Developing New Functional Food and Nutraceutical Products

 
 
Academic Press
  • 1. Auflage
  • |
  • erschienen am 19. September 2016
  • |
  • 544 Seiten
 
E-Book | ePUB mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-0-12-802779-0 (ISBN)
 

Developing New Functional Food and Nutraceutical Products provides critical information from conceptualization of new products to marketing, aiming to present a solid understanding of the entire process through detailed coverage of key concepts, namely innovation, regulation, manufacturing, quality control, and marketing.

Chapters provide insights into market and competitive analysis, product design and development, intellectual property, ingredient sourcing, cost control, and sales and marketing strategies.


  • Examines key considerations in product development
  • Provides a streamlined approach for product development
  • Addresses manufacturing and quality control challenges
  • Includes key lessons for a successful product launch and effective marketing
  • Englisch
  • San Diego
  • |
  • USA
Elsevier Science
  • 11,83 MB
978-0-12-802779-0 (9780128027790)
0128027797 (0128027797)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
  • Cover
  • Title Page
  • Copyright Page
  • Dedication
  • Contents
  • Contributors
  • Preface
  • Chapter 1 - Growth patterns and emerging opportunities in nutraceutical and functional food categories: market overview
  • 1.1 - Introduction
  • 1.2 - Trend one: the power of convergence to change a marketplace
  • 1.2.1 - Category convergence
  • 1.2.2 - Channel convergence
  • 1.2.3 - Technology convergence
  • 1.2.4 - Consumer convergence
  • 1.3 - Trend two: functional foods and beverages
  • 1.3.1 - What is a functional food?
  • 1.3.2 - How big is this sector?
  • 1.3.3 - What sales channels are performing best?
  • 1.3.4 - Searching for naturally functional ingredients
  • 1.3.5 - Functional versus inherently functional
  • 1.3.6 - Revisiting food/supplement convergence
  • 1.3.7 - Doctor, doctor
  • 1.3.8 - Not so easy
  • 1.3.9 - Why do new products fail?
  • 1.3.10 - Regulatory roadblocks
  • 1.3.11 - A sweet story
  • 1.3.12 - Oh to be green and sustainable
  • 1.3.13 - Super fruits still going strong
  • 1.3.14 - Just add spice
  • 1.3.15 - Ingredient power players
  • 1.3.16 - Keep it simple for the consumer
  • 1.3.17 - Taste comes first
  • 1.3.18 - Closing the gap
  • 1.4 - Trend three: growth in cobranding activity
  • 1.4.1 - Is branding always the right strategy?
  • 1.4.2 - Survey the market and act accordingly
  • 1.4.3 - Consistently communicate the key brand messages
  • 1.4.4 - Work to create brand value
  • 1.5 - Trend four: increased importance of science and clinical validation
  • 1.5.1 - Marketing science to trade and consumer audiences
  • 1.5.2 - Integrate science into the brand positioning
  • 1.5.2.1 - Tell a story
  • 1.5.2.2 - Use metaphors
  • 1.5.2.3 - Reach different parts of the brain
  • 1.5.2.3.1 - Visuals
  • 1.5.2.3.1.1 - The connection between seeing and remembering
  • 1.5.2.3.1.2 - Making words visual
  • 1.5.2.3.2 - Audio
  • 1.5.2.3.2.1 - The brain remembers what it hears and sees
  • 1.5.2.4 - Video
  • 1.5.3 - Break it up
  • 1.5.3.1 - Use repetition
  • 1.5.4 - Name that structure
  • 1.5.5 - Summarize the findings
  • 1.5.6 - Reach them at the right place and time
  • 1.5.6.1 - The right place (the doctor's office)
  • 1.5.6.2 - The right time (prerecorded podcasts and webinars)
  • 1.6 - Trend five: more brands touting sustainability and eco-friendly messaging
  • 1.6.1 - What is green or sustainable?
  • 1.7 - Trend six: the emergence of the active nutrition category
  • 1.7.1 - Actively tuned-in
  • 1.7.2 - Performance driven
  • 1.7.3 - Gracefully maturing
  • 1.7.4 - Driven to lose
  • 1.8 - Trend seven: innovation in dosage and delivery formats
  • 1.8.1 - Pill fatigue-not just for seniors
  • 1.8.2 - What are the key consumer drivers?
  • 1.8.3 - What's social got to do with it?
  • 1.8.4 - Targeting specific consumer segments with delivery technology
  • 1.8.5 - So what?
  • 1.9 - Trend eight: how millennials are changing the conversation and the marketplace
  • 1.9.1 - So what's all the fuss about millennials?
  • 1.9.2 - Millennials are the next consumer wave for healthy lifestyle products
  • 1.9.3 - Millennials want and demand both choice and engagement
  • 1.9.4 - Millennials have a peculiar relationship with brands
  • 1.9.5 - Millennials look at health and wellness differently
  • 1.9.6 - Millennials value user-generated content (UGC)
  • 1.9.7 - Why does social media matter?
  • 1.9.8 - Storytelling is key to reaching and persuading millennials
  • 1.9.9 - A word of caution
  • Chapter 2 - Market analysis and concept development of functional foods
  • 2.1 - Introduction
  • 2.2 - Functional foods: key markets, consumer trends, and new product trends
  • 2.3 - Marketing and technological challenges for the conceptualization of new products
  • 2.3.1 - NPD trends and challenges within the functional foods industry
  • 2.3.2 - NPD process for functional foods and beverages
  • 2.3.3 - Developing foods for aging consumers
  • 2.4 - Conceptualization of new products: case study on concept development of functional foods for aging consumers
  • 2.4.1 - Introduction to the case study
  • 2.4.2 - User-centered design methodology
  • 2.4.3 - Data analysis
  • 2.4.4 - Conceptualization through user-centered design
  • 2.4.4.1 Attribute 1: product concept health concerns
  • 2.4.4.2 Attribute 2: food and beverage carriers
  • 2.4.4.3 Attribute 3: product concept packaging
  • 2.4.4.4 Attribute 4: product concept marketing messages
  • 2.4.4.5 Attribute 5: product concept health claims
  • 2.4.4.6 Group 1 composite product concept
  • 2.5 - Conclusions
  • Summary
  • References
  • Chapter 3 - Marketing challenges and strategies
  • 3.1 - Introduction
  • 3.2 - Early development of functional food and current status
  • 3.3 - Objective of functional food
  • 3.4 - Upstream Marketing
  • 3.4.1 - Preconditions for sale of nutraceuticals and functional foods
  • 3.4.1.1 - Copyright, patents, and trademarks
  • 3.4.1.2 - Brand
  • 3.4.1.3 - Global competition
  • 3.4.1.4 - Awareness program
  • 3.4.1.5 - Market survey
  • 3.4.1.6 - Ascertainment of toxic limit
  • 3.4.1.7 - Permission, clearance, and regulatory approvals from various authorities
  • 3.4.1.8 - Budget
  • 3.4.1.9 - Distribution network
  • 3.4.1.10 - Packaging
  • 3.4.2 - Steps to be followed after clearance of all compliances
  • 3.5 - Downstream marketing
  • 3.5.1 - Key factors for successful product marketing
  • 3.6 - Creating brand value
  • 3.7 - Effective advertising
  • 3.7.1 - Formats of advertising
  • 3.7.1.1 - Ads based on age
  • 3.7.1.2 - Ads based on similar habits
  • 3.7.1.3 - Ads based on location
  • 3.7.2 - Forms of advertising
  • 3.8 - Challenges with advertising functional foods
  • 3.9 - Analysis of minds of customers
  • 3.10 - Risk factors analysis
  • 3.11 - A few examples
  • 3.11.1 - Weight loss
  • 3.11.2 - Prevention of skin wrinkling
  • 3.12 - Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 4 - The strategic viewpoints of innovation and marketing teams on the development of novel functional foods
  • 4.1 - Introduction
  • 4.2 - Innovation of functional food products
  • 4.2.1 - Understanding innovation
  • 4.2.2 - A supplier view
  • 4.2.3 - An integrated view
  • 4.3 - Marketing of functional food products: understanding the consumer
  • 4.3.1 - Extant research: the product at center-stage
  • 4.3.2 - An integrated view: the customer as a cocreator/"business partner"
  • 4.4 - Drivers and barriers to industry development
  • References
  • Chapter 5 - Food safety: marketing trends intended for consumer awareness and partnership
  • 5.1 - Introduction
  • 5.2 - Factors influencing food choices
  • 5.2.1 - Biological
  • 5.2.2 - Economic and physical
  • 5.2.3 - Social
  • 5.2.4 - Psychological
  • 5.2.5 - Attitudinal
  • 5.3 - Megatrends in marketing awareness
  • 5.3.1 - Recent policy initiatives directing food safety awareness
  • 5.3.2 - At the forefront of food technology
  • 5.3.3 - Wellness and lifestyle
  • 5.3.4 - Convenience
  • 5.3.4.1 - Sensible snacking
  • 5.3.4.2 - Flexible food packaging, meal preparation, and health beverages
  • 5.4 - Behavioral interventions
  • 5.4.1 - Social
  • 5.4.2 - Dietary patterns and practices
  • 5.4.3 - Environmental
  • 5.5 - Generating awareness: the consumer as partner in food safety
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • Chapter 6 - Intellectual property considerations
  • 6.1 - Introduction
  • 6.2 - Patents
  • 6.2.1 - Developing a patent portfolio
  • 6.2.2 - Enforcement considerations
  • 6.2.3 - Risk management and defense considerations
  • 6.3 - Trade secrets
  • 6.4 - Trademarks
  • 6.5 - Copyright
  • 6.6 - Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 7 - Regulatory constraints on new product development and approval procedures in the United States
  • 7.1 - Introduction
  • 7.2 - Product formulation
  • 7.2.1 - Conventional foods
  • 7.2.2 - Medical foods
  • 7.2.3 - Dietary supplements
  • 7.2.3.1 - Old dietary ingredients
  • 7.2.3.2 - New dietary ingredients
  • 7.2.4 - Specific constraints on formulation
  • 7.2.4.1 - Upper limits and safety limits
  • 7.2.4.2 - Banned ingredients
  • 7.2.4.3 - Ingredients that are also used in drug products
  • 7.2.4.4 - Required warning statements
  • 7.2.4.5 - Industry recommended warning statements
  • 7.2.4.6 - Liquid dietary supplements
  • 7.3 - Product manufacturing
  • 7.3.1 - Facility registration
  • 7.3.2 - Good manufacturing practices (GMPs)
  • 7.4 - Product claims
  • 7.4.1 - Product claims defined by regulation
  • 7.4.1.1 - Structure function claims
  • 7.4.1.1.1 - 403(r)(6) Notifications
  • 7.4.1.2 - Health claims
  • 7.4.1.2.1 - NLEA authorized health claims
  • 7.4.1.2.2 - Health claims based on authoritative statements
  • 7.4.1.2.3 - Qualified health claims
  • 7.4.1.3 - Nutrient content claims
  • 7.4.1.4 - Other claims
  • 7.4.1.4.1 - "Healthy"
  • 7.4.1.4.2 - Antioxidant claims
  • 7.4.1.4.3 - "Gluten-free"
  • 7.4.1.4.4 - "Organic"
  • 7.4.2 - Litigated claims that may become regulated
  • 7.4.2.1 - "Natural"
  • 7.4.2.2 - "Non-GMO"
  • 7.5 - Conclusions
  • References
  • Statutes, Regulations, and Cases
  • Guidance Documents
  • Webpages
  • FDA Warning Letters
  • Chapter 8 - Formulations and challenges: a special emphasis on stability and safety evaluations
  • 8.1 - Introduction
  • 8.2 - Nutraceuticals formulation and design
  • 8.2.1 - Isolation of nutraceuticals from natural sources
  • 8.2.2 - Liposomal carrier systems
  • 8.2.3 - Microsponges and nanosponges
  • 8.2.4 - Cyclodextrin complexation
  • 8.2.5 - Biodegradable hydrogels
  • 8.2.6 - Nanotechnology-based formulations for nutraceutical delivery
  • 8.2.7 - Solid dispersions
  • 8.3 - Challenges in the formulation of food supplements
  • 8.3.1 - Poor aqueous solubility
  • 8.3.2 - High melting point of nutraceuticals
  • 8.3.3 - Chemical instability
  • 8.3.4 - Probiotic compounds
  • 8.4 - Risks and safety
  • 8.4.1 - Characterization of the molecules
  • 8.4.2 - Addition of chemical inhibitors during formulation
  • 8.4.3 - Control of degradation due to light scattering and absorption
  • 8.4.4 - Controlled or targeted release
  • 8.4.5 - Regulatory measures
  • 8.5 - Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 9 - Nutraceutical Formulations and Challenges
  • 9.1 - Introduction
  • 9.2 - Nutraceutical formulation
  • 9.3 - Challenges and opportunities
  • 9.4 - Stability and safety of nutraceuticals
  • 9.5 - Indian market
  • 9.6 - Global regulatory market
  • 9.7 - Current scenario
  • 9.8 - Future prospects
  • 9.9 - Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 10 - Sourcing, supply chain, and manufacturing of nutraceutical and functional foods
  • 10.1 - Introduction statement
  • 10.2 - Scope and opportunity
  • 10.3 - Manufacturing
  • 10.3.1 - Preconditions for manufacturing of nutraceuticals/functional foods
  • 10.3.2 - Activities of various departments for manufacturing of product
  • 10.3.3 - Planning
  • 10.3.4 - Procurement/buyer
  • 10.3.5 - Quality/quantity check
  • 10.3.6 - Warehousing
  • 10.4 - Manufacturing/execution
  • 10.4.1 - Quality control measures
  • 10.4.2 - Packaging, warehousing, and distribution
  • 10.4.3 - Manpower and safety measures
  • 10.4.4 - Pollution control measures
  • 10.4.5 - Risk factors from manufacturing
  • 10.5 - Outsourcing
  • 10.5.1 - Conditions for outsourcing
  • 10.5.2 - Pricing
  • 10.5.3 - Quality
  • 10.5.4 - Quantity
  • 10.5.5 - Consistent supply
  • 10.5.6 - Other factors for outsourcing
  • 10.6 - Supply chain management
  • 10.6.1 - Vendor management
  • 10.7 - Inventory management
  • 10.7.1 - Can nutraceutical companies control the supply chain and emerge as leaders?
  • 10.7.2 - Factors for future success
  • 10.8 - Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 11 - Raw materials analysis and quality control
  • 11.1 - Introduction
  • 11.2 - Classification of raw materials
  • 11.3 - Prerequisites for raw materials analysis
  • 11.4 - Basics of analytical methods
  • 11.5 - Analysis of the raw materials
  • 11.5.1 - Water analysis
  • 11.5.2 - Animal- and plant-based materials
  • 11.6 - Authentication methods
  • 11.7 - Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 12 - Strategize the research investigations: pre-clinical and clinical evaluations
  • 12.1 - Introduction
  • 12.2 - Toxicological investigations
  • 12.2.1 - Toxicokinetics studies
  • 12.2.1.1 - Tier 1: absorption studies
  • 12.2.1.2 - Tier 2: single dose distribution, metabolism, and excretion studies
  • 12.2.1.3 - Tier 3: repeated administration toxicokinetic studies
  • 12.2.2 - Subchronic, chronic, and carcinogenicity toxicity studies
  • 12.2.2.1 - Tier 1: subchronic toxicity studies
  • 12.2.2.2 - Tier 2: chronic toxicity studies
  • 12.2.2.3 - Tier 3: carcinogenicity studies
  • 12.2.3 - Genotoxicity
  • 12.2.3.1 - Tier 1: in vitro genotoxicity studies
  • 12.2.3.2 - Tier 2: in vivo genotoxicity studies
  • 12.2.4 - Reproductive and developmental toxicity
  • 12.2.4.1 - Tier 1: toxicokinetics and 90-day subchronic toxicity studies
  • 12.2.4.2 - Tier 2: reproductive and developmental toxicity studies
  • 12.2.4.3 - Tier 3: extended reproductive and developmental toxicity studies
  • 12.2.5 - Human studies
  • 12.3 - Efficacy evaluation
  • 12.3.1 - Preclinical research
  • 12.3.2 - Clinical trials
  • 12.4 - Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 13 - Concepts of flavor creation in novel nutraceuticals and functional food formulations
  • 13.1 - Introduction
  • 13.2 - Why is flavor important in nutraceuticals and functional foods?
  • 13.3 - What is flavor?
  • 13.4 - Legal definitions
  • 13.4.1 - 21 CFR101.22(a)(3)
  • 13.5 - Flavor chemistry
  • 13.6 - Sources of flavoring materials
  • 13.7 - Forms of flavors
  • 13.8 - Challenges to flavoring functional foods and nutraceuticals
  • 13.9 - Base strategies
  • 13.10 - Strategies for the finished product
  • 13.11 - Bitter blocking
  • 13.12 - Masking
  • 13.13 - Choice of flavorings
  • 13.14 - Processing and other considerations
  • 13.15 - Labelling and other marketing considerations
  • 13.16 - Working with a flavor house
  • 13.17 - If you want to do your own flavoring of bases
  • 13.18 - Partnering with a flavor company
  • References
  • Chapter 14 - Product design for bread through mind genomics and cognitive economics
  • 14.1 - A short background about mind genomics and cognitive economics
  • 14.2 - A short introduction to mind genomics
  • 14.3 - Pragmatics-doing the mind genomics/cognitive economics study
  • 14.4 - The raw materials
  • 14.5 - The experimental design
  • 14.6 - The rating questions
  • 14.7 - Executing the interview
  • 14.8 - The respondents
  • 14.9 - Levels of learning
  • 14.10 - Building models
  • 14.11 - The interest and dollar models for the total panel
  • 14.12 - The emergent cognitive economics narrative
  • 14.13 - From total panel to key subgroups
  • 14.14 - Underlying mind-sets in the population uncovered by mind-set segmentation
  • 14.14.1 - Strong-performing elements from segment S1: European, artisan seekers
  • 14.14.2 - Strong-performing elements from segment S2: healthful, simple, fresh
  • 14.14.3 - Strong-performing elements from segment S3: bread with a history
  • 14.15 - The relation between interest (INT) and dollar value (price) differs across segments
  • 14.16 - Differences among segments arise from the patterns of interest and value
  • 14.17 - The importance of sensory/emotional attributes
  • 14.18 - Mixing messages to raise interest and value: mind genomics, cognitive economics, and communicating artisanal bread
  • 14.19 - Conclusions
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter 15 - Global market entry regulations for nutraceuticals, functional foods, dietary/food/health supplements
  • 15.1 - Introduction
  • 15.2 - Market entry requirements
  • 15.2.1 - Positive and negative ingredient lists
  • 15.2.2 - Botanicals
  • 15.2.3 - Notification versus registration
  • References
  • Chapter 16 - US regulation of food label claims
  • 16.1 - Overview
  • 16.2 - FDA's authority for regulating food label claims
  • 16.3 - Health claims
  • 16.3.1 - Validity standard of health claims
  • 16.3.2 - General health claim regulation
  • 16.3.3 - Authorized health claims
  • 16.3.4 - Qualified health claims
  • 16.4 - Structure/function claims
  • 16.5 - Nutrient content claims
  • References
  • Chapter 17 - Nutraceutical and functional food regulations in the European Union
  • 17.1 - Introduction
  • 17.2 - The EU's legislation and policy on food
  • 17.3 - Food definition according to the EU
  • 17.4 - Definition of food improvement agents according to the EU
  • 17.4.1 - Food additives
  • 17.4.2 - Food enzymes
  • 17.4.3 - Flavorings
  • 17.4.4 - Extraction solvents
  • 17.4.5 - Processing aids
  • 17.5 - Food/dietary supplement definition according to the EU
  • 17.6 - Enriched/fortified foods definition according to the EU
  • 17.7 - Dietetic foods/foods for particular nutritional use (PARNUTS) definition according to the EU
  • 17.8 - Novel food definition according to the EU
  • 17.9 - Nutraceutical definition according to the EU
  • 17.10 - Genetically modified organisms (GMOs)
  • 17.11 - Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 18 - Health foods and foods with health claims in the Asian subcontinent: countries of the Association of Southeast Asia...
  • 18.1 - Introduction
  • 18.2 - Indonesia
  • 18.2.1 - Functional foods and regulatory framework
  • 18.2.2 - Health claims and nutrition labeling
  • 18.3 - Malaysia
  • 18.3.1 - Functional foods and regulatory framework
  • 18.3.2 - Health claims and nutrition labeling
  • 18.4 - Philippines
  • 18.4.1 - Functional foods and health claims
  • 18.4.2 - Nutrition labeling
  • 18.5 - Singapore
  • 18.5.1 - Health foods and regulatory framework
  • 18.5.2 - Health claims and nutritional labeling
  • 18.6 - Thailand
  • 18.6.1 - Functional foods and regulatory framework
  • 18.6.2 - Nutrition claims and nutrition labeling
  • 18.7 - Brunei Darussalam
  • 18.7.1 - Alternative medicine and regulatory framework
  • 18.7.2 - Health supplements as functional foods
  • 18.7.3 - Nutrition claims and nutrition labeling
  • 18.8 - Cambodia
  • 18.8.1 - Functional foods and natural health products
  • 18.8.2 - Regulations of traditional medicine
  • 18.8.3 - Regulatory framework and adoption of food standards
  • 18.8.4 - Labeling and health claims
  • 18.9 - Vietnam
  • 18.9.1 - Herbal health products
  • 18.9.2 - Functional foods and regulatory framework
  • 18.9.3 - Health claims and nutritional labeling
  • 18.10 - Laos
  • 18.10.1 - Food and health regulatory framework
  • 18.10.2 - Health claims and nutrition labeling
  • 18.11 - Myanmar
  • 18.11.1 - Food and health regulatory framework
  • 18.11.2 - Food claims and nutritional labeling
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter 19 - Nutraceutical innovation and health claims in China
  • 19.1 - Introduction
  • 19.2 - History and evolution of Chinese health (functional) foods
  • 19.3 - The use of allowed ingredients in approved health foods
  • 19.4 - Recent notable ingredient innovation and applications in health foods
  • References
  • Chapter 20 - Functional foods in line with young consumers: challenges in the marketplace in Slovenia
  • 20.1 - Introduction
  • 20.2 - Functional foods concept and definition
  • 20.3 - Functional food: European perspectives
  • 20.4 - The consumer self-care phenomenon
  • 20.5 - The future of functional foods
  • 20.6 - Markers: a key to development of functional foods
  • 20.7 - Research material and methods
  • 20.7.1 - Method and sample
  • 20.7.2 - Questionnaire
  • 20.7.3 - Data analyses
  • 20.8 - Results and discussion
  • 20.8.1 - Level of recognition of the term "functional foods"
  • 20.8.2 - Consumers' functional foods buying behavior
  • 20.8.3 - Perception of functional foods
  • 20.8.4 - Price willingness and future buying intentions
  • 20.9 - Future trends for functional foods market
  • 20.10 - Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 21 - Medical foods and US regulations
  • 21.1 - What exactly is a "medical food"?a
  • 21.2 - A brief history of medical food regulation
  • 21.3 - "Medical foods" versus other food categories regulated by FDA
  • 21.4 - Considerations for bringing a medical food to market in the United States
  • 21.4.1 - Premarket and administrative requirements
  • 21.4.2 - Formulation considerations
  • 21.4.3 - Labeling requirements
  • 21.4.4 - Compliance with FDA's Good Manufacturing Practices and other manufacturing restrictions
  • 21.4.5 - Claim substantiation requirements
  • 21.4.6 - FDA enforcement
  • 21.5 - CONCLUSIONS
  • Chapter 22 - Regulatory approvals, intellectual property, branding and trademark in nutraceuticals and functional foods
  • 22.1 - Introduction
  • 22.2 - Nutraceuticals, patent rights, and bioprospecting
  • 22.3 - Branding, and a hypothetical case scenario
  • 22.3.1 - Now that we have patent protection, we can market our natural creations with the confidence that they are complete...
  • 22.3.2 - Protecting your patents with coded identities and branding . the right way
  • 22.4 - Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 23 - Nutritional supplements in wound care
  • 23.1 - Introduction
  • 23.2 - Nutrition status and malnutrition in wound healing
  • 23.3 - Phases of wound healing
  • 23.4 - Fatty acids and inflammation
  • 23.5 - Dietary intervention and inflammation
  • 23.6 - Nutraceuticals and functional foods
  • 23.7 - Fermented papaya preparation
  • References
  • Chapter 24 - Development of low cost and eco-friendly feed for various candidate species for the sustainability of commercial aq...
  • 24.1 - Introduction
  • 24.2 - Phytic acid: the chelator of nutrients
  • 24.3 - Phytic acid: tough to ingest and digest
  • 24.4 - Phytase: a novel nutraceutical to digest phytate
  • 24.5 - Significance of phytase in aquafeed
  • 24.5.1 - Impact on phosphorus bioavailability
  • 24.5.2 - Impact on the bioavailability of other minerals
  • 24.5.3 - Impact on protein digestibility
  • 24.5.4 - Impact on growth performance
  • 24.5.5 - Impact on formulation of low-cost feed
  • 24.5.6 - Impact on aquaculture pollution
  • 24.6 - Synergism between the nutraceutical phytase and acidifiers
  • 24.7 - Drawbacks of using exogenous phytase in feed
  • 24.8 - Need of the hour
  • 24.9 - Flavor of fish fed a vegetarian diet
  • 24.10 - Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 25 - Strategies on adverse event reporting: a global framework for nutraceutical industry
  • 25.1 - Introduction
  • 25.2 - Nutraceutical industry backlash for perceived lack of regulatory oversight
  • 25.3 - Regulatory overview for nutraceuticals
  • 25.4 - US codification for marketing nutraceuticals
  • 25.5 - Global codification for nutraceuticals
  • 25.6 - Global postmarket safety surveillance requirements for nutraceuticals
  • 25.7 - Overview of good manufacturing practice requirements, specifications, and standardizations
  • 25.8 - Where quality meets pharmacovigilance
  • 25.9 - Ways to use postmarket data: safety reviews
  • 25.10 - Scrutiny of current good manufacturing practice for nutraceuticals
  • 25.11 - Where should our next best efforts in product safety be directed: premarket, postmarket, or both?
  • 25.12 - Social media: tweets, blogs, posts, oh my!
  • 25.13 - Postmarket data collection and review: what to do with adverse event data once you have it
  • 25.14 - Incidence trending
  • 25.15 - Signal detection
  • 25.16 - Relevant adaptations for nutraceuticals
  • 25.17 - Determining causality: causality assessment criteria
  • 25.18 - Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 26 - Genetically modified products and GMO foods: a game of chance?
  • 26.1 - Introduction
  • 26.2 - The benefits and costs to the farmer
  • 26.3 - The benefits and costs to the environment
  • 26.4 - The benefits and costs to the consumer
  • 26.5 - Public concerns and the regulatory environment
  • 26.6 - GM animals
  • 26.7 - Conclusions
  • References
  • Index
  • Back cover

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Tablet/Smartphone (Android; iOS): Installieren Sie bereits vor dem Download die kostenlose App Adobe Digital Editions (siehe E-Book Hilfe).

E-Book-Reader: Bookeen, Kobo, Pocketbook, Sony, Tolino u.v.a.m. (nicht Kindle)

Das Dateiformat EPUB ist sehr gut für Romane und Sachbücher geeignet - also für "fließenden" Text ohne komplexes Layout. Bei E-Readern oder Smartphones passt sich der Zeilen- und Seitenumbruch automatisch den kleinen Displays an. Mit Adobe-DRM wird hier ein "harter" Kopierschutz verwendet. Wenn die notwendigen Voraussetzungen nicht vorliegen, können Sie das E-Book leider nicht öffnen. Daher müssen Sie bereits vor dem Download Ihre Lese-Hardware vorbereiten.

Weitere Informationen finden Sie in unserer E-Book Hilfe.


Dateiformat: PDF
Kopierschutz: Adobe-DRM (Digital Rights Management)

Systemvoraussetzungen:

Computer (Windows; MacOS X; Linux): Installieren Sie bereits vor dem Download die kostenlose Software Adobe Digital Editions (siehe E-Book Hilfe).

Tablet/Smartphone (Android; iOS): Installieren Sie bereits vor dem Download die kostenlose App Adobe Digital Editions (siehe E-Book Hilfe).

E-Book-Reader: Bookeen, Kobo, Pocketbook, Sony, Tolino u.v.a.m. (nicht Kindle)

Das Dateiformat PDF zeigt auf jeder Hardware eine Buchseite stets identisch an. Daher ist eine PDF auch für ein komplexes Layout geeignet, wie es bei Lehr- und Fachbüchern verwendet wird (Bilder, Tabellen, Spalten, Fußnoten). Bei kleinen Displays von E-Readern oder Smartphones sind PDF leider eher nervig, weil zu viel Scrollen notwendig ist. Mit Adobe-DRM wird hier ein "harter" Kopierschutz verwendet. Wenn die notwendigen Voraussetzungen nicht vorliegen, können Sie das E-Book leider nicht öffnen. Daher müssen Sie bereits vor dem Download Ihre Lese-Hardware vorbereiten.

Weitere Informationen finden Sie in unserer E-Book Hilfe.


Download (sofort verfügbar)

128,52 €
inkl. 19% MwSt.
Download / Einzel-Lizenz
ePUB mit Adobe DRM
siehe Systemvoraussetzungen
PDF mit Adobe DRM
siehe Systemvoraussetzungen
Hinweis: Die Auswahl des von Ihnen gewünschten Dateiformats und des Kopierschutzes erfolgt erst im System des E-Book Anbieters
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