of research revolves around food security, food safety and sustainable food production.
1 - Title Page [Seite 5]
2 - Copyright Page [Seite 6]
3 - Contents [Seite 7]
4 - List of Contributors [Seite 10]
5 - Foreword [Seite 15]
6 - Preface [Seite 18]
7 - Introductory Note: Future of Agrofood Sustainability [Seite 20]
8 - Chapter 1 Food Sustainability Challenges in the Developing World [Seite 23]
8.1 - 1.1 Introduction [Seite 23]
8.2 - 1.2 Agriculture and the Food Sustainability Sector [Seite 24]
8.2.1 - 1.2.1 Biodiversity and Agriculture [Seite 27]
8.2.2 - 1.2.2 Agricultural Development [Seite 28]
8.2.3 - 1.2.3 Agriculture: Pests and Rodents [Seite 29]
8.2.4 - 1.2.4 Agriculture and Organic Farming [Seite 30]
8.2.5 - 1.2.5 Livestock, Poultry and Aquaculture [Seite 31]
8.3 - 1.3 Food Security and the Developing World [Seite 33]
8.3.1 - 1.3.1 Poverty, Hidden Hunger and Diseases [Seite 35]
8.3.2 - 1.3.2 Emerging Diseases [Seite 36]
8.3.3 - 1.3.3 Stability of Food Supply and Access to Safe, High-quality Foods [Seite 37]
8.3.4 - 1.3.4 Food Diversification [Seite 38]
8.3.5 - 1.3.5 Health (dietary) Supplements [Seite 39]
8.3.6 - 1.3.6 Food Wastage [Seite 39]
8.3.7 - 1.3.7 Food Safety [Seite 41]
8.3.8 - 1.3.8 Sustainability Challenges in the Food Industry [Seite 41]
8.4 - 1.4 Conclusions and Future Outlook [Seite 42]
8.5 - References [Seite 44]
9 - Chapter 2 The Role of Small-scale Farms and Food Security [Seite 55]
9.1 - 2.1 Introduction [Seite 55]
9.2 - 2.2 The Elusive Search for Sustainability [Seite 56]
9.3 - 2.3 Food Security, the Bio-economy and Sustainable Intensification [Seite 58]
9.4 - 2.4 Global Land Grabs or Agricultural Investment? [Seite 61]
9.5 - 2.5 Farm Succession [Seite 63]
9.6 - 2.6 Conclusions and Future Outlook [Seite 65]
9.7 - References [Seite 67]
10 - Chapter 3 Sustainability Challenges, Human Diet and Environmental Concerns [Seite 70]
10.1 - 3.1 Introduction [Seite 70]
10.2 - 3.2 The Current State of the World Food System [Seite 73]
10.3 - 3.3 Health and Diet [Seite 74]
10.4 - 3.4 What is Stopping People from Consuming 'Healthy' Food [Seite 75]
10.5 - 3.5 The Relationship between Diet and Environmental Impacts [Seite 76]
10.6 - 3.6 Animal Protein Consumption [Seite 79]
10.7 - 3.7 Methods of Environmental Impact Assessment [Seite 80]
10.8 - 3.8 Metrics of Environmental Impact Assessments [Seite 81]
10.9 - 3.9 Consumers' Understanding of Diet and the Environmental Impacts [Seite 83]
10.10 - 3.10 Interventions in Diet [Seite 83]
10.11 - 3.11 Conclusions and Future Outlook [Seite 85]
10.12 - Acknowledgements [Seite 85]
10.13 - References [Seite 85]
11 - Chapter 4 Sustainable Challenges in the Agrofood Sector: The Environment Food-Energy-Water Nexus [Seite 100]
11.1 - 4.1 Introduction [Seite 100]
11.2 - 4.2 Challenges of Sustainability in the Agrofood System [Seite 101]
11.3 - 4.3 Food-Energy-Water Nexus [Seite 104]
11.4 - 4.4 Dynamics of Agricultural Productions [Seite 109]
11.5 - 4.5 Sustainable Agrofood Businesses: Supply-Chain Perspective [Seite 110]
11.5.1 - 4.5.1 Suppliers [Seite 110]
11.5.2 - 4.5.2 Producers [Seite 111]
11.5.3 - 4.5.3 Processors [Seite 111]
11.5.4 - 4.5.4 Transporters and Distributors [Seite 112]
11.5.5 - 4.5.5 Marketers and Sellers [Seite 112]
11.5.6 - 4.5.6 Consumers [Seite 112]
11.6 - 4.6 Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) [Seite 113]
11.7 - 4.7 Role of government in promoting sustainable development [Seite 113]
11.8 - 4.8 Transparency of information [Seite 117]
11.8.1 - 4.8.1 Barriers to Implementation [Seite 117]
11.9 - 4.9 Innovations in Agrofood Businesses [Seite 118]
11.9.1 - 4.9.1 Biological Catalysts [Seite 118]
11.9.2 - 4.9.2 Renewable Energy and Energy Conservation [Seite 118]
11.10 - 4.10 Food safety [Seite 119]
11.11 - 4.11 Food wastes [Seite 119]
11.12 - 4.12 Conclusions and future outlook [Seite 121]
11.13 - References [Seite 122]
12 - Chapter 5 Dynamics of Grain Security in South Asia: Promoting Sustainability through Self-sufficiency [Seite 125]
12.1 - 5.1 Introduction: Overview of the Grain Sector in South Asia [Seite 126]
12.2 - 5.2 Food security in India: From Green Revolution to trade revolution [Seite 129]
12.3 - 5.3 Involvement of WTO and its implications for Food Security [Seite 131]
12.4 - 5.4 Sustainability in Grain Production in South Asia: Can self-sufficiency be the key? [Seite 132]
12.5 - 5.5 Conclusions and Future Outlook [Seite 135]
12.6 - References [Seite 138]
13 - Chapter 6 Local Food Diversification and Its (Sustainability) Challenges [Seite 141]
13.1 - 6.1 Introduction [Seite 141]
13.2 - 6.2 Global challenges in food and Nutrition Security [Seite 142]
13.3 - 6.3 Nutritional Status and Health Implication in Asian Countries [Seite 146]
13.4 - 6.4 Changes in Diet Composition [Seite 149]
13.4.1 - 6.4.1 Early Diet Composition: Local Food Diet [Seite 149]
13.4.2 - 6.4.2 People Change their Diet Composition [Seite 149]
13.4.3 - 6.4.3 The Consequences of Changing Diet Composition [Seite 152]
13.5 - 6.5 Contributing Factors of Nutritional Status [Seite 153]
13.6 - 6.6 Local Food Diversification to Improve Nutritional Status and Community Welfare [Seite 156]
13.6.1 - 6.6.1 Local Food Production in the Region [Seite 156]
13.6.2 - 6.6.2 Local Food Consumption [Seite 158]
13.7 - 6.7 Local Food Diversification in Indonesia: A Case Example [Seite 159]
13.7.1 - 6.7.1 Staple Food in Indonesia [Seite 159]
13.7.2 - 6.7.2 Local Food Production [Seite 162]
13.8 - 6.8 The Importance of Food Diversification [Seite 163]
13.9 - 6.9 Local Food Diversity and Its Utilization for Staple and Functional Food [Seite 163]
13.10 - 6.10 Strategy for Food Diversification and Sustainability [Seite 165]
13.11 - 6.11 Conclusions and Future Outlook [Seite 165]
13.12 - References [Seite 166]
14 - Chapter 7 Sustainable Supply Chain Management in Agri-food Chains: A Competitive Factor for Food Exporters [Seite 172]
14.1 - 7.1 Introduction [Seite 172]
14.2 - 7.2 Sustainable Supply Chain Management as a Concept [Seite 174]
14.2.1 - 7.2.1 Dimensions of a Sustainable Food Chain [Seite 176]
14.2.2 - 7.2.2 How to Evaluate Sustainability within Supply Chain [Seite 176]
14.2.3 - 7.2.3 Traceability in Food Chains [Seite 178]
14.2.4 - 7.2.4 Labelling in Food Chains [Seite 179]
14.2.5 - 7.2.5 Country of Origin (COO) [Seite 182]
14.3 - 7.3 Food Quality and Safety Standards [Seite 184]
14.4 - 7.4 The Case: Seed potatoes from High Grade Area in Finland [Seite 185]
14.5 - 7.5 Case study: Exporting Organic Berry Products to Germany [Seite 186]
14.5.1 - 7.5.1 The Company [Seite 186]
14.5.2 - 7.5.2 The Overview from the Interviews [Seite 187]
14.5.3 - 7.5.3 Conclusions from the Case [Seite 190]
14.6 - 7.6 Conclusions and Future Outlook [Seite 191]
14.7 - References [Seite 192]
15 - Chapter 8 How Logistics Decisions Affect the Environmental Sustainability of Modern Food Supply Chains: A Case Study from an Italian Large-scale Retailer [Seite 197]
15.1 - 8.1 Introduction [Seite 197]
15.2 - 8.2 The Large-scale Retailer Distribution Network [Seite 200]
15.3 - 8.3 Assessing the Environmental Impacts [Seite 202]
15.3.1 - 8.3.1 The Frozen Products Network [Seite 202]
15.3.2 - 8.3.2 The Perishable Products Network [Seite 208]
15.3.3 - 8.3.3 The Dry Products Network [Seite 210]
15.3.4 - 8.3.4 Summary of the Comparison [Seite 214]
15.4 - 8.4 Conclusions and Future Outlook [Seite 217]
15.5 - Acknowledgements [Seite 217]
15.6 - References [Seite 217]
16 - Chapter 9 Strengthening Food Supply Chains in Asia: Challenges and Strategies [Seite 219]
16.1 - 9.1 Introduction [Seite 219]
16.2 - 9.2 Agriculture and Food Security Issues in Asia [Seite 220]
16.3 - 9.3 Agricultural Marketing in Asia [Seite 221]
16.3.1 - 9.3.1 Unorganized Food Supplies [Seite 222]
16.3.2 - 9.3.2 Post-harvest Losses [Seite 222]
16.3.3 - 9.3.3 Lack of Primary and Secondary Infrastructure [Seite 223]
16.3.4 - 9.3.4 Unorganized Markets [Seite 224]
16.3.5 - 9.3.5 Lack of Marketing Information and Intelligence [Seite 225]
16.4 - 9.4 Climate Change [Seite 226]
16.5 - 9.5 Agricultural Marketing: Lessons from India [Seite 226]
16.5.1 - 9.5.1 Food Supply Chain Challenges in India [Seite 227]
16.5.2 - 9.5.2 Agricultural Marketing Reforms [Seite 227]
16.6 - 9.6 Strategies to Strengthen Food Supply Chains [Seite 228]
16.6.1 - 9.6.1 Consumer Orientation [Seite 228]
16.6.2 - 9.6.2 Stakeholder Collaboration [Seite 228]
16.6.3 - 9.6.3 Development of Secondary Infrastructure [Seite 229]
16.6.4 - 9.6.4 Development of Roads and Transport Systems [Seite 229]
16.6.5 - 9.6.5 Use of Information and Communication Technologies [Seite 229]
16.6.6 - 9.6.6 Food Processing [Seite 230]
16.6.7 - 9.6.7 Creation of Alternative Markets [Seite 230]
16.7 - 9.7 Conclusions and Future Outlook [Seite 230]
17 - Chapter 10 Revolutionizing Food Supply Chains of Asia through ICTs [Seite 234]
17.1 - 10.1 Introduction [Seite 234]
17.2 - 10.2 Challenges Before Food Supply Chains in Asia [Seite 235]
17.3 - 10.3 Information as an Important Input for Farmers [Seite 236]
17.4 - 10.4 Information and Communication Technologies: A Promising Potential [Seite 237]
17.5 - 10.5 Revolutionizing Agriculture with ICTs [Seite 238]
17.6 - 10.6 Challenges [Seite 243]
17.7 - 10.7 Conclusions and Future Outlook [Seite 244]
17.8 - References [Seite 245]
18 - Chapter 11 Sustainability, Materiality and Independent External Assurance: An Exploratory Study of the UK's Leading Food Retailers [Seite 249]
18.1 - 11.1 Introduction [Seite 249]
18.2 - 11.2 Sustainability [Seite 250]
18.3 - 11.3 Materiality and External Assurance [Seite 252]
18.4 - 11.4 Food Retailing in the UK [Seite 256]
18.5 - 11.5 Frame of Reference and Method of Inquiry [Seite 257]
18.6 - 11.6 Findings: Sustainability [Seite 258]
18.7 - 11.7 Findings: Materiality [Seite 262]
18.8 - 11.8 Findings: External Assurance [Seite 264]
18.9 - 11.9 Discussion [Seite 266]
18.10 - 11.10 Conclusions and Future Outlook [Seite 271]
18.11 - References [Seite 273]
19 - Chapter 12 Environmental Sustainability of Traditional Crop Varieties: Reviewing Approaches and Key Issues for a Multilevel Evaluation [Seite 277]
19.1 - 12.1 Introduction [Seite 277]
19.2 - 12.2 Crop Varieties, Cultivars or Landraces? [Seite 278]
19.3 - 12.3 Environmental Outreaches in Growing Traditional Cultivars [Seite 280]
19.4 - 12.4 Argument One: Biodiversity as Base for Sustainability [Seite 283]
19.4.1 - 12.4.1 Representative Case Study: Banana and Plantain in Uganda [Seite 283]
19.5 - 12.5 Argument Two: Better Environmental Performance [Seite 284]
19.5.1 - 12.5.1 Representative Case Study: Apple Ancient Varieties in Northern Italy [Seite 285]
19.6 - 12.6 Environmental Performance as a Methodological Issue [Seite 286]
19.6.1 - 12.6.1 Specificities of Low/High?input Systems [Seite 287]
19.7 - 12.7 General Issues Emerging from Literature Review [Seite 288]
19.7.1 - 12.7.1 Ancient Cultivars as Sociocultural Values [Seite 288]
19.7.2 - 12.7.2 On the Paradox of Genetically Modified Crops and Sustainability [Seite 289]
19.8 - 12.8 Conclusions and Future Outlook [Seite 290]
19.9 - References [Seite 291]
20 - Chapter 13 Cradle-to-gate Life Cycle Analysis of Agricultural and Food Production in the US: A TRACI Impact Assessment [Seite 296]
20.1 - 13.1 Introduction [Seite 296]
20.1.1 - 13.1.1 Sustainable Agriculture Systems [Seite 296]
20.1.2 - 13.1.2 Environmental Impact Categorization [Seite 297]
20.1.3 - 13.1.3 Life Cycle Assessment [Seite 298]
20.1.4 - 13.1.4 Long-Term Policymaking [Seite 298]
20.1.5 - 13.1.5 TRACI Impacts [Seite 299]
20.2 - 13.2 Literature Review [Seite 300]
20.3 - 13.3 IO-LCA Methodology [Seite 302]
20.3.1 - 13.3.1 IO-LCA [Seite 302]
20.3.2 - 13.3.2 TRACI Impact Assessment [Seite 302]
20.3.3 - 13.3.3 Data [Seite 303]
20.3.4 - 13.3.4 Environmental Impact Assessment Indicators [Seite 305]
20.4 - 13.4 Results [Seite 306]
20.4.1 - 13.4.1 Life Cycle Impact Inventory [Seite 306]
20.4.2 - 13.4.2 Onsite and Supply Chain Decomposition [Seite 316]
20.5 - 13.5 Conclusions and Future Outlook [Seite 317]
20.6 - References [Seite 324]
21 - Chapter 14 Ensuring Self-sufficiency and Sustainability in the Agrofood Sector: Sustainability Challenges in Agriculture and Modelling [Seite 329]
21.1 - 14.1 Introduction: Sustainability Challenges in Agriculture [Seite 329]
21.2 - 14.2 Quantitative Analysis and Modelling of Sustainability [Seite 335]
21.2.1 - 14.2.1 Assessment of Agricultural Sustainability [Seite 335]
21.2.2 - 14.2.2 Sustainability Analysis in Presence of Trade [Seite 336]
21.2.3 - 14.2.3 Dynamical Model of Agricultural Self?Sustainability [Seite 337]
21.2.4 - 14.2.4 Modelling of Population Growth [Seite 337]
21.2.5 - 14.2.5 Dynamics of Primary Resources: Land and Water [Seite 338]
21.2.6 - 14.2.6 Agricultural Productivity and Technology Demand [Seite 338]
21.2.7 - 14.2.7 Production, Demand and Availability of Food [Seite 339]
21.2.8 - 14.2.8 Dynamics of Import and Export [Seite 339]
21.2.9 - 14.2.9 Total Water Available and Demand [Seite 340]
21.2.10 - 14.2.10 Trade of Virtual (Embedded) Water [Seite 341]
21.2.11 - 14.2.11 Projections and Timescales of Water Sustainability Due to Virtual Water Trade [Seite 342]
21.2.12 - 14.2.12 Calibration [Seite 344]
21.2.13 - 14.2.13 Dynamics of Agricultural Self?Sustainability in a Changing Climate [Seite 344]
21.2.14 - 14.2.14 Simulation and Validation of ASeS: Case Study of India [Seite 345]
21.2.15 - 14.2.15 Evolution and Projection of ASeS [Seite 347]
21.2.16 - 14.2.16 Critical Population Load (Carrying Capacity) [Seite 348]
21.2.17 - 14.2.17 Virtual Water Trade and Loss of Water Sustainability [Seite 348]
21.2.18 - 14.2.18 Water Availability and Vulnerability to Virtual Trade [Seite 350]
21.3 - 14.3 Quantification of Sustainability Based on Resource Criticality [Seite 352]
21.4 - 14.4 Technology Demand [Seite 352]
21.5 - 14.5 International Trade and Food Sustainability [Seite 355]
21.6 - 14.6 Conclusions and Future Outlook [Seite 358]
21.7 - References [Seite 360]
22 - Chapter 15 Sustainability Challenges Involved in Use of Nanotechnology in the Agrofood Sector [Seite 365]
22.1 - 15.1 Introduction [Seite 365]
22.2 - 15.2 Nanotechnological Applications in Agricultural Practices [Seite 367]
22.2.1 - 15.2.1 Nanotechnology in Plant?Based Agricultural Production [Seite 367]
22.2.2 - 15.2.2 Nanotechnology in Animal Production and Animal Health [Seite 369]
22.2.3 - 15.2.3 Nanotechnology for Water Quality [Seite 370]
22.3 - 15.3 Nanotechnological Applications in Food [Seite 371]
22.3.1 - 15.3.1 Food Processing [Seite 372]
22.3.2 - 15.3.2 Food Packaging [Seite 374]
22.4 - 15.4 Current Status of Regulation of Nanomaterials in Food [Seite 379]
22.4.1 - 15.4.1 European Union [Seite 380]
22.4.2 - 15.4.2 United States [Seite 380]
22.4.3 - 15.4.3 Australia and New Zealand [Seite 381]
22.4.4 - 15.4.4 Latin America [Seite 381]
22.4.5 - 15.4.5 Hurdles in the Evaluation and Regulation of the Use of Nanotechnology in Foods [Seite 382]
22.5 - 15.5 Conclusions and Future Outlook [Seite 383]
22.6 - References [Seite 383]
23 - Chapter 16 Sustainability of Nutraceuticals and Functional Foods [Seite 391]
23.1 - 16.1 Introduction [Seite 391]
23.2 - 16.2 Nutraceuticals and Functional Foods for Health [Seite 393]
23.3 - 16.3 Health Foods and Food Markets [Seite 398]
23.4 - 16.4 Economy and Management of the Health Food System [Seite 399]
23.5 - 16.5 Food Safety and Food Security Perspective [Seite 401]
23.6 - 16.6 Conclusions and Future Outlook [Seite 405]
23.7 - References [Seite 406]
24 - Chapter 17 Innovation and Sustainable Utilization of Seaweeds as Health Foods [Seite 412]
24.1 - 17.1 Introduction [Seite 412]
24.2 - 17.2 Global Seaweed Industry [Seite 414]
24.2.1 - 17.2.1 Taxonomic Classification and Geographic Distribution of Seaweeds [Seite 414]
24.2.2 - 17.2.2 Market and Application of Seaweeds [Seite 415]
24.2.3 - 17.2.3 Seaweed Cultivation [Seite 417]
24.3 - 17.3 Health-Promoting Properties of Seaweeds [Seite 417]
24.3.1 - 17.3.1 Nutritional Benefits of Seaweeds [Seite 417]
24.3.2 - 17.3.2 Metabolic Syndrome Prevention [Seite 421]
24.3.3 - 17.3.3 Antagonistic and Anti?Carcinogenic Activities [Seite 422]
24.3.4 - 17.3.4 Immunomodulation Activities [Seite 425]
24.3.5 - 17.3.5 Other Health Benefits [Seite 426]
24.4 - 17.4 Novel Application of Seaweeds as Health Foods [Seite 426]
24.4.1 - 17.4.1 Bakery Products, Pasta and Noodles [Seite 427]
24.4.2 - 17.4.2 Beverages and Fermented Drinks [Seite 428]
24.4.3 - 17.4.3 Meat Products [Seite 429]
24.4.4 - 17.4.4 Food Supplement Carriers [Seite 430]
24.5 - 17.5 Challenges for a Sustainable Seaweed Industry [Seite 431]
24.5.1 - 17.5.1 Development of New Applications and Technologies [Seite 431]
24.5.2 - 17.5.2 Improving Seaweed Quality, Productivity and Constant Supply [Seite 432]
24.5.3 - 17.5.3 Managing Biodiversity and Ecological Impact [Seite 434]
24.5.4 - 17.5.4 Policies and Regulations [Seite 436]
24.6 - 17.6 Conclusions and Future Outlook [Seite 437]
24.6.1 - 17.6.1 Economic Importance of Seaweed [Seite 437]
24.6.2 - 17.6.2 Needs and Recommendations [Seite 438]
24.6.3 - 17.6.3 Future Research Direction [Seite 439]
24.7 - Acknowledgements [Seite 440]
24.8 - References [Seite 440]
25 - Chapter 18 Agrofoods for Sustainable Health Benefits and Their Economic Viability [Seite 457]
25.1 - 18.1 Introduction [Seite 457]
25.2 - 18.2 Agrofoods and Globalization [Seite 458]
25.3 - 18.3 Phytochemistry [Seite 459]
25.3.1 - 18.3.1 Grapes [Seite 459]
25.3.2 - 18.3.2 Pomegranate [Seite 462]
25.3.3 - 18.3.3 Citrus Fruits [Seite 463]
25.3.4 - 18.3.4 Carrot [Seite 465]
25.3.5 - 18.3.5 Spinach [Seite 465]
25.4 - 18.4 Phytochemicals and Market Value [Seite 466]
25.5 - 18.5 Conclusions and Future Outlook [Seite 467]
25.6 - References [Seite 467]
26 - Chapter 19 Sustainability Challenges in Food Tourism [Seite 473]
26.1 - 19.1 Introduction [Seite 473]
26.2 - 19.2 Sustainability Challenges Incurred in Food Tourism [Seite 476]
26.2.1 - 19.2.1 Defining Food Resources and their Impact on Food Tourism [Seite 477]
26.2.2 - 19.2.2 Supply Chain of Food Resources [Seite 480]
26.2.3 - 19.2.3 Constraints and Sustainability Challenges in Procurement and Outsourcing of Raw Materials [Seite 485]
26.2.4 - 19.2.4 Agro-Tourism and the Local Economy [Seite 487]
26.2.5 - 19.2.5 Pattern of Consumption of Local Cuisines and Food Products [Seite 488]
26.2.6 - 19.2.6 Formal Organoleptic Training for Consistency of Local Cuisines [Seite 489]
26.3 - 19.3 Conclusions and Future Outlook [Seite 492]
26.4 - References [Seite 494]
27 - Chapter 20 Diversification, Innovation and Safety of Local Cuisines and Processed Food Products: Emerging Issues and the Sustainability Challenges [Seite 504]
27.1 - 20.1 Introduction [Seite 504]
27.2 - 20.2 Choice of Local Cuisines: Impact of Diversification and Innovation [Seite 506]
27.2.1 - 20.2.1 Local Cuisines: Diversification and Innovation [Seite 507]
27.2.2 - 20.2.2 Local Cuisines and Local Food Products: Authenticity and Proliferation [Seite 508]
27.2.3 - 20.2.3 Local Food Products: Diversification and Innovation [Seite 510]
27.3 - 20.3 Microbiological Food Safety Issues in Local Cuisines [Seite 511]
27.3.1 - 20.3.1 Food-Transmitted Diseases [Seite 512]
27.3.2 - 20.3.2 Traveller's Diarrhoea (TD) [Seite 513]
27.3.3 - 20.3.3 Avoidance of Food Transmitted Diseases [Seite 513]
27.3.4 - 20.3.4 Prevention of Food Contamination and Food Poisoning Outbreak [Seite 515]
27.4 - 20.4 Production Planning, Processing Treatments, Market Complaints and Production Control of Local Food Products [Seite 517]
27.5 - 20.5 Food Wastages in the Food Service and Manufacturing Sectors [Seite 519]
27.6 - 20.6 Conclusions and Future Outlook [Seite 520]
27.7 - References [Seite 522]
28 - Chapter 21 Soil Health, Crop Productivity and Sustainability Challenges [Seite 531]
28.1 - 21.1 Introduction [Seite 531]
28.2 - 21.2 Soil Quality/Health: Concepts and Definitions [Seite 533]
28.3 - 21.3 Soil Health Indices/Indicators [Seite 534]
28.4 - 21.4 Soil Constraints in Crop Production and Productivity [Seite 537]
28.5 - 21.5 Concept of Healthy Soil [Seite 538]
28.6 - 21.6 Emerging Sustainable Challenges in Soil Health Management [Seite 541]
28.7 - 21.7 Soil Health and its Management [Seite 542]
28.8 - 21.8 Conclusions and Future Outlook [Seite 544]
28.9 - References [Seite 546]
29 - Chapter 22 Analysing the Environmental, Energy and Economic Feasibility of Biomethanation of Agrifood Waste: A Case Study from Spain [Seite 554]
29.1 - 22.1 Introduction [Seite 554]
29.2 - 22.2 Method Adopted [Seite 555]
29.2.1 - 22.2.1 Experimental Setup [Seite 555]
29.2.2 - 22.2.2 Preparation of Substrates [Seite 556]
29.2.3 - 22.2.3 Start-Up of the Anaerobic Digestion Process [Seite 557]
29.2.4 - 22.2.4 Analytical Method Adopted [Seite 557]
29.2.5 - 22.2.5 Estimate of Environmental Benefits of Biomethanation [Seite 558]
29.2.6 - 22.2.6 Calculation of Energy Potential of Anaerobic Digestion [Seite 558]
29.2.7 - 22.2.7 Estimate of Economic Feasibility of Biomethanation [Seite 558]
29.3 - 22.3 Major Outcome of this Study [Seite 559]
29.3.1 - 22.3.1 Inventory of Wastes Generated by Agrifood Industries in Extremadura, Spain [Seite 559]
29.3.2 - 22.3.2 Physicochemical Characterization of the Agrifood Waste [Seite 560]
29.3.3 - 22.3.3 Anaerobic Digestion Experiments [Seite 562]
29.3.4 - 22.3.4 Environmental Benefits of Biomethanation [Seite 564]
29.3.5 - 22.3.5 Energy Benefits [Seite 566]
29.3.6 - 22.3.6 Design and Sizing of Anaerobic Digestion Plants to Treat the Main Agrifood Waste Generated by An Average-Size Company in Extremadura, Spain [Seite 566]
29.3.7 - 22.3.7 Economic Feasibility of the Construction of Industrial-Scale Anaerobic Digestion Plants [Seite 568]
29.4 - 22.4 Conclusions and Future Outlook [Seite 569]
29.5 - Acknowledgements [Seite 570]
29.6 - References [Seite 570]
30 - Chapter 23 Agricultural Waste for Promoting Sustainable Energy [Seite 573]
30.1 - 23.1 Introduction [Seite 573]
30.2 - 23.2 Agricultural Biomass Category [Seite 575]
30.3 - 23.3 Estimate of Availability and Potential of Agricultural Biomass Resources [Seite 575]
30.4 - 23.4 Sustainability of Agricultural Biomass [Seite 579]
30.4.1 - 23.4.1 Environmental Concerns [Seite 580]
30.4.2 - 23.4.2 Social Concerns [Seite 583]
30.4.3 - 23.4.3 Economic Concerns [Seite 585]
30.5 - 23.5 Conversion of Agricultural Waste for Promoting Sustainable Energy Technology [Seite 586]
30.5.1 - 23.5.1 Thermo-Chemical Conversion [Seite 588]
30.5.2 - 23.5.2 Combustion Technology [Seite 588]
30.5.3 - 23.5.3 Pyrolysis [Seite 589]
30.5.4 - 23.5.4 Gasification [Seite 589]
30.5.5 - 23.5.5 Physical Conversions [Seite 590]
30.5.6 - 23.5.6 Bio-Chemical Process [Seite 590]
30.6 - 23.6 Conclusions and Future Outlook [Seite 591]
30.7 - References [Seite 592]
31 - Chapter 24 Membrane Technology in Fish-processing Waste Utilization: Some Insights on Sustainability [Seite 597]
31.1 - 24.1 Introduction [Seite 597]
31.2 - 24.2 Membrane Technology [Seite 599]
31.2.1 - 24.2.1 Membrane Processes [Seite 599]
31.2.2 - 24.2.2 Pressure Driven Membrane Filtration [Seite 600]
31.2.3 - 24.2.3 Benefits and Limitations [Seite 602]
31.3 - 24.3 Fishmeal Processing Wastewater [Seite 603]
31.4 - 24.4 Surimi Processing Wastewater [Seite 605]
31.5 - 24.5 Cooking Juice [Seite 609]
31.5.1 - 24.5.1 Tuna Cooking Juice [Seite 609]
31.5.2 - 24.5.2 Crustacean and Shellfish Cooking Juice [Seite 610]
31.6 - 24.6 Solid Waste [Seite 611]
31.6.1 - 24.6.1 Gelatin from Fish Skin [Seite 611]
31.6.2 - 24.6.2 Protein Hydrolysate and Protease from Fish Viscera [Seite 612]
31.6.3 - 24.6.3 Bioactive Peptides from Fish Protein [Seite 613]
31.6.4 - 24.6.4 Oligosaccharides from Chitosan [Seite 613]
31.7 - 24.7 Conclusions and Future Outlook [Seite 614]
31.8 - References [Seite 615]
32 - Chapter 25 Sustainability Issues, Challenges and Controversies Surrounding the Palm Oil Industry [Seite 618]
32.1 - 25.1 Introduction [Seite 618]
32.2 - 25.2 Wastewater and Solid Residues from the Palm Oil Industry [Seite 619]
32.3 - 25.3 Bioethanol Production from Lignocellulosic Biomass [Seite 621]
32.4 - 25.4 Anaerobic Digestion of Wastewater and Solid Residues in the Palm Oil Industry [Seite 624]
32.4.1 - 25.4.1 Biogas Production [Seite 624]
32.4.2 - 25.4.2 Biohydrogen Production [Seite 628]
32.5 - 25.5 Integrated System of Sustainability and Bioenergy Production for Zero Emission [Seite 628]
32.6 - 25.6 Conclusions and Future Outlook [Seite 631]
32.7 - References [Seite 631]
33 - Chapter 26 Sustainability Challenges in the Coffee Plantation Sector [Seite 638]
33.1 - 26.1 Introduction [Seite 638]
33.2 - 26.2 Sustainable Challenges in the Coffee Sector In India [Seite 639]
33.2.1 - 26.2.1 On-Farm Challenges [Seite 639]
33.2.2 - 26.2.2 Off-Farm Challenges [Seite 646]
33.2.3 - 26.2.3 Marketing and Export Challenges [Seite 649]
33.3 - 26.3 Ecosystem Service and Environmental Challenges [Seite 651]
33.3.1 - 26.3.1 Soil Fertility Degradation and Restoration [Seite 652]
33.3.2 - 26.3.2 Soil and Water Pollution: Waste Disposal and its Ecological Effects [Seite 652]
33.3.3 - 26.3.3 Biodiversity Conservation [Seite 653]
33.3.4 - 26.3.4 Conservation of Shade Trees in Coffee Plantations (Deforestation and Afforestation) [Seite 653]
33.4 - 26.4 Sustainable Challenges for the Government Linked to Coffee Production [Seite 654]
33.4.1 - 26.4.1 Global Price Fluctuation, Market Volatility, Market Intelligence [Seite 654]
33.4.2 - 26.4.2 Farm Finance and Subsidies [Seite 655]
33.4.3 - 26.4.3 Quality Issues and Certification [Seite 656]
33.4.4 - 26.4.4 Research and Extension Services [Seite 656]
33.4.5 - 26.4.5 Promotion and Marketing [Seite 656]
33.5 - 26.5 Conclusions and Future Outlook [Seite 657]
33.6 - References [Seite 659]
34 - Chapter 27 Food Safety Education: Training Farm Workers in the US Fresh Produce Sector [Seite 665]
34.1 - 27.1 Introduction [Seite 665]
34.2 - 27.2 Agriculture in the US [Seite 666]
34.3 - 27.3 Food Safety Laws and Regulations Related to Fresh Produce [Seite 668]
34.3.1 - 27.3.1 Produce Safety Alliance [Seite 670]
34.3.2 - 27.3.2 Food Safety Preventative Controls Alliance [Seite 671]
34.3.3 - 27.3.3 Sprout Safety Alliance [Seite 671]
34.4 - 27.4 Prevention and Control Strategies [Seite 671]
34.5 - 27.5 Role of the Farm Workers in Preventing Foodborne Disease [Seite 672]
34.6 - 27.6 Elements of Good Training Programmes [Seite 674]
34.6.1 - 27.6.1 Theoretical Framework [Seite 675]
34.6.2 - 27.6.2 Adult Learning Theory [Seite 675]
34.6.3 - 27.6.3 Mode of Training [Seite 676]
34.6.4 - 27.6.4 Credibility of the Trainer [Seite 677]
34.6.5 - 27.6.5 Evaluating Training Programmes [Seite 678]
34.7 - 27.7 Conclusions and Future Outlook [Seite 678]
34.8 - References [Seite 679]
35 - Chapter 28 Sustainability Challenges and Educating People Involved in the Agrofood Sector [Seite 682]
35.1 - 28.1 Introduction [Seite 682]
35.2 - 28.2 Education for Sustainable Development [Seite 684]
35.3 - 28.3 Planning Education for Sustainable Development for People Involved in the Agrofood Sector [Seite 685]
35.4 - 28.4 Themes for the Education of People Involved in the Agrofood Sector [Seite 687]
35.4.1 - 28.4.1 Conservation and Environmental Protection [Seite 688]
35.4.2 - 28.4.2 Sustainable Consumption and Production [Seite 689]
35.4.3 - 28.4.3 Environmentally Sustainable Technologies [Seite 690]
35.4.4 - 28.4.4 Sustainable Cities [Seite 690]
35.4.5 - 28.4.5 Other Themes on Sustainability [Seite 691]
35.5 - 28.5 Conclusions and Future Outlook [Seite 692]
35.6 - References [Seite 693]
36 - Index [Seite 697]
37 - EULA [Seite 715]
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