Phytonutritional Improvement of Crops

 
 
Wiley-Blackwell (Verlag)
  • erschienen am 25. Juli 2017
  • |
  • 544 Seiten
 
E-Book | ePUB mit Adobe-DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-1-119-07998-9 (ISBN)
 
An in-depth treatment of cutting-edge work being done internationally to develop new techniques in crop nutritional quality improvement
Phytonutritional Improvement of Crops explores recent advances in biotechnological methods for the nutritional enrichment of food crops. Featuring contributions from an international group of experts in the field, it provides cutting-edge information on techniques of immense importance to academic, professional and commercial operations.
World population is now estimated to be 7.5 billion people, with an annual growth rate of nearly 1.5%. Clearly, the need to enhance not only the quantity of food produced but its quality has never been greater, especially among less developed nations. Genetic manipulation offers the best prospect for achieving that goal. As many fruit crops provide proven health benefits, research efforts need to be focused on improving the nutritional qualities of fruits and vegetables through increased synthesis of lycopene and beta carotene, anthocyanins and some phenolics known to be strong antioxidants. Despite tremendous growth in the area occurring over the past several decades, the work has only just begun. This book represents an effort to address the urgent need to promote those efforts and to mobilise the tools of biotechnical and genetic engineering of the major food crops. Topics covered include:
* New applications of RNA-interference and virus induced gene silencing (VIGS) for nutritional genomics in crop plants
* Biotechnological techniques for enhancing carotenoid in crops and their implications for both human health and sustainable development
* Progress being made in the enrichment and metabolic profiling of diverse carotenoids in a range of fruit crops, including tomatoes, sweet potatoes and tropical fruits
* Biotechnologies for boosting the phytonutritional values of key crops, including grapes and sweet potatoes
* Recent progress in the development of transgenic rice engineered to massively accumulate flavonoids in-seed
Phytonutritional Improvement of Crops is an important text/reference that belongs in all universities and research establishments where agriculture, horticulture, biological sciences, and food science and technology are studied, taught and applied.
1. Auflage
  • Englisch
  • Newark
  • |
  • Großbritannien
John Wiley & Sons
  • 5,09 MB
978-1-119-07998-9 (9781119079989)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
Noureddine Benkeblia, PhD is Professor of Crop Science in the Department of Life Sciences, the University of the West Indies, Jamaica. He is involved in food science research focusing on food-plant biochemistry and physiology, and he is recognised internationally for his work on pre- and postharvest metabolism in crops. Prof. N. Benkeblia is the recipient of many awards, among them the UWI-Award for the "Most Outstanding Research," 2011 and 2013.
  • Intro
  • Title Page
  • Copyright
  • Table of Contents
  • List of Contributors
  • Foreword
  • Chapter 1: Important Plant-Based Phytonutrients
  • 1.1 Introduction
  • 1.2 Nutraceuticals and Functional Foods in Human Health
  • 1.3 Plants with Potential for Use as Nutraceutical Source and Functional Food Component
  • 1.4 Nutraceutical Values of Fenugreek
  • 1.5 Coloured Potatoes as Functional Food
  • 1.6 Red Wine as Functional Food
  • 1.7 Tea as Functional Food
  • 1.8 Cereals as Nutraceuticals
  • 1.9 Nutraceutical Properties of Wheat Bran and Germ
  • 1.10 Barley and Oat as Nutraceuticals
  • 1.11 Value-Added Products
  • 1.12 Conclusion
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • Chapter 2: Biotechnological Interventions for Improvement of Plant Nutritional Value: From Mechanisms to Applications
  • 2.1 Introduction
  • 2.2 Improvement of Food Nutrition
  • 2.3 Improvement of Nutritional Value Through Crop Improvement
  • 2.4 Identification of Genes With the Potential to Improve the Nutritional Quality
  • 2.5 Genetic Engineering for the Introduction of Nutritionally Potential Genes
  • 2.6 Nutritional Improvement Through Recent Biotechnological Advances
  • 2.7 Production of Health Care Products
  • 2.8 Major Biotechnological Advances in Nutritional Improvement of Plants
  • 2.9 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 3: Nutrient Biofortification of Staple Food Crops: Technologies, Products and Prospects
  • 3.1 Introduction
  • 3.2 The Concepts of Nutrition and Malnutrition
  • 3.3 Strategies to Enhance Nutrient Intake and Nutrient Content of Plant Foods
  • 3.4 Quantitative and Qualitative Modification of Dietary Carbohydrates
  • 3.5 Quantitative and Qualitative Enhancement of Proteins and Amino Acids
  • 3.6 Quantitative and Qualitative Enhancement of Fatty Acids in Oil Seed Crops
  • 3.7 Enhancement of Levels of Vitamins
  • 3.8 Enhancement of Levels of Mineral Elements
  • 3.9 Enhancement of Antioxidants
  • 3.10 Mitigation of Levels of Antinutritional Factors
  • 3.11 Conclusions and Recommendations
  • Acknowledgement
  • References
  • Chapter 4: Applications of RNA-Interference and Virus-Induced Gene Silencing (VIGS) for Nutritional Genomics in Crop Plants
  • 4.1 Introduction
  • 4.2 RNA Interference
  • 4.3 Virus-Induced Gene Silencing (VIGS) for Biofortification
  • 4.4 Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 5: Strategies for Enhancing Phytonutrient Content in Plant-Based Foods
  • 5.1 Introduction
  • 5.2 What are Phytonutrients?
  • 5.3 Which Plant-Based Foods are the Best Known Sources of Phytonutrients?
  • 5.4 How Can We Enhance Phytonutrients?
  • 5.5 Phenotyping for Phytonutrients at Different Levels
  • 5.6 The Future Ahead/Concluding Remarks
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • Chapter 6: The Use of Genetic Engineering to Improve the Nutritional Profile of Traditional Plant Foods
  • 6.1 Introduction
  • 6.2 What Are Genetically Engineered Crops?
  • 6.3 GM Plant Foods Under Approval for Commercial Utilisation
  • 6.4 Socioeconomic Impact and Safety of GM Foods
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • Chapter 7: Carotenoids: Biotechnological Improvements for Human Health and Sustainable Development
  • 7.1 Introduction
  • 7.2 Occurrence
  • 7.3 Discovery and Early History
  • 7.4 Carotenoids Use in Human Foods and Biotechnology
  • 7.5 Use of Carotenoids in Animal Feed
  • 7.6 Global Market Situation and Sustainability
  • 7.7 Carotenoid Biosynthesis and Function in Plants
  • 7.8 Conclusion and Perspectives
  • References
  • Chapter 8: Progress in Enrichment and Metabolic Profiling of Diverse Carotenoids in Tropical Fruits: Importance of Hyphenated Techniques
  • 8.1 Introduction
  • 8.2 Trends in Biosynthesis of Carotenoids and their Profiling in Plants and Tropical Fruits
  • 8.3 Biotechnological Approaches to Enrich Carotenoids in Tropical Fruits
  • 8.4 Bioaccessibility and Bioavailability of Carotenoids From Fruits and Their Products
  • 8.5 Techniques to Characterise Carotenoids from Fruits
  • 8.6 Conclusion
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • Chapter 9: Improvement of Carotenoid Accumulation in Tomato Fruit
  • 9.1 Introduction
  • 9.2 Metabolism of Carotenoid in Tomato
  • 9.3 The Biosynthetic Capacities of the Plastid
  • 9.4 Hormonal Regulatory Network of Carotenoid Metabolism
  • 9.5 Environmental Regulation of Carotenoid Metabolism
  • 9.6 Bioavailability of Carotenoid
  • 9.7 Food Omics
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • Chapter 10: Modern Biotechnologies and Phytonutritional Improvement of Grape and Wine
  • 10.1 Grape Genomics
  • 10.2 Marker Assisted Selection (MAS) and Genomic Selection (GS) of Grapevine
  • 10.3 Engineered Resistance to Viruses
  • 10.4 Diagnosis of Grapevine Viruses
  • 10.5 Phytonutritional Compounds with Biological Activity in Grape and Wine and Their Target Analyses
  • 10.6 Wine Quality
  • 10.7 Grapevine Genetic Resources- Prospects in Management and Sustainable Use
  • References
  • Chapter 11: Phytonutrient Improvements of Sweetpotato
  • 11.1 Introduction
  • 11.2 Nutritional Qualities of Sweetpotato
  • 11.3 Phytonutrient Improvements of Sweetpotato
  • 11.4 Conclusion and Future Perspectives
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • Chapter 12: Improvement of Glucosinolate in Cruciferous Crops
  • 12.1 Introduction
  • 12.2 Glucosinolate Breakdown
  • 12.3 Biological Functions of Glucosinolates and Their Hydrolysis Products
  • 12.4 Glucosinolate Biosynthesis
  • 12.5 Metabolic Engineering of Glucosinolates in Brassica Crops
  • 12.6 Glucosinolate Accumulation under Pre-Harvest and Post-Harvest Handlings
  • 12.7 Conclusions and Future Prospects
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • Chapter 13: Development of the Transgenic Rice Accumulating Flavonoids in Seed by Metabolic Engineering
  • 13.1 Introduction
  • 13.2 Production of Flavonoids in Rice Seed by Ectopic Expression of the Biosynthetic Enzymes
  • 13.3 Production of Flavonoids in Rice Seed by Ectopic Expression of the Transcription Factors
  • 13.4 Characterisation of Flavonoids in Transgenic Rice Seed by LC-MS-based Metabolomics
  • 13.5 Future Prospects
  • References
  • Chapter 14: Nutrient Management for High Efficiency Sweetpotato Production
  • 14.1 Patterns of Growth and Development and Nutrient Absorption in Sweetpotato
  • 14.2 Screening of High Efficient of Potassium Uptake and Utilised Genotypes
  • 14.3 Effect of Fertilisers
  • 14.4 Balanced Fertiliser Management in Sweetpotato at Sishui, Shandong: A Case Study
  • 14.5 Application of Fertilisers Through Drip Irrigation ('Fertigation')
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • Index
  • End User License Agreement

List of Contributors


  1. Mukhtar Ahmad
  2. Department of Agronomy
  3. PMAS-Arid Agriculture University Rawalpindi
  4. Punjab, Pakistan
  5. Seetharam Annadana
  6. Technology Lead for an MNC
  7. Krishi, 29, CR Layout
  8. Sarakki Main Road
  9. Bengaluru
  10. India

 

  1. Bangalore Prabhashankar Arathi
  2. Department of Biotechnology
  3. Jnana Bharathi Campus
  4. Bangalore University
  5. Bengaluru, India

 

  1. Muhammad Asif
  2. Department of Agricultural
  3. Food and Nutritional Science
  4. University of Alberta
  5. Edmonton, AB, Canada

 

  1. Atanas Atanassov
  2. JGC, Sofia
  3. Bulgaria

 

  1. Ilian Badjakov
  2. Agrobioinstitute
  3. Sofia
  4. Bulgaria

 

  1. Vallikannan Baskaran
  2. Department of Biochemistry and Nutrition
  3. CSIR-Central Food Technological Research Institute
  4. Mysuru
  5. India

 

  1. Saikat Kumar Basu
  2. Department of Biological Sciences
  3. University of Lethbridge
  4. Lethbridge, AB
  5. Canada

 

  1. Avik Basu
  2. Calcutta Medical College
  3. Kolkata, WB
  4. India

 

  1. Noureddine Benkeblia
  2. Laboratory of Crop Science
  3. Department of Life Sciences
  4. The University of the West Indies
  5. Mona campus
  6. Kingston
  7. Jamaica

 

  1. Congxi Cai
  2. Department of Horticulture
  3. Zhejiang University
  4. Hangzhou, Zhejiang
  5. China

 

  1. William Cetzal-Ix
  2. Instituto Tecnológico de Chiná
  3. Calle 11 entre 22 y 28
  4. Colonia Centro Chiná 24050
  5. Campeche
  6. México

 

  1. Jiaqi Chang
  2. Department of Horticulture
  3. Zhejiang University
  4. Hangzhou, Zhejiang
  5. China

 

  1. Dai-Fu Ma
  2. Xuzhou Sweetpotato Research Center
  3. Xuzhou Academy of Agricultural Science
  4. Xuzhou, Jiangsu
  5. China

 

  1. Mingdan Deng
  2. Department of Horticulture
  3. Zhejiang University
  4. Hangzhou, Zhejiang
  5. China

 

  1. Danapati Dhungyel
    Renewable Natural Resources Research and Development Centre (RNR RDC)
    Wengkhar
    Mongar, Bhutan

 

  1. Ivayla Dincheva
  2. Agrobioinstitute
  3. Sofia
  4. Bulgaria

 

  1. Teodora Dzhambazova
  2. Agrobioinstitute
  3. Sofia
  4. Bulgaria

 

  1. Vasil Georgiev
  2. Center for Viticulture and Small Fruit Research
  3. College of Agriculture and Food Science
  4. Florida A&M University
  5. Tallahassee, FL
  6. USA

 

  1. Arvind Hirani
  2. Department of Plant Science
  3. University of Manitoba
  4. Winnipeg, MB
  5. Canada
  6. Tshitila Jongthap
    Medicinal and Aromatic Plants
    Renewable Natural Resources Research and Development Centre (RNR RDC) Yusipang
    Ministry of Agriculture and Forests
    Government of Bhutan
    Thimphu, Bhutan

 

  1. Miroslava Kakalova
  2. University of Food Technologies
  3. Plovdiv
  4. Bulgaria

 

  1. Ivanka Kamenova
  2. Agrobioinstitute
  3. Sofia
  4. Bulgaria

 

  1. Rajan Katoch
  2. Biochemistry Laboratory Department of Crop Improvement
  3. CSKHPKV, Palampur
  4. India

 

  1. George G. Khachatourians
  2. Departments of Food and Bioproduct Sciences
  3. College of Agriculture and Bioresources
  4. University of Saskatchewan
  5. Saskatoon
  6. Canada

 

  1. Rangaswamy Lakshminarayana
  2. Department of Biotechnology
  3. Jnana Bharathi Campus
  4. Bangalore University
  5. Bengaluru
  6. India

 

  1. Xianping Li
  2. Industrial Crop Research Institute
  3. Yunnan Academy of Agricultural Sciences
  4. Kunming, Yunnan
  5. China

 

  1. Yanshan Li
  2. Industrial Crop Research Institute
  3. Yunnan Academy of Agricultural Sciences
  4. Kunming, Yunnan
  5. China

 

  1. Shuo Li
  2. Department of Horticulture
  3. Zhejiang University
  4. Hangzhou, Zhejiang
  5. China

 

  1. Marta R.M. Lima
  2. CBQF-Centro de Biotecnologia e Química Fina
  3. Escola Superior de Biotecnologia
  4. Universidade Católica Portuguesa
  5. Porto, Portugal

 

  1. Yuanyuan Liu
  2. Department of Horticulture
  3. Zhejiang University
  4. Hangzhou, Zhejiang
  5. China

 

  1. Lihong Liu
  2. Department of Horticulture
  3. Zhejiang University
  4. Hangzhou, Zhejiang
  5. China

 

  1. Haoran Liu
  2. Department of Horticulture
  3. Zhejiang University
  4. Hangzhou, Zhejiang
  5. China

 

  1. Tianyu Liu
  2. Department of Horticulture
  3. Zhejiang University
  4. Hangzhou, Zhejiang
  5. China

 

  1. Ambrose Obongo Mbuya
  2. Department of Theology
  3. Great Lakes University of Kisumu (GLUK)-Kenya
  4. Kisumu
  5. Kenya

 

  1. Huiying Miao
  2. Department of Horticulture
  3. Zhejiang University
  4. Hangzhou, Zhejiang
  5. China

 

  1. Dasha Mihaylova
  2. University of Food Technologies
  3. Plovdiv
  4. Bulgaria

 

  1. Plamen Mollov
  2. University of Food Technologies
  3. Plovdiv
  4. Bulgaria

 

  1. Yuko Ogo
  2. National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences
  3. Transgenic Crop Research and Development Center
  4. Kannondai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki
  5. Japan

 

  1. Basavaprabhu L. Patil
  2. Senior Scientists
  3. National Research Center on Plant Biotechnology
  4. Pusa, New Delhi
  5. India

 

  1. Atanas Pavlov
  2. University of Food Technologies
  3. Plovdiv, Bulgaria

 

  1. Hongmei Qian
  2. Department of Horticulture
  3. Zhejiang University
  4. Hangzhou, Zhejiang
  5. China

 

  1. Chavali Kameswara Rao
  2. Foundation for Biotechnology Awareness and Education
  3. Bangalore
  4. India

 

  1. Muhammad Sajad
  2. Department of Plant Breeding and Genetics
  3. University College of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences
  4. The Islamia University of Bahawalpur
  5. Punjab
  6. Pakistan

 

  1. Carla S. Santos
  2. CBQF-Centro de Biotecnologia e Química Fina
  3. Escola Superior de Biotecnologia
  4. Universidade Católica Portuguesa
  5. Porto, Portugal

 

  1. Ratnabali Sengupta
  2. Department of Zoology
  3. WB State University
  4. Barasat, WB
  5. India

 

  1. Zhiyong Shao
  2. Department of Horticulture
  3. Zhejiang University
  4. Hangzhou, Zhejiang
  5. China

 

  1. Yan-Xi Shi
  2. Qingdao Agricultural University
  3. Chengyang, Qingdao
  4. Shandong, China

 

  1. Sunil Kumar Singh
    National Research Centre on Plant Biotechnology
    IARI, New DelhiIndia

 

  1. Subodh Kumar Sinha
  2. Senior Scientists
  3. National Research Center on Plant Biotechnology
  4. Pusa, New Delhi
  5. India

 

  1. Francisco Solorio-Sánchez
  2. Campus de Ciencias Biológicas y Agropecuarias
    Universidad Autónoma de Yucatán
  3. Mérida, Yucatán
  4. México

 

  1. Poorigali Raghavendra-Rao Sowmya
  2. Department of Biotechnology
  3. Jnana Bharathi Campus
  4. Bangalore University
  5. Bengaluru, India

 

  1. Bo Sun
  2. Department of Horticulture
  3. Zhejiang University
  4. Hangzhou, Zhejiang
  5. China

 

  1. Fumio Takaiwa
  2. National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences
  3. Transgenic Crop Research and Development Center
  4. Tsukuba,...

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