Urban Mobility and the Smartphone

Transportation, Travel Behavior and Public Policy
 
 
Elsevier (Verlag)
  • 1. Auflage
  • |
  • erschienen am 16. November 2018
  • |
  • 222 Seiten
 
E-Book | ePUB mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-0-12-812648-6 (ISBN)
 

Urban Transportation and Mobile ICT: Mobility, Travel Behavior, and Public Policy analyzes the impacts of the massive diffusion of mobile information and communication technologies (ICT) on individual transportation behaviors, while also examining the transportation industry and urban planning public policy. The book provides the definitions of emerging concepts, such as connected mobility, connected places, and shared modes, while also presenting a systematic and rigorous analysis of the changes triggered by the diffusion of mobile ICTs. In addition, it examines the implications for transportation and land-use planning research and policymaking.

Users will find this work a benchmark on which changes in a mobility system can be assessed and anticipated.

  • Synthesizes existing research into one reference, providing researchers and public policymakers with a clear and complete understanding of the underlying drivers of change
  • Analyzes numerous case studies throughout Europe, North America and China - as well as key African, South-American and South-East Asian cities
  • Provides insights for researchers and practitioners looking to engage in 'smart cities" and 'smart mobility" discourse


Anne Aguilera is Deputy-Director and Senior Researcher at the French Institute of Science and Technology for Transport, Development and Network. Her work focuses on the relationship between information and communication technologies, lifestyles, and travel behavior. She has more than 50 published papers and book chapters in mobility behavior and patterns, and her work has been published in Elsevier's Journal of Transport Geography and Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice.
  • Englisch
  • San Diego
  • |
  • USA
  • 7,78 MB
978-0-12-812648-6 (9780128126486)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
  • Front Cover
  • URBAN MOBILITY AND THE SMARTPHONE
  • URBAN MOBILITY AND THE SMARTPHONE
  • Copyright
  • CONTENTS
  • CONTRIBUTORS
  • ABOUT THE AUTHORS
  • CONTEXT (PREFACE)
  • OUR APPROACH TO THE ISSUES AT HAND
  • WHO MIGHT FIND THIS BOOK HELPFUL?
  • CHAPTER CONTENT
  • REFERENCES
  • ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
  • 1 - Smartphone and Individual Travel Behavior
  • INTRODUCTION
  • 1. USES OF TIME AND ACTIVITY SCHEDULES
  • 1.1 No Fall in Physical Displacements
  • 1.2 Complex Interactions Between ICT and Mobility
  • 1.3 What Are the Specific Impacts of Mobile ICT?
  • 1.3.1 Microcoordination and ``Flexible Alignment''
  • 1.3.2 The Role of Mobility Support Apps
  • 1.3.3 New Travel and ``Optimized'' Travel
  • 1.3.4 The Limits of Schedule Flexibility
  • 2. ON THE MOVE ACTIVITIES, TRANSPORT TIME, AND QUALITY OF SERVICE OF TRANSPORT MODES
  • 2.1 Exploiting Transport Time
  • 2.2 Quality of Service and Perception of Transport Modes
  • 2.3 A Limited Impact on Travel Behavior?
  • 3. NEW MOBILITY SERVICES
  • 3.1 Typology of Shared Mobility Services and Potential Impact on Mobility
  • 3.2 Smartphone and Shared Mobility
  • 3.3 Adoption of the New Services and Influence on Mobility Practices
  • 3.3.1 Short-Distance Mobility Sharing
  • 3.3.2 Long-Distance Ridesharing
  • CONCLUSION
  • REFERENCES
  • 2 - New Mobility Services
  • INTRODUCTION
  • 1. CHANGES IN THE URBAN MOBILITY SERVICES LANDSCAPE
  • 1.1 New (or Renewed Forms of) Mobility Services: An Accelerating Trend of Diversification
  • 1.2 New Players With Strong Momentum
  • 2. DECODING THE CHANGES IN URBAN MOBILITY SERVICES: WHAT IS REALLY BEHIND THE ``SHARED MOBILITY'' CONCEPT?
  • 2.1 The ``Sharing Economy'' as It Stands, in Theory
  • 2.1.1 The Price of Success
  • 2.1.2 From the ``Sharing Economy'' to ``Shared Mobility''
  • 2.2 Mapping New Mobility Services Along Three Core Dimensions of the Sharing Economy
  • 2.2.1 The Community-Based Economy: A Fertile Ground for Service Innovations?
  • 2.2.2 The Access-Based Economy: A Tricky Transition From Ownership to ``Usership'' and From Products to Product-Service Systems
  • 2.2.3 The Platform Economy: The Real Tipping Factor
  • 2.3 What do Smartphones and Applications Really Do for Shared Mobility?
  • 2.3.1 The Power of Right-Here-Right-Now
  • 2.3.2 The Ease of All-In-One
  • 2.3.3 The Safety of Total Tracking
  • 3. WHERE IS THE COMPETITION GOING?
  • 3.1 Spoiler Alert: Predicting the Future Is Difficult
  • 3.2 Acknowledging Current Concerns About the Competition Between Old and New .
  • 3.2.1 Ride-sourcing Versus Taxis: the Combat Hogging the Spotlight
  • 3.2.2 Ride-Sourcing Versus Public Transit: A War Brewing?
  • 3.3 . and Looking Beyond
  • 3.3.1 Convergences in the Business Models
  • 3.3.2 Convergences in the Operational Models of the More Flexible Mobility Services
  • 4. LOOKING FURTHER DOWN THE ROAD . WHAT QUESTIONS REMAIN FOR THE FUTURE?
  • 4.1 Outstanding Issues
  • 4.2 Is the Fight for Data Really the Endgame?
  • REFERENCES
  • 3 - Using Mobile Phone Data to Observe and Understand Mobility Behavior, Territories, and Transport Usage
  • INTRODUCTION
  • 1. WHAT ARE MOBILE PHONE DATA?
  • 1.1 Diversity of Datasets Generated by Mobile Phones
  • 1.2 Smartphones as Multisensing Tools to Measure Location, Motion, and Local Environment
  • 2. MAKING MOBILE PHONE DATA FIT FOR MOBILITY ANALYSIS
  • 2.1 Situating Mobile Phone Data-Based Analytics in the Mobility Monitoring Toolbox
  • 2.2 Six Steps from Mobile Phone Use to the Use of Mobile Phone Data
  • 2.3 The Inference of Stays, Travel Modes, Activities, and Individual Characteristics
  • 2.3.1 Clustering Points to Recognize Stays and Anchor Points
  • 2.3.2 Travel Mode Inference at Leg and Trip Level
  • 2.3.3 Inference of Activities and Trip Purposes
  • 2.3.4 Inference of Social Characteristics at Individual Level
  • 3. APPLICATIONS OF MOBILE PHONE DATA TO TRAVEL BEHAVIOR ANALYSIS
  • 3.1 Patterns of Travel Behavior
  • 3.1.1 Identifying Individual Patterns Over Time
  • 3.1.2 Determinants of Collective Patterns
  • 3.2 Medium and Long-term Evolution of Individual Behavior
  • 3.3 Mobility of Nonresidents
  • 4. APPLICATIONS OF MOBILE PHONE DATA TO TERRITORIAL ANALYSIS
  • 4.1 Presence in Space and Time
  • 4.2 Detection of Geographical Objects: Hotspots, City Limits, and City Networks
  • 4.3 Qualifying Areas Through Frequentation
  • 4.4 Mobility Within Buildings or Stations
  • 5. APPLICATIONS OF MOBILE PHONE DATA TO THE TRANSPORT SYSTEM
  • 5.1 The Traffic Characterization of Transport Elements: Stations, Legs, and Quality of Service
  • 5.2 Characterisation of OD Demand
  • 5.3 Transit System Management
  • 5.3.1 Real-Time Information Service
  • 5.3.2 Transit Operation, Monitoring, and Management
  • 5.3.3 Network Management
  • 5.3.3 Parking Management
  • 5.4 On Path-Making Along Modal and Multimodal Networks
  • 5.4.1 Path Flows
  • 5.4.2 Path Choices and Decision-Making Behaviors
  • 6. CHALLENGES ASSOCIATED WITH THE USE OF MOBILE PHONE DATA
  • 6.1 Inference Techniques and Their Limits
  • 6.2 The Challenge of Finding Validation Data and Estimating Representativeness
  • 6.2.1 Validation of Inferences
  • 6.2.2 Validation of Synthesized Information
  • 6.2.3 Representativeness
  • 6.3 Challenges for Participant Recruitment and Social Acceptability
  • 6.3.1 Participant Recruitment
  • 6.3.2 Social Acceptability
  • 7. POTENTIAL INFLUENCE OF MOBILE PHONE DATA ON MOBILITY STAKEHOLDERS
  • 7.1 Mobile Phone Data-Based Analytics: New Paradigms in the Field of Mobility Studies?
  • 7.2 Mobile Phone Data-Based Analytics: A Revolution for Managing and Living Mobility?
  • 7.2.1 Stakeholders' Interests
  • 7.2.2 Empowered Mobility Systems
  • CONCLUSION
  • ANNEXE
  • REFERENCES
  • 4 - Implications for Public Policy
  • INTRODUCTION
  • 1. NEW PERSPECTIVES FOR TRANSPORT NETWORK MANAGEMENT AND TRANSPORT PLANNING
  • 1.1 Transport Network Management
  • 1.2 Transport Planning
  • 2. PUBLIC CHALLENGES ASSOCIATED WITH THE EMERGENCE OF NEW TRANSPORT MODES AND MOBILITY SERVICES
  • 2.1 A New Frame of Reference for Sustainable Transport Policies
  • 2.2 Public Action in Response to the New Mobility Services
  • 2.2.1 Open Data in the Transport Field
  • 2.2.2 The Car, Public Transport, and Shared Transport Services
  • 3. THE NEW CHALLENGES OF INTEGRATED MOBILITY PLATFORMS AND MOBILITY-AS-A SERVICE
  • 3.1 The Gradual Digital Integration of Mobility Services by Private Actors
  • 3.2 The Challenges to Public Authorities of Digitally Integrated Mobility Service and the Maas Concept
  • 3.2.1 Challenges and Opportunities
  • 3.2.2 The Maas Concept
  • 3.2.3 Implementation of MaaS
  • CONCLUSION
  • REFERENCES
  • 5 - Impacts and Challenges for Developing Countries
  • INTRODUCTION
  • 1. RECENT TRENDS IN SMARTPHONE OWNERSHIP AND TRAVEL BEHAVIOR IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES
  • 1.1 Smartphone Ownership and Internet Access
  • 1.2 Travel Behavior
  • 2. NEW (SMARTPHONE-ENABLED) MOBILITY SERVICES
  • 2.1 The International Ride-hailing Revolution Reaches the Cities of Developing Countries
  • 2.2 Developing Countries Are Breeding Ride-hailing Champions
  • 2.2.1 Actors from Large Emerging Economies Have Mostly Remained Focused on Their Domestic Market
  • 2.2.2 Some Other Actors From Developing Countries Have Opted for Regional Development Strategies
  • 2.2.3 Additional Actors Competing for the Ride-Hailing Market of Cities in Developing Countries
  • 2.3 Developing Countries Are Pioneers in the Diversification of Ride-hailing Formats and Options
  • 2.4 Developing Countries Were Also Pioneers in Free-Floating Bikesharing
  • 3. CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES OF SMARTPHONES FOR URBAN MOBILITY POLICY-MAKING IN DEVELOPING ECONOMIES
  • 3.1 Exacerbated Challenges
  • 3.2 Amplified Opportunities
  • 3.2.1 Building Up Knowledge and Expertise Relating to the Mobility System
  • 3.2.2 Improving the Level of Service Provided by Public Transit and Paratransit Services
  • 4. TAKING A STEP BACK . AND EXAMINING OUTSTANDING ISSUES
  • 4.1 Global Trends Versus Local Adaptations
  • 4.2 Will Smartphones Help Make Urban Mobility in Developing Countries Smart?
  • 4.3 Will Smartphones Help Make Urban Mobility in Developing Countries Sustainable?
  • REFERENCES
  • INDEX
  • A
  • B
  • C
  • D
  • E
  • F
  • G
  • H
  • I
  • L
  • M
  • N
  • O
  • P
  • Q
  • R
  • S
  • T
  • U
  • V
  • Back Cover

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