Reactive Polymer Blending

 
 
Hanser, Carl (Verlag)
  • 1. Auflage
  • |
  • erschienen am 18. März 2013
  • |
  • 400 Seiten
 
E-Book | PDF mit Wasserzeichen-DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-3-446-40174-7 (ISBN)
 
Major advancement has occurred in preparing useful polymer blends, in most cases using some form of compatibilization. While physical compatibilization using block copolymers was the technique of choice in the past, increasingly reactive approaches have been used. Much enabling technology is required to produce commercially viable blends including compatibilization chemistry, blend rheology, process equipment and morphology control. This volume is particularly suitable for students as a graduate level textbook and for practitioners trying to optimize these products and processes.
Contents
-Types of Reactive Polymers which Have Been Investigated
-Chemistry of Compatibilization Reactions
-In-Situ Interfacial Reactions - Kinetics and Interfacial Thickness
-Molecular Architecture of Reactive Compatibilizing Polymers
-Effects of Interfacial Reactions on Phase Morphology Development
-Effects of Rheology on Phase Morphology Development
-Phase Inversions in Blending
-Role of Mixing Mechanisms and Devices in Reactive Blending
-Extruders Used in Reactive Blending
-One-Step and Two-Step Reactive Blending Processes
-Reactive Blending of Polyamides
-Principles and Examples of Toughening
-Reactive Blend Compatibilization Using Small Molecules
  • Englisch
  • München
  • |
  • Deutschland
  • 18,31 MB
978-3-446-40174-7 (9783446401747)
3446401741 (3446401741)
http://dx.doi.org/10.3139/9783446401747
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
1 - Foreword [Seite 8]
2 - Contents [Seite 10]
3 - Contributors [Seite 14]
4 - Preface [Seite 16]
5 - 1 Introduction [Seite 18]
5.1 - 1.1 Background [Seite 19]
5.2 - 1.2 Important Blending Principles [Seite 20]
5.3 - 1.3 A Historical Perspective on Reactive Blending [Seite 24]
5.4 - 1.4 The Evolution of Commercial Practice [Seite 26]
5.4.1 - 1.4.1 Patents and Products [Seite 26]
5.4.2 - 1.4.2 Processing [Seite 27]
5.5 - 1.5 Summary [Seite 28]
5.6 - References [Seite 28]
6 - 2 Types of Reactive Polymers Used in Blending [Seite 30]
6.1 - 2.1 Introduction [Seite 31]
6.2 - 2.2 Compatibility in Polymer Blends [Seite 32]
6.2.1 - 2.2.1 Basic Concepts [Seite 32]
6.2.2 - 2.2.2 Strategies for Blend Compatibilization [Seite 32]
6.3 - 2.3 Preparation of Reactive Polymers [Seite 34]
6.4 - 2.4 Types of Compatibilizing Reactions [Seite 36]
6.5 - 2.5 Types of Reactive Polymers and Their Applications [Seite 36]
6.5.1 - 2.5.1 Reactive Polymers Having MAn Functionality [Seite 37]
6.5.2 - 2.5.2 Reactive Polymers with Carboxylic Acid Functionality [Seite 39]
6.5.3 - 2.5.3 Reactive Polymers Capable of Interchange Reactions [Seite 41]
6.5.4 - 2.5.4 Reactive Polymers Containing Primary and Secondary Amines [Seite 43]
6.5.5 - 2.5.5 Reactive Polymers Containing Hydroxyl Groups [Seite 43]
6.5.6 - 2.5.6 Reactive Polymers Containing Heterocyclic Groups [Seite 46]
6.5.7 - 2.5.7 Reactive Polymers Capable of Ionic Interactions [Seite 48]
6.5.8 - 2.5.8 Miscellaneous Reactive Polymers [Seite 48]
6.6 - 2.6 Concluding Remarks [Seite 49]
6.7 - List of Abbreviations [Seite 51]
6.8 - References [Seite 52]
7 - 3 Reactive Blending with Immiscible Functional Polymers: Molecular, Morphological, and Interfacial Aspects [Seite 60]
7.1 - 3.1 Introduction [Seite 61]
7.2 - 3.2 Reactive Versus Physical Blending with Respect to Compatibilization [Seite 61]
7.2.1 - 3.2.1 Similarities and Differences [Seite 61]
7.2.2 - 3.2.2 Industrial Feasibility and Current Trends [Seite 63]
7.3 - 3.3 In Situ Interfacial Chemical Reactions of Functional Polymers [Seite 64]
7.3.1 - 3.3.1 Types of In Situ Chemical Reactions Involved [Seite 64]
7.3.2 - 3.3.2 Kinetics of Interfacial Reactions and Molecular Characterization [Seite 66]
7.4 - 3.4 Effects of Reactive Blending on Phase Morphology [Seite 70]
7.4.1 - 3.4.1 Effect of Reactive Blending on Phase Morphology Generation [Seite 70]
7.4.2 - 3.4.2 Effect of Reactive Blending on Phase Stabilisation in the Melt [Seite 80]
7.4.3 - 3.4.3 Effect of Reactive Blending on Phase Co-Continuity [Seite 81]
7.4.4 - 3.4.4 Interfacial Stability of the In Situ Formed Copolymer [Seite 84]
7.5 - 3.5 Effect of Reactive Blending on Crystallization of Blends Containing Crystallizable Components [Seite 84]
7.6 - 3.6 Blend Interface Characterization [Seite 86]
7.6.1 - 3.6.1 General Aspects Concerning Polymer/Polymer Interfaces [Seite 86]
7.6.2 - 3.6.2 Determination of the Interfacial Tension in Reactively Compatibilized Blends [Seite 89]
7.6.3 - 3.6.3 Determination of the Interfacial Thickness in Reactive Blends [Seite 91]
7.7 - 3.7 General Conclusions [Seite 95]
7.8 - References [Seite 96]
8 - 4 Key Role of Structural Features of Compatibilizing Polymer Additives in Reactive Blending [Seite 99]
8.1 - 4.1 Introduction [Seite 100]
8.2 - 4.2 General Principles [Seite 102]
8.3 - 4.3 Molecular Architecture of the Compatibilizer [Seite 102]
8.3.1 - 4.3.1 Alternative 1 [Seite 103]
8.3.2 - 4.3.2 Alternative 2 [Seite 103]
8.3.3 - 4.3.3 Alternative 3 [Seite 104]
8.4 - 4.4 Phase Morphology Development [Seite 104]
8.5 - 4.5 Effect of the Interfacial Reaction on the Phase Morphology Development [Seite 106]
8.6 - 4.6 Effect of the Molecular Characteristic Features of the Reactive Polymers [Seite 107]
8.6.1 - 4.6.1 Kinetics of the Interfacial Reaction [Seite 107]
8.6.2 - 4.6.2 Molecular Weight of the Compatibilizer Precursors [Seite 112]
8.6.3 - 4.6.3 Reactive Group Content of the Reacting Polymers [Seite 115]
8.6.4 - 4.6.4 Distribution of the Reactive Groups Along the Chains [Seite 121]
8.7 - 4.7 Effect of Processing Conditions [Seite 122]
8.7.1 - 4.7.1 Melting Order of the Constitutive Components of Reactive Polyblends [Seite 122]
8.7.2 - 4.7.2 Effect of Shearing [Seite 123]
8.7.3 - 4.7.3 Initial State of Dispersion [Seite 124]
8.7.4 - 4.7.4 Mixing Temperature [Seite 124]
8.8 - 4.8 Conclusions [Seite 125]
8.9 - References [Seite 126]
9 - 5 Morphological and Rheological Aspects of Reactive Polymer Blending [Seite 130]
9.1 - 5.1 Morphology Development During Blending of Immiscible Polymers [Seite 131]
9.1.1 - 5.1.1 The Melting Regime [Seite 133]
9.1.2 - 5.1.2 The Melt Flow Regime [Seite 137]
9.1.3 - 5.1.3 Final Morphology of Reactive Blends [Seite 144]
9.1.4 - 5.1.4 Miscible Reactive Polymer Blends [Seite 149]
9.2 - 5.2 Rheological Aspects of Reactive Polymer Blending [Seite 149]
9.2.1 - 5.2.1 Rheological Changes During Blending [Seite 149]
9.2.2 - 5.2.2 Rheology of Reactively Compatibilized Polymer Blends [Seite 151]
9.3 - 5.3 Conclusions [Seite 155]
9.4 - 5.4 Future Challenges [Seite 156]
9.5 - References [Seite 156]
10 - 6 Reactive Blending in Screw Extruders [Seite 159]
10.1 - 6.1 Introduction [Seite 160]
10.2 - 6.2 Reactive Blending in Mixers [Seite 161]
10.2.1 - 6.2.1 Copolymer Formation at Polymer/Polymer Interfaces [Seite 162]
10.2.2 - 6.2.2 Batch Mixers for Reactive Blending [Seite 171]
10.2.3 - 6.2.3 Reactive Blending in Screw Extruders [Seite 175]
10.3 - 6.4 One-Step and Two-Step Reactive Blending Processes [Seite 187]
10.3.1 - 6.4.1 PP/PA6 Blends [Seite 188]
10.3.2 - 6.4.2 PP/PBT Blends [Seite 191]
10.4 - 6.5 Concluding Remarks [Seite 194]
10.5 - References [Seite 195]
11 - 7 Extrusion Equipment for Reactive Blending [Seite 197]
11.1 - 7.1 Extruders Used for Reactive Blending [Seite 198]
11.2 - 7.2 Mixing Mechanism [Seite 202]
11.2.1 - 7.2.1 Distributive and Dispersive Mixing [Seite 203]
11.2.2 - 7.2.2 Dissipative Melting [Seite 205]
11.3 - 7.3 Residence Time and Residence Time Distribution [Seite 210]
11.4 - 7.4 Devolatilization [Seite 211]
11.5 - 7.5 Microstructure Development and Monitoring in Reactive Blending [Seite 214]
11.6 - 7.6 Hybridized Polymer Processing Systems [Seite 218]
11.7 - 7.7 Conclusions [Seite 221]
11.8 - References [Seite 222]
12 - 8 Rubber Toughening of Polyamides by Reactive Blending [Seite 224]
12.1 - 8.1 Introduction [Seite 225]
12.2 - 8.2 Evolution of Polyamide Impact Modification Technology [Seite 229]
12.3 - 8.3 Comparison of Reactivity vs. Toughening Efficiency of Various Functional Rubbers [Seite 233]
12.4 - 8.4 Toughening Efficiency of Maleated EP Rubbers [Seite 241]
12.4.1 - 8.4.1 Effect of Maleic Anhydride Content [Seite 241]
12.4.2 - 8.4.2 Effect of Polyamide End Groups [Seite 243]
12.5 - 8.5 Toughening Efficiency of Maleated Styrene-Ethylene/Butylene-Styrene (M-SEBS) Block Copolymer Rubbers [Seite 248]
12.6 - 8.6 Effect of Mixtures of Reactive and Non-Reactive (Maleated and Unmaleated) Rubbers [Seite 253]
12.7 - 8.7 Reactive Toughening of PA6 with Acyllactam-Grafted EP Rubbers [Seite 254]
12.8 - 8.8 Toughening of Polyamides with Maleated LDPE [Seite 256]
12.9 - 8.9 High Impact Polyamide/ABS Blend [Seite 258]
12.10 - 8.10 Toughening Mechanisms in Rubber Modified Polyamides [Seite 260]
12.10.1 - 8.10.1 Role of Rubber Particle Size on Polyamide Toughness [Seite 260]
12.10.2 - 8.10.2 Role of Rubber Particle Cavitation on the PA Matrix Toughening [Seite 262]
12.11 - 8.11 Rubber Toughening of Reinforced Polyamides [Seite 263]
12.12 - 8.12 Applications of Rubber Toughened Polyamide [Seite 264]
12.13 - 8.13 High Rubber/Polyamide Blends [Seite 265]
12.14 - 8.14 Polyamide/Reactive Rubber Blending Process [Seite 267]
12.15 - 8.16 Future Directions in Rubber Toughened Polyamides [Seite 268]
12.16 - References [Seite 269]
13 - 9 Compatibilization Using Low Molecular Weight Reactive Additives [Seite 271]
13.1 - 9.1 Introduction [Seite 272]
13.2 - 9.2 Free Radical Reactivity and Compatibilization of Polyolefins [Seite 273]
13.3 - 9.3 Polyethylene/Polystyrene Compatibilization [Seite 276]
13.4 - 9.4 Compatibilization of Polyolefin/Polyamide Blends [Seite 280]
13.5 - 9.5 Development of the Vector Fluid Compatibilization Concept [Seite 283]
13.6 - 9.6 Special Peroxide [Seite 289]
13.7 - 9.7 Inorganic Catalyst for PE/PS Compatibilization [Seite 290]
13.8 - 9.8 A Recent Example [Seite 294]
13.9 - 9.9 Summary [Seite 296]
13.10 - References [Seite 296]
14 - Index [Seite 298]

Dateiformat: PDF
Kopierschutz: Wasserzeichen-DRM (Digital Rights Management)

Systemvoraussetzungen:

Computer (Windows; MacOS X; Linux): Verwenden Sie zum Lesen die kostenlose Software Adobe Reader, Adobe Digital Editions oder einen anderen PDF-Viewer Ihrer Wahl (siehe E-Book Hilfe).

Tablet/Smartphone (Android; iOS): Installieren Sie die kostenlose App Adobe Digital Editions oder eine andere Lese-App für E-Books (siehe E-Book Hilfe).

E-Book-Reader: Bookeen, Kobo, Pocketbook, Sony, Tolino u.v.a.m. (nur bedingt: Kindle)

Das Dateiformat PDF zeigt auf jeder Hardware eine Buchseite stets identisch an. Daher ist eine PDF auch für ein komplexes Layout geeignet, wie es bei Lehr- und Fachbüchern verwendet wird (Bilder, Tabellen, Spalten, Fußnoten). Bei kleinen Displays von E-Readern oder Smartphones sind PDF leider eher nervig, weil zu viel Scrollen notwendig ist. Mit Wasserzeichen-DRM wird hier ein "weicher" Kopierschutz verwendet. Daher ist technisch zwar alles möglich - sogar eine unzulässige Weitergabe. Aber an sichtbaren und unsichtbaren Stellen wird der Käufer des E-Books als Wasserzeichen hinterlegt, sodass im Falle eines Missbrauchs die Spur zurückverfolgt werden kann.

Weitere Informationen finden Sie in unserer E-Book Hilfe.


Download (sofort verfügbar)

149,99 €
inkl. 19% MwSt.
Download / Einzel-Lizenz
PDF mit Wasserzeichen-DRM
siehe Systemvoraussetzungen
E-Book bestellen

Unsere Web-Seiten verwenden Cookies. Mit der Nutzung dieser Web-Seiten erklären Sie sich damit einverstanden. Mehr Informationen finden Sie in unserem Datenschutzhinweis. Ok