Map Librarianship

A Guide to Geoliteracy, Map and GIS Resources and Services
 
 
Chandos Publishing
  • 1. Auflage
  • |
  • erschienen am 4. November 2016
  • |
  • 294 Seiten
 
E-Book | ePUB mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
E-Book | ePUB mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-0-08-100045-8 (ISBN)
 

Map Librarianship identifies basic geoliteracy concepts and enhances reference and instruction skills by providing details on finding, downloading, delivering, and assessing maps, remotely sensed imagery, and other geospatial resources and services, primarily from trusted government sources. By offering descriptions of traditional maps, geographic information systems (GIS), remote sensing, and other geospatial technologies, the book provides a timely and practical guide for the map and geospatial librarian to blend confidence in traditional library skill sets.


  • Includes rarely discussed concepts of citing and referencing maps and geospatial data, fair use and copyright
  • Creates an awareness and appreciation of existing print map collections, while building digital stewardship with surrogate map and aerial imagery collections
  • Provides an introduction to the theory and applications of GIS, remote sensing, participatory neogeography and neocartography practices, and other geospatial technologies
  • Includes a list of geospatial resources with descriptions and illustrations of commonly used map types and formats, online geospatial data sources, and an introduction to the most commonly used geospatial software packages available, on both desktop and mobile platforms


Dr. Susan W. Aber is the Director of the Science and Math Education Center and Peterson Planetarium at Emporia State University (ESU), Emporia, Kansas USA. She is a geologist, graduate gemologist, map librarian, and university teacher. She taught in the Earth Science Department at ESU and was Federal Depository Map Librarian. She has taught LIS courses via distance education at San José State University and North Carolina Central University. Her LIS dissertation focused on the information needs and information-seeking behaviors of geoscience educators in the academic community. Her research interests are in information use and user studies, amber fossil resin, as well as the scientific visualization of information using kite aerial photography.
  • Englisch
  • OXford
Elsevier Science
  • 182,91 MB
978-0-08-100045-8 (9780081000458)
0081000456 (0081000456)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
  • Front Cover
  • Map Librarianship: A Guide to Geoliteracy, Map and GIS Resources and Services
  • Copyright
  • Dedication
  • Preface
  • Why Map Librarianship and Geoliteracy?
  • Why Maps?
  • Why Libraries and Librarians?
  • Why This Book and These Co-authors?
  • Acknowledgments
  • Chapter 1: Introduction to Maps and Librarians
  • 1.1 Maps: Our Spatial Compass
  • 1.2 What is Geography?
  • 1.3 Historic Progression of Maps and Cartographers
  • 1.4 What Are NeoGeography and NeoCartography?
  • 1.5 Historic Progression of Map Librarianship
  • 1.6 What Is NeoMap Librarianship?
  • References
  • Chapter 2: Spatial Thinking and Geo-Literacy
  • 2.1 Geo-Literacy: Location-Based Spatial Thinking
  • 2.2 What Is a Map?
  • 2.3 Reference and Thematic Maps
  • 2.4 Mapping Data-Map Symbology Techniques
  • 2.5 The Choropleth Map
  • 2.6 The Dot Density Map
  • 2.7 The Proportional Symbol Map
  • 2.8 The Cartogram
  • 2.9 Mapping Terrain
  • 2.10 Mapping Data-Map Types
  • 2.11 Aeronautical Charts
  • 2.12 Atlas and Gazetteers
  • 2.13 Bird's-Eye View
  • 2.14 Coal, Oil, and Natural Gas Investigation Maps
  • 2.15 Geologic and Mining
  • 2.16 Historic
  • 2.17 National Parks
  • 2.18 Nautical Charts
  • 2.19 Physiographic
  • 2.20 Planimetric
  • 2.21 Political
  • 2.22 Soil
  • 2.23 Topographic
  • 2.24 Globes and Raised-Relief Models
  • 2.25 Aerial Photography
  • 2.26 Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 3: Basic Map Concepts-The Science of Cartography
  • 3.1 Scale and Resolution
  • 3.2 Geodesy
  • 3.3 Projections
  • 3.4 North Defined
  • 3.5 Legends
  • 3.6 Grids and Graticules
  • 3.7 Latitude and Longitude
  • 3.8 Universal Transverse Mercator Coordinate System
  • 3.9 State Plane Coordinate System
  • 3.10 Public Land Survey System
  • 3.11 Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 4: Geographic Information Systems and Remote Sensing
  • 4.1 What is a Geographic Information System?
  • 4.2 Layering the Data
  • 4.3 What is Remote Sensing?
  • 4.4 The Difference Between Vector and Raster Data
  • 4.5 Sources of Raster Data
  • 4.6 Web GIS as a Component of NeoGeography
  • 4.7 Volunteered Geographic Information
  • 4.8 The Role of GPS in VGI
  • 4.9 Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 5: Terrain Mapping Meets Digital Data
  • 5.1 Digitally Representing Terrain
  • 5.2 Digital Raster Graphics
  • 5.3 Digital Line Graphs
  • 5.4 Digital Elevation Models
  • 5.5 Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 6: Map and Geospatial Librarianship
  • 6.1 Introduction
  • 6.2 Academic Preparation and Continuing Education
  • 6.3 History and Transitions in Map and Geospatial Librarianship
  • 6.4 GeoWeb and Geospatial Librarianship
  • 6.5 Historical Beginnings-ALA and MAGIRT
  • 6.6 Core Competencies: ALA and MAGIRT
  • 6.7 History of Academic Curriculum to Support Map Librarianship
  • 6.8 Transitions in Academic Curriculum to Support Map Librarianship
  • 6.9 Job Opportunities and Challenges in Map and Geospatial Librarianship
  • Job Title: Geospatial Information Systems Specialist
  • Job Title: Curator of Maps and Prints
  • Job Title: Senior Library Specialist-Cartographic Resources Coordinator
  • Job Title: Summer Internship Opportunity: GIS company library
  • Job Title: Geospatial Consultant
  • 6.10 Map Library Work Space and Equipment
  • 6.11 Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 7: Geospatial Resources and Instruction Services
  • 7.1 Introduction
  • 7.2 Navigating the Labyrinth-Legal Considerations
  • 7.2.1 Copyright
  • 7.2.2 Copyright Law
  • 7.2.3 Creative Commons
  • 7.2.4 Fair Use and Public Domain
  • 7.3 Navigating the Labyrinth-Where to Go to Get What?
  • 7.4 Guide Through GIS and Remote Sensing Software
  • 7.4.1 Google Earth
  • 7.4.2 ArcGIS
  • 7.4.3 MapInfo
  • 7.4.4 Free and Open-Source GIS: QGIS, GRASS GIS, and Others
  • 7.4.5 ERDAS IMAGINE
  • 7.4.6 ENVI
  • 7.4.7 TerrSet
  • 7.4.8 Mobile GIS
  • 7.5 Guide to Finding Maps, Data, and Other Geospatial Resources
  • 7.5.1 U.S. Census Bureau and Censusreporter.org
  • 7.5.2 Center for International Earth Science Information Network (CIESIN)
  • 7.5.3 Central Intelligence Agency World Factbook
  • 7.5.4 European Environment Agency
  • 7.5.5 European Union INSPIRE
  • 7.5.6 Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth
  • 7.5.7 Gazetteers
  • 7.5.8 Geospatial Multistate Archive and Preservation Partnership (GeoMAPP)
  • 7.5.9 Global Visualization Viewer (GloVis) and EarthExplorer
  • 7.5.10 Hazards Data Distribution System (HDDS)
  • 7.5.11 The Library of Congress
  • 7.5.12 The National Atlas
  • 7.5.13 National Geologic Map Database
  • 7.5.14 National Geospatial Digital Archives (NGDA)
  • 7.5.15 The National Map
  • 7.5.16 Natural Resources Canada's GeoGratis
  • 7.5.17 Soviet Topographic Maps
  • 7.5.18 USDA Geospatial Gateway and Web Soil Survey
  • 7.6 Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 8: Reference Desk
  • 8.1 Introduction
  • 8.2 Location Matters
  • 8.3 Reference Librarian Duties
  • 8.3.1 The Basics
  • 8.3.2 Reference Core Competencies
  • 8.4 Types of Questions
  • 8.4.1 Reference Guides
  • 8.5 Support Groups for Map Librarianship
  • 8.5.1 Geography and Maps, Social Sciences Division of SLA
  • 8.5.2 Geoscience Information Society
  • 8.5.3 Western Association of Map Librarians
  • 8.5.4 Association of Canadian Map Libraries and Archives
  • 8.5.5 Map and Geospatial Information Round Table
  • 8.5.6 North American Cartographic Information Society
  • 8.5.7 International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions
  • 8.5.8 Cartographic Users Advisory Council
  • 8.5.9 Northeast Map Organization
  • 8.5.10 Journals and Social Media
  • 8.6 Citing and Referencing Maps and Geospatial Data
  • 8.6.1 Plagiarism Defined
  • 8.6.2 Library Copyright Policy
  • 8.6.3 Map and Geospatial Resource Citation
  • CMS
  • CSE
  • MLA
  • APA
  • 8.6.4 APA Cartographic Citations
  • Complete Atlas
  • An Individual Map in an Atlas
  • Bird's Eye-View
  • A Map in a Series
  • A Map in a Book
  • A Map or Aerial Photograph in a Periodical or Academic Journal Article
  • Relief Model
  • A Static Map on the Web
  • A Dynamically Generated Map or Geospatial Data
  • Aerial Photograph
  • Satellite Data
  • Profile Section or Geologic Cross section
  • GIS data
  • 8.7 Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 9: Collection Development
  • 9.1 Introduction
  • 9.2 Knowing Users and Use of Map and GIS Resources
  • 9.2.1 A Quantitative Approach to Determine Library Users and Usage
  • 9.2.2 A Qualitative Approach to Determine Users and Uses of Maps and GIS
  • 9.2.3 Collection Development Budgets
  • 9.2.4 Collection Development Gifts and Digital Philanthropy
  • 9.3 Collection Development Policy
  • 9.4 CDP Examples
  • 9.4.1 Dartmouth College Library
  • 9.4.2 The Library of Congress
  • 9.4.3 University of Chicago
  • 9.4.4 Louisiana State University
  • 9.4.5 The University of California Santa Barbara
  • 9.5 Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 10: Cataloging and Classifying
  • 10.1 Introduction
  • 10.2 A Brief History of Cataloging Maps
  • 10.3 A Brief History of Classifying Maps
  • 10.4 Classification Systems and Maps
  • 10.4.1 Boggs and Lewis and American Geographical Society Classification Systems
  • 10.4.2 Dewey Decimal Classification
  • 10.4.3 Universal Decimal Classification
  • 10.4.4 Federal Depository Superintendent of Documents Classification
  • 10.4.5 The U.S. Library of Congress Classification, Schedule G
  • 10.5 Cataloging Cartographic Resources
  • 10.5.1 Progress in Cataloging
  • 10.5.2 Tools of Cataloging
  • 10.5.3 Change is Inevitable
  • 10.6 Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 11: Promotion and Summary of Map and GIS Resources and Services
  • 11.1 Information Challenges
  • 11.2 Promotion of Library Resources
  • 11.3 Geography Awareness Week, GIS Day, and Earth Science Week
  • 11.4 Geocaching and GPS Activities
  • 11.5 Conclusion
  • 11.6 In Summary of Map Librarianship
  • References
  • Appendix A
  • University of Illinois Library School 1951
  • LS 306 Readings: Introduction to Maps and Map Libraries
  • Map Nomenclature
  • History of Maps
  • Map Libraries
  • LS 306 Readings: Cartobibliographic Aids
  • Works Treating Maps
  • Cartobibliographies Proper
  • Catalogs of Individual Collections
  • Catalogs of Governmental Mapping Agencies
  • Catalogs of Commercial Mapping Agencies
  • Catalogs of Societal Mapping Agencies
  • Periodicals
  • Atlases
  • Selected Atlases
  • Gazetteers and Miscellaneous Aids
  • Selected Gazetteers and Aids
  • LS 306 Readings: Physical Care, Classifying, Cataloging, and Rare Maps
  • Physical Care and Treatment of Maps
  • Classification of Maps
  • Cataloging of Maps
  • Old and Rare Maps
  • Reference
  • Appendix B
  • References
  • Appendix C
  • References
  • Index
  • Back Cover

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