Green and Sustainable Advanced Materials

Applications, Volume 2
 
 
Standards Information Network (Verlag)
  • 1. Auflage
  • |
  • erschienen am 8. Oktober 2018
  • |
  • 402 Seiten
 
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe-DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-1-119-52848-7 (ISBN)
 
Sustainable development is a very prevalent concept of modern society. This concept has appeared as a critical force in combining a special focus on development and growth by maintaining a balance of using human resources and the ecosystem in which we are living. The development of new and advanced materials is one of the powerful examples in establishing this concept. Green and sustainable advanced materials are the newly synthesized material or existing modified material having superior and special properties. These fulfil today's growing demand for equipment, machines and devices with better quality for an extensive range of applications in various sectors such as paper, biomedical, textile, and much more. Volume 2, provides chapters on the valorization of green and sustainable advanced materials from a biomedical perspective as well as the applications in textile technology, optoelectronics, energy materials systems, and the food and agriculture industry.
1. Auflage
  • Englisch
  • Newark
  • |
  • USA
John Wiley & Sons Inc
  • Für Beruf und Forschung
  • 6,48 MB
978-1-119-52848-7 (9781119528487)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
Shakeel Ahmed is a Research Fellow at Bio+Polymers Research Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi. He obtained his PhD in the area of biopolymers and bionanocomposites. He has published several research publications in the area of green nanomaterials and biopolymers for various applications including biomedical, packaging, sensors, and water treatment. He is an associate member of the Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC), UK and life member of the Asian Polymer Association and Society of Materials Chemistry.

Chaudhery Mustansar Hussain, is an Adjunct Professor, an Academic Advisor and Director of Laboratories in the Department of Chemistry & Environmental Sciences at the New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT), Newark, New Jersey, USA. Dr. Hussain is the author of numerous papers in peer-reviewed journals as well as a prolific author and editor of several scientific monographs and handbooks in his research areas.
  • Cover
  • Title Page
  • Copyright Page
  • Contents
  • Preface
  • 1 Green Sustainability, Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials - A Critical Overview and a Vision for the Future
  • 1.1 Introduction
  • 1.2 The Aim and Objective of This Study
  • 1.3 The Need and the Rationale of This Study
  • 1.4 Environmental and Green Sustainability
  • 1.5 The Scientific Doctrine of Green Sustainability and Green Engineering
  • 1.6 Scientific Vision and Scientific Doctrine of Nanotechnology
  • 1.7 What Do You Mean by Advanced Materials?
  • 1.8 The World of Advanced Materials Today
  • 1.9 Recent Scientific Endeavour in the Field of Green Sustainability
  • 1.10 The Challenges and Vision of Research Pursuit in Nanotechnology Today
  • 1.11 Technological Vision and the Scientific Endeavour in Advanced Materials
  • 1.12 The Vision of Energy and Environmental Sustainability
  • 1.13 Global Water Shortage and the Challenges of Research and Development Initiatives
  • 1.14 Heavy Metal and Arsenic Groundwater Remediation
  • 1.15 Water Purification Technologies and the World of Environmental Sustainability
  • 1.16 Future Frontiers and Future Flow of Scientific Thoughts
  • 1.17 Future Research Trends in Sustainability and Nanotechnology Applications
  • 1.18 Summary, Conclusion and Scientific Perspectives
  • References
  • 2 Valorization of Green and Sustainable Advanced Materials from a Biomed Perspective - Potential Applications
  • 2.1 Introduction
  • 2.2 Multi-Functional Characteristics of Green and Sustainable Materials - Smart Polymers
  • 2.3 Biomedical Potentialities of Biopolymers and/or Biopolymers-Based Constructs
  • 2.4 Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles - Biomedical Applications
  • 2.5 BioMOFs: Metal-Organic Frameworks
  • 2.6 Bioinspired MOFs - Biomedical Application and Prospects
  • 2.7 Drug Delivery Perspectives of MOFs
  • 2.8 MOF in Enantioseparation of Drug Racemates
  • 2.9 Porous Covalent Organic Cages as Bio-Inspired Materials
  • 2.10 pH-Responsive Hydrogels for Drug Delivery Applications
  • 2.11 Concluding Remarks
  • Conflict of Interest
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • 3 Applications of Textile Materials Using Emerging Sources and Technology: A New Perspective
  • 3.1 Introduction
  • 3.2 Synthesis, Forms, Properties and Applications of Graphene
  • 3.2.1 Structure and Forms of Graphene
  • 3.2.2 Synthesis and Production Methods of Graphene
  • 3.2.3 Properties of Graphene
  • 3.2.4 Applications of Graphene
  • 3.2.4.1 Application of Graphene in Energy Storage, Optoelectronics, and Photovoltaic Cell
  • 3.2.4.2 Application of Graphene in Ultrafiltration and Bioengineering
  • 3.2.4.3 Application of Graphene in Textile Materials and Composites
  • 3.3 Essential Role for Nanomaterials in Textiles
  • 3.3.1 Developing and Processing Nanoengineered Textiles
  • 3.3.2 Nanofiber Application Driven by Function-of-Form Paradigm
  • 3.4 Types, Synthesis and Application of Dendrimers
  • 3.4.1 Types of Dendrimers
  • 3.4.2 Synthesis of Dendrimers (Divergent and Convergent Method)
  • 3.4.3 Application of Dendrimers in Chemical Processing of Textile Materials
  • 3.4.4 Application of Dendrimers in Medical Textiles
  • 3.4.5 Application of Dendrimers in Effluent Treatment
  • 3.5 Application of Plasma Technology in Textile Materials
  • 3.6 Synthesis and Applications of Biopolymer-Based Absorbents
  • 3.7 Conclusion
  • References
  • 4 Nanotechnology and Nanomaterials: Applications and Environmental Issues
  • 4.1 Introduction
  • 4.2 NPs and Nanodevices
  • 4.3 Types of NPs
  • 4.3.1 Carbon Based NPs
  • 4.3.1.1 Fullerenes
  • 4.3.1.2 Carbon Nanotubes
  • 4.3.1.3 Graphene Nanofoils
  • 4.3.1.4 Carbon Nanofibres
  • 4.3.1.5 Carbon Black
  • 4.3.1.6 Carbon Nanofoams
  • 4.3.2 Inorganic NPs
  • 4.3.2.1 Metals
  • 4.3.2.2 Metal Oxides
  • 4.3.2.3 Quantum Dots
  • 4.3.3 Organic NPs
  • 4.3.3.1 Organic Polymers
  • 4.3.3.2 Biologically Inspired NPs
  • 4.4 Applications of NPs
  • 4.4.1 Applications of Nanotechnology by Sectors of Activity
  • 4.4.2 Nanotechnology Applications by NP Type
  • 4.5 Environmental Impacts of Nanotechnology and its Products
  • 4.5.1 Potential Environmental Effects
  • 4.5.2 Fate of NPs in the Environment
  • 4.5.3 Positive Effects on Environment
  • 4.5.4 Negative Effects on Environment
  • 4.6 Conclusion
  • Acknowledgements
  • Conflict of Interests
  • References
  • 5 Chitosan in Water Purification Technology
  • 5.1 Introduction
  • 5.2 Chitosan
  • 5.3 Chitosan in Waste Water Treatment
  • 5.3.1 Treatment of Agricultural Waste Water
  • 5.3.2 Treatment of Textile Effluents
  • 5.3.3 Household Drinking Water Treatment
  • 5.4 Mechanism Behind the Waste Water Treatment by Chitosan
  • 5.4.1 Removal of Heavy Metals
  • 5.4.2 Removal of Bacteria
  • 5.5 Conclusion
  • References
  • 6 Green and Sustainable Advanced Materials - Environmental Applications
  • 6.1 Introduction
  • 6.2 Application of Advanced Green Sustainable Materials in Sensing and Removal of Water Toxicants
  • 6.2.1 Materials Used for Sensing and Removal of Dyes and Heavy Metals from Water
  • 6.2.1.1 Dyes
  • 6.2.1.2 Heavy Metal
  • 6.2.1.3 Removal of Heavy Metal and Dye from Naturally Derived Bio-Sorbents
  • 6.2.2 Removal of Microbial Pathogen from Water
  • 6.2.3 Removal of Radioactive Pollutants from Water
  • 6.3 Removal of Contaminants from Air
  • 6.4 Application of Sustainable Material in Soil Remediation
  • Acknowledgement
  • References
  • 7 Green and Sustainable Copper-Based Nanomaterials - An Environmental Perspective
  • 7.1 Introduction
  • 7.2 Copper-Based Nanomaterials and its Sustainability
  • 7.2.1 Metallic Copper Nanoparticles (Cu-NPs)
  • 7.2.2 Copper Oxide (CuO)-Based NPs
  • 7.2.3 Supported Copper Nanomaterials
  • 7.2.4 Growth Mechanism of Copper Nanomaterials
  • 7.3 Copper-Based Nanomaterials in Catalysis: As a Tool for Environmental Cleaning
  • 7.4 Copper-Based Nanomaterials in Environmental Remediation
  • 7.5 Environmental Perspective of Copper Nanomaterials
  • 7.6 Concluding Remarks
  • References
  • 8 An Excellence Method on Starch-Based Materials: A Promising Stage for Environmental Application
  • 8.1 History
  • 8.2 Sources
  • 8.2.1 Tubers or Roots
  • 8.2.2 Corn
  • 8.3 Physiochemical Properties
  • 8.3.1 Characteristics of Starch Granules
  • 8.3.2 Glass Transition Temperature and Birefringence
  • 8.3.3 Solubility and Swelling Capacity
  • 8.3.4 Retrogradation and Gelatinization
  • 8.3.5 Thermal and Rheological Properties
  • 8.4 Starch Gelatinization Measurement
  • 8.5 Processing of Starch
  • 8.5.1 Surface Hydrolysis
  • 8.5.2 Native Digestion
  • 8.5.3 Hydrothermal Modification
  • 8.6 Thermoplastic Starch
  • 8.7 Resistant Starch
  • 8.8 Starch Nanocrystals
  • 8.9 Ionic Liquid
  • 8.10 Enzyme Selection
  • 8.11 Packing Configuration
  • 8.12 Chemical Modification
  • 8.12.1 Cross-Linking
  • 8.12.2 Starch-Graft Copolymer
  • 8.12.2.1 Graft with Vinyl Monomers
  • 8.12.2.2 Graft with other Monomers
  • 8.12.3 Esterification
  • 8.12.3.1 Inorganic Starch Esters
  • 8.12.3.2 Organic Starch Esters
  • 8.12.4 Etherification
  • 8.12.5 Dual Modification
  • 8.12.6 Other Chemical Modification
  • 8.12.6.1 Oxidation
  • 8.12.6.2 Acid Modification
  • 8.13 Starch-Based Materials
  • 8.13.1 PLA Starch
  • 8.13.2 Starch Alginate
  • 8.13.3 PCL Starch
  • 8.13.4 Chitosan Starch
  • 8.13.5 Starch Clay
  • 8.13.6 Starch and DMAEMA
  • 8.13.7 Plasticized Starch(PLS)/Poly(Butylene Succinate Co-Butylene Adipate (PBSA)
  • 8.13.8 Gelatin-OSA Starch
  • 8.13.9 Chitin and Starch
  • 8.13.10 Cashew Nut Shell (CNS) and Chitosan
  • 8.14 Applications
  • 8.14.1 Wound Dressing
  • 8.14.2 Biomedical
  • 8.14.3 Nanomaterial
  • 8.14.4 Cancer
  • 8.14.5 Starch Film
  • 8.14.6 Gene Delivery
  • 8.14.7 Transdermal Delivery
  • 8.14.8 Resistive Switch Memory
  • 8.14.9 Oral Drug Delivery
  • 8.14.10 Waste Water Treatment
  • 8.14.11 Heavy Metal Removal
  • 8.14.12 Dry Removal
  • Acknowledgement
  • References
  • 9 Synthesized Cu2Zn1-xCdxSnS4 Quinternary Alloys Nanostructures for Optoelectronic Applications
  • 9.1 Introduction
  • 9.2 Experimental Process
  • 9.3 Results and Discussion
  • 9.4 Conclusions
  • References
  • 10 Biochar Supercapacitors: Recent Developments in the Materials and Methods
  • 10.1 Introduction
  • 10.1.1 Physicochemical Characteristics of Biochar
  • 10.1.2 Traditional Uses of Biochar
  • 10.1.2.1 Combustible Fuel
  • 10.1.2.2 Soil Amendment
  • 10.1.2.3 Carbon Sequestration
  • 10.1.3 Biochar in Sustainable Bioeconomy
  • 10.1.4 Value Added Utilization of Biochar
  • 10.1.4.1 Catalysis
  • 10.1.4.2 Polymer Composites
  • 10.1.4.3 Environmental Remediation
  • 10.1.4.4 Energy Storage and Conversion
  • 10.2 Biochar Supercapacitors
  • 10.2.1 Biochar Based Supercapacitor
  • 10.2.1.1 Agricultural Residues
  • 10.2.1.2 Industrial Crops
  • 10.2.1.3 Industrial Co- Products and By-Products
  • 10.2.1.4 Wood Biomasses
  • 10.2.2 Capacitive Mechanism for Biochar
  • 10.3 Biochar Modification Techniques for Capacitive Applications
  • 10.3.1 Activation
  • 10.3.1.1 Physical Techniques
  • 10.3.1.2 Chemical Techniques
  • 10.3.2 Metal, Metal Oxide and Metal Hydroxide Loading
  • 10.3.3 Nitrogen and Sulphur Doping
  • 10.4 Biochar Based Composite Materials for Supercapacitors Application
  • 10.5 Conclusions
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • 11 Nature and Technoenergy
  • 11.1 Introduction
  • 11.2 Concept of Sustainability
  • 11.3 Materials Science and Energy
  • 11.4 Green and Advanced Materials
  • 11.5 Emerging Natural and Nature-Inspired Materials
  • 11.6 Substrates and Encapsulates for Biodegradable and Biocompatible Electronics
  • 11.7 Semi-Natural/Semi-Synthetic Substrates: Paper
  • 11.8 Applications of Advanced Materials for Energy Applications
  • 11.8.1 Optical Materials for Energy Applications
  • 11.8.2 Lithium Ion Batteries
  • 11.8.3 Polymer Solar Cells
  • 11.8.4 Nanomaterials for Energy Application
  • 11.8.5 Electrochemical Capacitor
  • 11.8.6 Polymer Sulfur Composite Cathode Material
  • 11.9 Conclusion
  • References
  • 12 Biomedical Applications of Synthetic and Natural Biodegradable Polymers
  • 12.1 Introduction
  • 12.2 Desired Properties of Polymers for Biomedical Applications
  • 12.2.1 Super Hydrophobicity
  • 12.2.2 Adhesion
  • 12.2.3 Self-Healing
  • 12.3 Natural Polymers
  • 12.3.1 Collagen as a Biopolymer
  • 12.3.2 Applications of Collagen
  • 12.3.2.1 Collagen in Ophthalmology
  • 12.3.2.2 Collagen in Wound and Burn Dressing
  • 12.3.2.3 Collagen in Tissue Engineering
  • 12.3.3 Chitin and Chitosan as Biopolymers
  • 12.3.4 Applications of Chitin and Chitosan
  • 12.3.4.1 Chitosan in Ophthalmology
  • 12.3.4.2 Chitin- and Chitosan-Based Dressings
  • 12.3.4.3 Chitosan in Drug-Delivery Systems
  • 12.4 Synthetic Polymers
  • 12.4.1 Polyolefins
  • 12.4.2 Poly (Tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE)
  • 12.4.3 Poly (Vinyl Chloride) (PVC)
  • 12.4.4 Silicone
  • 12.4.5 Methacrylates
  • 12.4.6 Polyesters
  • 12.4.7 Polyethers
  • 12.4.8 Polyamides
  • 12.4.9 Polyurethanes
  • 12.5 Conclusion
  • Acknowledgements
  • Conflicts of Interests
  • References
  • 13 Efficiency of Transition Metals at Nanoscale - as Heterogeneous Catalysts
  • 13.1 Introduction
  • 13.2 Mechanism of Heterogeneous Catalyst
  • 13.3 Kinetics of Heterogeneous Catalyst
  • 13.4 Transition Metals
  • 13.4.1 Common Properties of Transition Metals
  • 13.5 Individual Properties of Different Transition Metals
  • 13.5.1 Scandium (Sc)
  • 13.5.2 Titanium (Ti)
  • 13.5.3 Vanadium (V)
  • 13.5.4 Chromium (Cr)
  • 13.5.5 Manganese (Mn)
  • 13.5.6 Iron (Fe)
  • 13.5.7 Cobalt (Co)
  • 13.5.8 Nickel (Ni)
  • 13.5.9 Copper (Cu)
  • 13.5.10 Zinc (Zn)
  • 13.5.11 Yttrium (Y)
  • 13.5.12 Zirconium (Zr)
  • 13.5.13 Niobium (Nb)
  • 13.5.14 Molybdenum (Mo)
  • 13.5.15 Technetium (Tc)
  • 13.5.16 Rhodium (Rh)
  • 13.5.17 Palladium (Pd)
  • 13.5.18 Silver (Ag)
  • 13.5.19 Cadmium (Cd)
  • 13.5.20 Lanthanum (La)
  • 13.5.21 Hafnium (Hf)
  • 13.5.22 Tantalum (Ta)
  • 13.5.23 Tungsten (W)
  • 13.5.24 Rhenium (Re)
  • 13.5.25 Osmium (Os)
  • 13.5.26 Iridium (Ir)
  • 13.5.27 Platinum (Pt)
  • 13.5.28 Gold (Au)
  • 13.5.29 Mercury (Hg)
  • 13.5.30 Actinium (Ac)
  • 13.5.31 Rutherfordium (Rf)
  • 13.5.32 Dubnium (Db)
  • 13.5.33 Seaborgium (Sg)
  • 13.5.34 Bohrium (Bh)
  • 13.5.35 Hassium (Hs)
  • 13.5.36 Meitnerium (Mt)
  • 13.5.37 Roentgenium (Rg)
  • 13.5.38 Copernicium (Cn)
  • 13.6 Ability of Transitional Metals for Good Catalysts
  • 13.7 Advantages of Catalyst at Nanoscale
  • 13.8 Conclusion
  • References
  • 14 Applications of Nanomaterials in Agriculture and Food Industry
  • 14.1 Introduction
  • 14.2 Nanotechnology and Agriculture
  • 14.2.1 Precision Farming and Nanotechnology
  • 14.2.2 Control Release Formulations
  • 14.2.3 Nanoagrochemicals
  • 14.2.4 Nanopesticides
  • 14.2.5 Nanofungicides
  • 14.2.6 Nanofertilizers
  • 14.3 Nanotechnology in the Food Industry
  • 14.3.1 Food Packaging
  • 14.3.2 Biodegradable Packaging
  • 14.3.3 Antimicrobial Packaging
  • 14.3.4 Antimicrobial Sachets
  • 14.3.5 Nanocomposites and Bioactive Compounds
  • 14.3.6 Nanosensors
  • 14.3.7 Detection of Microorganisms
  • 14.3.8 Smart Packaging
  • 14.4 Toxicity Concerns Involved with Nanotechnology
  • References
  • Index
  • EULA

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