Advances in Neuroergonomics and Cognitive Engineering

Proceedings of the AHFE 2017 International Conference on Neuroergonomics and Cognitive Engineering, July 17-21, 2017, The Westin Bonaventure Hotel, Los Angeles, California, USA
 
 
Springer (Verlag)
  • erschienen am 12. Juni 2017
  • |
  • XV, 458 Seiten
 
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe-DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
E-Book | PDF mit Wasserzeichen-DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-3-319-60642-2 (ISBN)
 

This book offers a broad perspective on the field of cognitive engineering and neuroergonomics, covering emerging practices and future trends toward the harmonious integration of human operators with computational systems. It reports on novel theoretical findings on mental workload and stress, activity theory, human reliability, error and risk, and neuroergonomic measures alike, together with a wealth of cutting-edge applications. Further, the book describes key advances in our understanding of cognitive processes, including mechanisms of perception, memory, reasoning, and motor response, with a special emphasis on their role in interactions between humans and other elements of computer-based systems. Based on the AHFE's main track on Neuroergonomics and Cognitive Engineering, held on July 17-21, 2017 in Los Angeles, California, USA, it provides readers with a comprehensive overview of the current challenges in cognitive computing and factors influencing human performance.

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Dr. Baldwin teaches and conducts research in conjunction with the Human Factors and Applied Cognition program. She has over 15 years of experience investigating human factors issues in mental workload, surface and air transportation and cognitive aging. Her primary research interests are in the area of applied auditory cognition. Much of her work involves the use of neurophysiological measures (i.e., EEG, ERP, EKG, and eye tracking) to examine the effort expended when individuals perform multiple modality dual tasks as a function of changes in sensory or environmental condition and cognitive aspects of the task. Dr. Baldwin has an active line of externally funded research and is currently working in conjunction with sponsors such as the Office of Naval Research, National Highway Traffic Safety Foundation, Air Force Office of Scientific Research, National Science Foundation and the Department of Transportation. She has successfully completed multiple projects for the National Institutes of Health

She is the author of 14 peer-reviewed journal publications, one book, 12 book chapters and over 50 scientific conference proceedings to date.

  • Intro
  • Advances in Human Factors and Ergonomics 2017
  • Preface
  • Contents
  • Human-Autonomy Teaming
  • Why Human-Autonomy Teaming?
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Human-Autonomy Teaming: Critical Factors
  • 2.1 Brittle Automation
  • 2.2 Lack of Transparency
  • 2.3 Lack of Shared Awareness
  • 2.4 Miscalibrated Trust
  • 2.5 The Challenge of Monitoring
  • 3 A Conceptual Model for HAT
  • 3.1 Bi-directional Communication
  • 3.2 Transparency
  • 3.3 Operator Directed Interface
  • 3.4 A HAT Agent
  • 4 Conclusion
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • A Human-Autonomy Teaming Approach for a Flight-Following Task
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Method
  • 2.1 Participants
  • 2.2 Simulation Environment
  • 2.3 Experimental Design
  • 3 Results
  • 3.1 Post-scenario Comparisons
  • 3.2 Simulation Ratings
  • 4 Discussion and Conclusion
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Measuring the Effectiveness of Human Autonomy Teaming
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 1.1 Factors Determining HAT Effectiveness
  • 1.2 Measuring HAT Effectiveness
  • 2 Method
  • 2.1 Participants
  • 2.2 Ground Station Configuration
  • 2.3 Procedure
  • 2.4 HAT Metrics
  • 3 Results
  • 4 Discussion
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • Beyond Point Design: General Pattern to Specific Implementations
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 1.1 Problems with Highly Automated Systems
  • 1.2 HAT Solutions
  • 1.3 The Value of a Generalizable Solution
  • 2 HAT in Other Domains
  • 2.1 Photography
  • 2.2 Navigating by Car
  • 3 HAT Design Patterns
  • 3.1 Plays
  • 3.2 Timing
  • 3.3 Bi-directional Communication
  • 3.4 What Is a Design Pattern?
  • 3.5 A Bi-directional Communication Pattern
  • 4 Next Steps: Toward a Framework
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Using a Crew Resource Management Framework to Develop Human-Autonomy Teaming Measures
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Concept of Operation for Reduced Crew Operations
  • 3 Building a Design Pattern
  • 3.1 Use Case: Designing Thunderstorm Alerting
  • 4 The CMSD Measurement System
  • 4.1 Use Case 1: Designing Thunderstorm Alerting
  • 4.2 Use Case 2: Designing Traffic Avoidance
  • 4.3 Use Case 3: Evaluating Traffic Avoidance
  • 5 Discussion
  • References
  • The Impact of Neurocognitive Temporal Training on Reaction Time and Running Memory of U.S. Active Duty Personnel
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Methods
  • 2.1 Participants
  • 2.2 Procedure
  • 2.3 Instrumentation
  • 2.4 Data Analysis
  • 3 Results
  • 3.1 Demographics
  • 3.2 Simple Reaction Time (SRT)
  • 3.3 Running Memory Continuous Performance Test (RMCP)
  • 4 Discussion
  • 5 Limitations
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • Neurocognitive Temporal Training for Improved Military Marksmanship: Grouping and Zeroing
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Literature Review
  • 2.1 Interactive Metronome
  • 2.2 Military Marksmanship
  • 2.3 Simulated Shooting Shelter
  • 3 Methods
  • 3.1 Participants
  • 3.2 Questionnaires
  • 3.3 Engagement Skills Trainer (EST) 2000 Outcome Measures
  • 3.4 Procedures
  • 4 Results
  • 4.1 Demographics
  • 4.2 Pre- and Post-tests
  • 4.3 Change Score Analysis of Variance for All Outcome Measures
  • 5 Discussion
  • 5.1 Limitations
  • 6 Conclusion
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • Audition and Workload
  • Neurofeedback for Personalized Adaptive Training
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Methods: Multi-session Flight Simulator Adaptive Training
  • 2.1 Participants
  • 2.2 Experimental Procedure
  • 2.3 Metrics
  • 3 Results
  • 4 Discussion
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • SHELL Revisited: Cognitive Loading and Effects of Digitized Flight Deck Automation
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 The SHELL Model Revisited
  • 2.1 The SHELL Model 2017 and the (L)-(H) Interface
  • 2.2 The (L)-(E) Interface
  • 2.3 The (L)-(S) Interface
  • 2.4 The (L)-(L) Interface
  • 3 The SHELL Model 2017 and Asiana Flight 214
  • 4 The SHELL 2017 and the Potential Human Factors Cognition Issue
  • 4.1 Cognitive Processing
  • 4.2 Cognitive Flow
  • 4.3 Cognitive Loading
  • 4.4 Situational Awareness
  • 5 Conclusions
  • References
  • Workload Assessment and Human Error Identification During the Task of Taking a Plain Abdominal Radiograph: A Case Study
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 1.1 Problem Statement
  • 1.2 Objectives
  • 1.3 Justification
  • 1.4 Delimitation
  • 2 Literature Review
  • 2.1 Hierarchical Task Analysis
  • 2.2 Mental Workload
  • 2.3 Human Error
  • 3 Methodology
  • 3.1 Stage 1 Development of the Hierarchical Task Analysis
  • 3.2 Stage 2 Mental Work Assessment
  • 3.3 Stage 3 Human Error Identification
  • 4 Results
  • 4.1 Stage 1 Development of the HTA
  • 4.2 Stage 2 Mental Work Assessment
  • 4.3 Stage 3 Human Error Identification
  • 5 Conclusions
  • 5.1 Recommendations
  • References
  • Spatial Perception
  • The Study of Sound and Shape Effects on Design
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Methods
  • 2.1 Participants
  • 2.2 Stimuli
  • 2.3 Questionnaire
  • 2.4 Experimental Process
  • 3 Results
  • 4 Discussion
  • 5 Suggestions
  • References
  • Research and Analysis on the Influence Factors of Spatial Perception Ability
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Experimental Description
  • 3 Analysis and Processing of Experimental Data
  • 3.1 The Effect of Shape on Spatial Perception
  • 3.2 Influence of Intrinsic Thinking on Spatial Perception
  • 3.3 The Effect of Gender on Spatial Perception
  • 4 Analysis of the Correlation Between the Number of Errors and the Reaction Time in the Process of Spatial Perception
  • 5 Conclusion and Discussion
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Cognitive Modeling for Robotic Assembly/Maintenance Task in Space Exploration
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 A Cognitive Assembly/Maintenance Robot Design
  • 2.1 Vision Perception Design for Cognitive Robot
  • 2.2 Mechanical Design
  • 2.3 Motion Control Algorithm
  • 2.4 Cognitive Architecture of Assembly/Maintenance Robot
  • 3 Cognitive Model for Assembly/Maintenance Robot
  • 3.1 Procedural Knowledge
  • 3.2 Cognitive Model
  • 3.3 Cognitive Control for Space Assembly/Maintenance Task
  • 4 Model Verification and Control Simulation
  • 4.1 Task Accomplishment Verification and Simulation
  • 4.2 Cognitive Details Cognitive Processes Verification
  • 5 Conclusions
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Vision and Memory
  • Analysis of Relationship Between Impression of Video and Memory Using fNIRS
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Previous Research
  • 3 Measuring Equipment
  • 4 Preliminary Experiment
  • 4.1 TVCM Used in Experiment
  • 4.2 Impression Evaluation
  • 5 Method of Experiment
  • 5.1 Subjects
  • 5.2 Flow of Experiment
  • 5.3 Presentation Stimulus
  • 6 Result of Experiment
  • 6.1 Brain Activity of Each Impression
  • 6.2 Memory Test
  • 7 Consideration
  • 8 Summary
  • References
  • Evaluate Fatigue of Blue Light Influence on General LCD, Low Blue Light LCD and OLED Displays
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Method
  • 2.1 Design
  • 2.2 Participants
  • 2.3 Materials
  • 2.4 Apparatus
  • 2.5 Procedures
  • 2.6 Data Analysis
  • 3 Results and Analysis
  • 3.1 Comparison of Visual Search Results
  • 3.2 Comparison of Critical Fusion Frequency Data Results
  • 3.3 Comparison of EEG Data
  • 3.4 Subjective Evaluation Results of Phone Screen
  • 4 Conclusions and Discussion
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Comparison of Visual Comfort and Fatigue Between Watching Different Types of 3D TVs as Measured by Eye Tracking
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Method
  • 2.1 Experimental Design
  • 2.2 Subjects
  • 2.3 Experimental Material
  • 2.4 Experimental Instruments and Environment
  • 2.5 Experimental Procedure
  • 2.6 Data Statistical Analysis
  • 3 Result Analysis
  • 3.1 Results of Subjective Evaluation of Visual Fatigue
  • 3.2 Objective Measurement Result of Visual Fatigue
  • 3.3 Discussion
  • 4 Conclusion
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • An Eye-Movement Tracking Study on Influence of Circularly Polarized Light LCD and Linearly Polarized Light LCD on Visual Perception Processing Ability for Long-Term Continuous Use
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Method
  • 2.1 Experiment Design
  • 2.2 Subject
  • 2.3 Apparatus
  • 2.4 Procedure
  • 3 Results and Analysis
  • 3.1 Comparative Analysis of the Correction of Saccadic Frequency Results of Two Groups
  • 3.2 Comparative Analysis of Visual Tracking Gain Results of the Two Groups in Two Successive Tests
  • 4 Discussion
  • 5 Conclusions
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Visual Pattern Complexity Determination for Enhanced Usability in Cognitive Testing
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Background
  • 2.1 Underlying Rationale of the Algorithm
  • 2.2 Visual Stimuli Patterns
  • 2.3 Visual Stimuli Based Tasks
  • 2.4 Database
  • 3 Algorithm Development
  • 3.1 Algorithm Overview
  • 3.2 Algorithm Design
  • 4 Results
  • 5 Conclusion
  • References
  • Effects of Background Music on Visual Lobe and Visual Search Performance
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Method
  • 2.1 Participants
  • 2.2 Apparatus and Stimulus
  • 2.3 Procedure
  • 3 Results and Discussion
  • 4 Conclusion
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • The Sound of Violin: Quantifying and Evaluating the Impact on the Performer's and Near Audience's Ear
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Rehearsals and Equipment
  • 3 Procedure
  • 4 Instrument's Calibration and Setting
  • 5 Dosimeter. Measurements in the First Rehearsal
  • 6 Dosimeter. Measurements in the Second Rehearsal
  • 7 Dosimeter. Measurements in the Third Rehearsal
  • 8 Sound Level Meter. Measurements in the First Rehearsal
  • 9 Sound Level Meter. Measurements in the Second Rehearsal
  • 10 Sound Level Meter. Measurements in the Third Rehearsal
  • 11 Conclusions
  • Reference
  • Neuroergonomics Theory and Design
  • EEG-Engagement Index and Auditory Alarm Misperception: An Inattentional Deafness Study in Actual Flight Condition
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Material and Method
  • 2.1 Participants
  • 2.2 Experimental Scenario
  • 2.3 Aircraft
  • 2.4 Neurophysiological Measurements and Analyses
  • 3 Results
  • 3.1 Behavioral Results
  • 3.2 EEG Results
  • 4 Discussion
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Aerospace Neuropsychology: Exploring the Construct of Psychological and Cognitive Interaction in the 100 Most Fatal Civil Aviation Accidents Through Multidimensional Scaling
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Method
  • 3 Results and Discussion
  • References
  • Physiological Model to Classify Physical and Cognitive Workload During Gaming Activities
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Materials and Methods
  • 2.1 Participants
  • 2.2 Experimental Procedure
  • 2.3 Equipment
  • 2.4 Tasks Description
  • 2.5 Experimental Design
  • 2.6 Signals Processing
  • 2.7 Data Normalization
  • 2.8 Model Design
  • 3 Results
  • 3.1 Workload Classification Model with the Higher Success Rate
  • 3.2 Understandable Workload Classification Model
  • 4 Conclusions
  • References
  • Predicting Stimulus-Driven Attentional Selection Within Mobile Interfaces
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 1.1 Saliency Research
  • 1.2 Mobile Display Research
  • 2 Method
  • 2.1 Participants
  • 2.2 Materials and Equipment
  • 2.3 Procedure
  • 3 Results
  • 4 Conclusion
  • 4.1 Future Work
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Evaluating ANN Efficiency in Recognizing EEG and Eye-Tracking Evoked Potentials in Visual-Game-Events
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Related Works: Classifying EEG and Psychophysiological Data Through the Use of ANN
  • 3 The Game Stimuli
  • 4 Experimental Setup
  • 5 Subjects and Experimental Procedure
  • 6 Data and ANN Preparation
  • 6.1 Data Preparation
  • 6.2 ANN Preparation
  • 6.3 Data Modelling for Recognition
  • 7 Results
  • 7.1 Accuracy Levels in Matching EEG Epochs to Game Events
  • 7.2 Precision Levels in Matching EEG Epochs to Game Events
  • 7.3 Accuracy Levels in Matching Eye-Tracking Epochs to Game Events
  • 7.4 Precision Levels in Matching Eye-Tracking Epochs to Game Events
  • 8 Discussion
  • 9 Conclusion
  • References
  • Fundamental Cognitive Workload Assessment: A Machine Learning Comparative Approach
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 1.1 Cognitive Workload
  • 1.2 Machine Learning
  • 1.3 Overview of Subsequent Sections
  • 2 Theory and Technical Background
  • 2.1 Artificial Neural Networks
  • 2.2 Support Vector Machines
  • 3 Simulation Setup
  • 3.1 Data Acquisition
  • 3.2 Algorithmic Implementation
  • 4 Results and Discussion
  • 4.1 Neural Network Results
  • 4.2 Support Vector Machines Results
  • 4.3 Discussion
  • 5 Conclusions and Future Work
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Relationship Between EEG and ECG Findings at Rest and During Brain Activity
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Experimental Method
  • 2.1 Subjects
  • 2.2 Experimental Protocol
  • 2.3 Tasks
  • 2.4 Experimental Equipment and Electrode Fixation Points
  • 3 Analysis
  • 3.1 Roken Arousal Scale (RAS)
  • 3.2 ECG
  • 3.3 EEG
  • 4 Results
  • 4.1 Auditory 2-Back Task
  • 4.2 RAS
  • 4.3 EEG
  • 4.4 ECG
  • 4.5 Relationship Between EEG and ECG
  • 5 Discussion
  • 6 Conclusion
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • Empathy in Design: A Historical and Cross-Disciplinary Perspective
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 A Historical View of Empathy
  • 2.1 From Late 19c to Early 20c
  • 2.2 From the Early 20c to the Middle 20c
  • 2.3 From 1970s to Present
  • 3 Ambiguous Aspects in the Evolvement of Empathy
  • 3.1 Affection vs. Cognition
  • 3.2 Subject-Oriented vs. Object-Oriented
  • 3.3 Attitude vs. Ability
  • 4 The Ambiguous Understandings About Empathy in Design
  • 4.1 Affection or Cognition
  • 4.2 Object-Oriented or Subject-Oriented
  • 4.3 Attitude or Technique
  • 5 Conclusion
  • References
  • A Trial of Intellectual Work Performance Estimation by Using Physiological Indices
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Physiological Indices
  • 2.1 Heart Rate Variability
  • 2.2 Pupil Diameter
  • 3 Estimation Method
  • 3.1 Support Vector Regression (SVR)
  • 3.2 Random Forest (RF)
  • 3.3 Model Calculation
  • 4 Experiment
  • 4.1 Purpose
  • 4.2 Participants
  • 4.3 Measurement of Physiological Indices
  • 4.4 Cognitive Task and Instruction of Task Performing
  • 4.5 Experimental Protocol
  • 5 Result
  • 5.1 Participant Screening
  • 5.2 Task Performance Estimation
  • 6 Discussion
  • 6.1 Estimation Methods
  • 6.2 Physiological Indices
  • 6.3 Individual Difference
  • 7 Conclusion
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • General and Systemic Structural Activity Theory
  • The Model of the Factor of Significance of Goal-Directed Decision Making
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Decision Theories
  • 3 Motivational Theories
  • 4 Systemic-Structural Theory of Activity
  • 5 The Significance Model
  • 6 Express Decision
  • 6.1 Decision Making with ED: "Hudson" vs. "TEB"
  • References
  • Applying SSAT in Computer-Based Analysis and Investigation of Operator Errors
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Preliminary
  • 3 Model of Operator Error
  • 4 Algorithms for Error Analysis
  • 5 Implementation
  • References
  • Mediating Subjective Task Complexity in Job Design: A Critical Reflection of Historicity in Self-regulatory Activity
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Notion of Self-regulation
  • 3 History-Making in Task Performance
  • 4 Mediation in Organizational Activity System
  • 5 Conclusion
  • References
  • The Emerging Cognitive Difficulties and Emotional-Motivational Challenges of Ghanaian Air Traffic Controllers: Implication for Improved Job Design
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Literature Review
  • 3 Methodological Issues
  • 3.1 Sampling Technique
  • 3.2 Data Collection Procedure
  • 3.3 Data Analysis Procedure
  • 4 Results Analyses
  • 4.1 Demographic Assessment of Study Participants
  • 4.2 Analysis of the Cognitive Aspect of Complexity in Air-Control Activity
  • 4.3 Analysis of the Workload Aspect of Complexity in Air-Control Activity
  • 4.4 Analysis of the Stress Aspect of Complexity in Air-Control Activity
  • 5 Discussion
  • 6 Conclusion
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • Studying Thinking in the Framework of SSAT
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Types of Thinking Process
  • 3 Analysis of Thinking as the Self-regulative System
  • 4 Conclusion
  • References
  • Concept of the Computer-Based Task in Production and Non-production Environment
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Basic Characteristics of Task and Their Classification
  • 3 Task Performance in Production and Non-production Environment
  • 4 Conclusion
  • References
  • Activity Approach in Management
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Management is a Multifaceted Human Activity
  • 3 The Individual Style of Activity
  • 4 The Group Environment and Individual Performance
  • 5 Clear and Systematic Communication
  • 6 Conclusion
  • References
  • Cognitive Computing and Internet of Things: Techniques and Applications
  • Personalized Instructions for Self-reflective Smart Objects
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Ambient Reflection
  • 2.1 Ambient Reflection Framework
  • 3 Analysis
  • 3.1 Usability Context
  • 3.2 Requirements for Personalized Instructions
  • 3.3 User Profiles
  • 3.4 Rule-Based Description Languages
  • 4 Concept and Realization
  • 4.1 User Profile
  • 4.2 Transformation in Personalized Instructions
  • 4.3 Delivery Coordination
  • 5 Evaluation
  • 5.1 Comparison of Multiple Distance Metrics
  • 5.2 Delivery Coordination
  • 6 Conclusion
  • References
  • The Human Nervous System as a Model for Function Allocation in Human-Automation Interaction
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Automation
  • 2.1 Adaptive Automation
  • 2.2 Brain-Computer Interaction (BCI)
  • 3 Human Physical and Mental Roles in Automation Systems
  • 3.1 Physical Work
  • 3.2 Mental Work
  • 4 Conclusion
  • References
  • Citizen Science Involving Collections of Standardized Community Data
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 1.1 Related Work
  • 1.1.1 Citizen Science (CS) - A Volunteered Geographic Information (VGI) Subset
  • 1.1.2 Citizen Science (CS) and the Growth in Electronic Communication
  • 1.1.3 The Wisdom of Crowds
  • 1.1.4 Localness Assumptions in Volunteered Geographic Information (VGI)
  • 1.1.5 Controlled Vocabulary (CV) and a Lightweight Ontology (LA)
  • 1.1.6 Semantic Interoperability and Shared Controlled Vocabularies
  • 1.2 The Objective of the Present Study
  • 1.3 An Attempt to Integrate "Crowd-Sourced" and "Official" Knowledge
  • 1.4 Structure and Organization of the Paper
  • 2 Methodology
  • 2.1 Applied Approaches
  • 2.2 Delimitation
  • 3 Results
  • 3.1 (RQ0) Why is Semantics Important?
  • 3.2 (RQ1) What is a Language? What are the Language Elements?
  • 3.3 (RQ2) What is Vocabulary?
  • 3.4 (RQ3) What Can be Concluded from Questions (RQ1) and (RQ2)?
  • 3.5 (RQ4) Why are There Difficulties in Using Well-Defined Languages for Data Collections?
  • 3.6 (RQ5) How Does the Description of the Standardized Data Affect the Contribution Made by CS?
  • 4 Discussion
  • 5 Conclusion
  • References
  • The Signs of Semiotic Engineering in the IoT Interaction Design
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 IoT (Internet of Things)
  • 2.1 HCI in IoT
  • 3 Semiotic Engineering
  • 4 IoT Interaction Design and Semiotic Engineering
  • 5 Validation
  • 6 Discussion and Conclusion
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Thing to Service: Perspectives from a Network of Things
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Context for Network Management
  • 2.1 Characteristics of Complex Domains
  • 2.2 Case Study of the FAA National Airspace System (NAS)
  • 3 Designing Maintenance Systems
  • 3.1 System Requirements
  • 3.2 Tools
  • 3.3 Standards and Guidelines
  • 3.4 Models
  • 4 The Thing to Service Model
  • 5 Future Research
  • 6 Conclusion
  • References
  • Designing a Cognitive Concierge Service for Hospitals
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Application to In-Patient Concierge Service
  • 3 Solution Architecture
  • 4 Design Considerations in a Hospital Environment
  • 4.1 Sensitive Personal Information
  • 4.2 Controlling Equipment in a Hospital Environment
  • 4.3 Importance of Training Cognitive Services
  • 5 Ergonomic and Hygiene Considerations
  • 5.1 Speaker Design Challenges
  • 6 Future Directions
  • 6.1 Future Vision
  • 6.2 Building a Cognitive Platform
  • 7 Summary and Conclusion
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • Author Index

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