Banking and Capital Markets 2020

 
 
College of Law Publishing
  • erschienen am 19. Januar 2020
  • |
  • 310 Seiten
 
E-Book | ePUB mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-1-913226-36-7 (ISBN)
 
Banking and Capital Markets is a practical guide to a field that has seen a rapid rate of change in recent years.
2020
  • Englisch
  • Guildford
  • |
  • Großbritannien
The College of Law
  • Für Beruf und Forschung
  • Überarbeitete Ausgabe
  • 4,34 MB
978-1-913226-36-7 (9781913226367)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
  • Cover
  • Title Page
  • Copyright Page
  • Preface
  • Contents
  • Table of Cases
  • Table of Statutes
  • Table of Secondary Legislation, Accounting Standards and Rules
  • Table of Abbreviations
  • Chapter 1: Raising Finance: An Overview of Players and Products
  • 1.1. Introduction
  • 1.2. Borrowers
  • 1.3. Lenders
  • 1.4. A bank is a bank is a bank
  • 1.5. The finance solicitor's role
  • 1.6. Perspectives
  • Part I: Facility Agreements
  • Chapter 2: Due Diligence, Commitment Letters and the Term Sheet
  • 2.1. Introduction: understanding the context
  • 2.2. Due diligence
  • 2.3. The term sheet and commitment letter
  • 2.4. What should the commitment letter cover?
  • 2.5. What should a basic term sheet cover?
  • 2.6. Legal effect of the term sheet
  • 2.7. Private equity term sheets
  • 2.8. From commitment documents to loan: duty to negotiate in good faith?
  • 2.9. Sample term sheet
  • 2.10. Confidentiality letter
  • Chapter 3: Plain Vanilla or Bells and Whistles?
  • 3.1. Introduction
  • 3.2. Common types of facility
  • 3.3. Syndicated facilities
  • 3.4. Leveraged acquisition facilities
  • 3.5. Other forms of short-term lending
  • 3.6. Which facility is appropriate?
  • 3.7. Anatomy of a facility agreement
  • 3.8. Matched Funding
  • 3.9. Further reading
  • Chapter 4: When, Who, Where, What and Why?
  • 4.1. Introduction
  • 4.2. Date
  • 4.3. Parties
  • 4.4. Interpretation/definitions
  • 4.5. The facility
  • 4.6. Purpose clause
  • 4.7. Conditions precedent
  • 4.8. Availability
  • 4.9. Floating rate interest
  • 4.10. Fixed rate interest
  • 4.11. Interest periods
  • 4.12. Apportionment: the 'day count fraction'
  • 4.13. Ratchets
  • 4.14. Hedging
  • 4.15. Default interest
  • 4.16. Basis points
  • Summary
  • Chapter 5: Representations
  • 5.1. Introduction
  • 5.2. Representations in a facility agreement
  • 5.3. Representations - the bank's perspective
  • 5.4. Representations - the borrower's perspective
  • 5.5. Representations in contract law
  • 5.6. Conclusion
  • Chapter 6: A Review of Company Accounts
  • 6.1. Introduction
  • 6.2. Financial statements
  • 6.3. The balance sheet
  • 6.4. Income statement
  • 6.5. Directors' report, auditor's report, and notes to the accounts
  • 6.6. Cash flow statements
  • 6.7. Consolidated accounts
  • 6.8. Management accounts
  • 6.9. Accounting regulations
  • Summary
  • Chapter 7: Undertakings
  • 7.1. Introduction
  • 7.2. What is an undertaking?
  • 7.3. Financial covenants
  • 7.4. Information undertakings
  • 7.5. General undertakings
  • 7.6. Undertakings - The Bank's Perspective
  • 7.7. Undertakings - The Borrower's Perspective
  • Chapter 8: Events of Default
  • 8.1. Introduction
  • 8.2. Why have events of default?
  • 8.3. Common events of default
  • 8.4. Events of default and other clauses
  • 8.5. Action on default
  • 8.6. Grace periods, defaults and potential events of default
  • 8.7. Events of default - the bank's perspective
  • 8.8. Events of default - the borrower's perspective
  • Chapter 9: Boiler Plate, Mechanics and Miscellaneous Clauses
  • 9.1. Introduction
  • 9.2. Repayment, prepayment and cancellation
  • 9.3. Margin protection
  • 9.4. Costs and expenses
  • 9.5. Fees
  • 9.6. Remedies, waivers, partial invalidity and amendments
  • 9.7. Force majeure
  • 9.8. Governing law and jurisdiction
  • 9.9. Miscellaneous
  • 9.10. Schedules
  • 9.11. Execution
  • 9.12. US and English law loan facilities
  • Chapter 10: Novation, Assignment and Sub-Participation
  • 10.1. Introduction
  • 10.2. Why sell a loan?
  • 10.3. Moving rights and obligations
  • 10.4. Selling assets
  • 10.5. Global Transfer Agreement
  • 10.6. Distressed and par loans
  • 10.7. Tax implications
  • 10.8. Financial Services and Markets Act implications
  • 10.9. Borrower transfers
  • 10.10. Other jurisdictions
  • 10.11. Securitisation
  • 10.12. Asset sales - the bank's perspective
  • 10.13. Asset sales - the borrower's perspective
  • 10.14. Further reading
  • Chapter 11: Drafting Tips
  • 11.1. Introduction
  • 11.2. Creating the document
  • 11.3. The aims of drafting
  • 11.4. Templates and precedents
  • 11.5. Drafting techniques
  • 11.6. Key words
  • 11.7. Time computations
  • Part II: Secured Lending
  • Chapter 12: Common Forms of Security
  • 12.1. Introduction
  • 12.2. Categorising security
  • 12.3. Giving rights over assets
  • 12.4. Transfer of ownership
  • 12.5. Giving physical possession
  • 12.6. Assignment
  • 12.7. Some terminology
  • 12.8. Further reading
  • Chapter 13: Quasi-Security
  • 13.1. Introduction
  • 13.2. Third party support - guarantees and comfort letters
  • 13.3. Negative pledge
  • 13.4. Retention of title
  • 13.5. Set-off
  • 13.6. Why take security?
  • 13.7. Security - the bank's perspective
  • 13.8. Security - the borrower's perspective
  • 13.9. Further reading
  • Chapter 14: Further Issues On Taking Security
  • 14.1. Introduction
  • 14.2. Perfection through registration
  • 14.3. Priority of security
  • 14.4. Contractual subordination
  • 14.5. Tacking
  • 14.6. Ruling off accounts
  • 14.7. Fixed or floating charge?
  • 14.8. Hardening periods
  • 14.9. Capacity
  • 14.10. Corporate benefit
  • 14.11. Financial assistance
  • 14.12. Applicable law
  • 14.13. Uncitral Model Law
  • 14.14. Other considerations on taking security
  • 14.15. Further reading
  • Chapter 15: Security Documentation - Debentures
  • 15.1. Introduction
  • 15.2. Structure of a typical debenture
  • 15.3. Execution
  • Chapter 16: Legal Opinions
  • 16.1. Introduction
  • 16.2. What are legal opinions?
  • 16.3. Preamble
  • 16.4. Assumptions
  • 16.5. Opinion
  • 16.6. Qualifications
  • 16.7. Foreign counsel legal opinions
  • 16.8. Conclusion
  • Part III: Capital Markets
  • Chapter 17: Introduction To International Capital Markets
  • 17.1. Introduction
  • 17.2. What is a capital market?
  • 17.3. Domestic and euromarkets
  • 17.4. Debt and equity securities
  • 17.5. Bonds and notes
  • 17.6. Other debt securities
  • 17.7. Primary and secondary markets
  • 17.8. Clearing systems
  • 17.9. International Capital Markets Association
  • 17.10. The issuers
  • 17.11. Credit rating
  • 17.12. Further reading
  • Chapter 18: The Forms and Legal Characteristics of a Bond
  • 18.1. Introduction
  • 18.2. The form of a bond
  • 18.3. Legal nature of a bond
  • 18.4. Comparing registered and bearer bonds
  • 18.5. The legal effect on bearer bonds held in clearing systems
  • 18.6. Further reading
  • Chapter 19: Issuing a Bond - The Parties and Documentation
  • 19.1. Introduction
  • 19.2. Parties to a bond issue
  • 19.3. Documentation of a bond issue
  • 19.4. Terms and conditions of a bond
  • Chapter 20: Bond Prospectus and Listing Particulars
  • 20.1. Introduction
  • 20.2. Obtaining a London listing
  • 20.3. When is an approved prospectus required?
  • 20.4. Contents of a prospectus
  • 20.5. General duty of disclosure
  • 20.6. Prospectus Directive regime and 'grandfathering'
  • 20.7. Omission of information
  • 20.8. Liability for prospectus and listing particulars
  • 20.9. The 'Golden Belt' case
  • 20.10. Other jurisdictions
  • Chapter 21: Issuing a Bond - The Process
  • 21.1. Introduction
  • 21.2. The stages of a bond issue
  • 21.3. Mandate
  • 21.4. Due diligence
  • 21.5. Documentation
  • 21.6. Marketing
  • 21.7. Launch and syndication
  • 21.8. Listing
  • 21.9. Signing
  • 21.10. Closing
  • Glossary
  • Bibliography
  • Index

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