Becoming and Being a Play Therapist

Play Therapy in Practice
 
 
Routledge (Verlag)
  • erschienen am 8. Februar 2019
  • |
  • 324 Seiten
 
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-1-351-35976-4 (ISBN)
 

Becoming and Being a Play Therapist: Play Therapy in Practice presents a rich and illuminating account of current play therapy practice, with an emphasis on becoming and being a play therapist and on some of the varied clinical contexts in which play therapists work. Written by members of British Association of Play Therapists, this book highlights the current complexity of play therapy practice in the UK and reflects the expertise of the collected authors in working with emotional, behavioural and mental health challenges in children and young people.

Divided into three parts, the book is designed to build on and consolidate the principles and professional/personal competences of play therapy practice. Key topics include:

    • Training and establishing oneself as a play therapist in the UK, a comprehensive guide.

    • The improvisational practitioner; therapist responses to resistance and aggressive play.

    • Systemic considerations in play therapy with birth families and adopters; advantages and challenges.

    • Case-study based explorations of play therapy across a range of service user groups, including childhood trauma, bereavement and sexual abuse, and agency contexts, including school and CAMHS settings.

    Becoming and Being a Play Therapist will be relevant both for play therapy trainees and for qualified play therapists as well as for related professionals.

    • Englisch
    • Milton
    • |
    • Großbritannien
    Taylor & Francis Ltd
    • Für höhere Schule und Studium
    7 schwarz-weiße Abbildungen, 3 schwarz-weiße Tabellen
    • 6,25 MB
    978-1-351-35976-4 (9781351359764)
    weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt

    Peter Ayling is a qualified play therapist and social worker who has specialised in working with children and young people within the care system for 25 years. He worked for 14 years within a Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service (CAMHS) for Looked After Children. Pete currently works as a Senior Lecturer in Social Work and maintains a small, private play therapy practice.

    Harriet Armstrong obtained a Master's Degree in Play Therapy from the University of Roehampton in 2009. She has since worked as a play therapist privately and in schools with children who have suffered a wide range of trauma, disorders and difficulties. Harriet has been Chair of PR and Communications of BAPT and is currently Joint Vice-Chair.

    Lisa Gordon Clark trained as a play therapist at Roehampton, following several years as a primary school teacher, and has since worked both in private practice and as resident play therapist at a Child and Family Centre in London. Lisa is currently Programme Convener of the Play Therapy MA at the University of Roehampton and Fellow of the HEA.

    • Cover
    • Half Title
    • Title Page
    • Copyright Page
    • Dedication
    • Table of Contents
    • List of figures
    • List of contributors
    • Abbreviations
    • Foreword
    • Introduction
    • Note on confidentiality
    • Note
    • References
    • PART I: Becoming a play therapist
    • 1. Training issues: before, during and after
    • Chapter overview
    • What makes asuitable candidate for training as aplay therapist?
    • What the training entails and what to expect
    • What happens once qualified?
    • Summary
    • To find out more about the Master's programmes currently accredited by BAPT
    • References
    • 2. The play therapist's personal therapy
    • Overview
    • Untangling the knots
    • What is BAPT's rationale for personal therapy?
    • What are the requirements?
    • Choosing atherapist
    • Modality of the personal therapist
    • Recording personal therapy during training
    • Links with core competences and self-care
    • How open are play therapists about their personal therapy?
    • How do we know the impact of play therapists' personal therapy?
    • Personal and professional life impacts
    • Should personal therapy be mandatory for all play therapy students?
    • Cross over and boundaries between personal therapy and clinical supervision
    • Conclusion
    • Summary
    • Further reading
    • References
    • Websites
    • 3. The role of clinical supervision in play therapy practice
    • Chapter overview
    • What is clinical supervision?
    • Clinical supervision requirements
    • Definition
    • Theoretical models
    • The supervisor's own theoretical model
    • Creative approaches
    • Roles and responsibilities
    • The rewards of being asupervisor
    • Summary
    • Note
    • References/further reading
    • 4. The play therapy room: why it matters
    • Chapter overview
    • The impact of the physical setting: what do we know?
    • Spaces communicate
    • Spaces have purpose
    • The communicative and purposeful functions of play therapy
    • How the physical environment can support the therapeutic relationship
    • Privacy and the therapeutic relationship
    • How the physical environment can support the expression and containment of feelings
    • How the physical environment can support the promotion of self-efficacy and competence for the client
    • Further considerations and challenges
    • Conclusion
    • Summary
    • Further reading
    • References
    • 5. Setting up in independent practice as a play therapist
    • Chapter overview
    • Location of work
    • Getting established as aplay therapist
    • Legal and ethical matters
    • Financial matters
    • Play therapy kit
    • Maintaining CPD
    • Ongoing support and self-care
    • Summary
    • Useful websites
    • References
    • PART II: Being a play therapist
    • 6. Being an ethical play therapist
    • Chapter overview
    • Introduction
    • Ethical principles in play therapy
    • Personal qualities
    • Working with ethical dilemmas in play therapy
    • Case study: Simone
    • The legal framework and what you need to know
    • Maintaining ethical practice
    • Summary
    • Notes
    • Further reading
    • References
    • 7. Being a playful therapist
    • Chapter overview
    • Introduction
    • Play theory
    • What is play?
    • Children's views of play
    • Playfulness
    • Playful play therapy
    • The playful practitioner
    • Case study: aplayful encounter
    • Summary
    • Further reading
    • References
    • 8. Being an improvisational play therapist
    • Chapter overview
    • What improvisation has to offer
    • How improvisation can be applied to the play therapist
    • Summary
    • Further reading
    • References
    • 9. Containing feelings and setting limits in play therapy: working with aggression
    • Chapter overview
    • Play therapy and emotional regulation
    • Understanding and responding to aggressive play
    • Limit-setting in play therapy
    • Therapist's use of self
    • Summary
    • Further reading
    • References
    • 10. Time-limited play therapy
    • Chapter overview
    • Advantages of short-term play therapy
    • Contraindications
    • Special considerations
    • Working with families and systems
    • Use of working hypotheses
    • Summary
    • Note
    • Further reading
    • References
    • PART III: Play therapy in practice
    • 11. Play therapy within a CAMHS setting
    • Chapter overview
    • Who are we and what do we do?
    • Claudia: meetings at the Sweet Lemon café
    • So . who do we see and why?
    • Barefoot Hannah
    • Summary
    • Further reading
    • References
    • 12. Play therapy in schools
    • Chapter overview
    • Introduction
    • Preparing to deliver play therapy in school
    • Maintaining confidentiality within school
    • Safeguarding children within school
    • Expectations of play therapy
    • Dual roles within school
    • Managing the play space
    • Conclusions
    • Summary
    • Further reading
    • References
    • 13. Narrative group play therapy in a school setting
    • Chapter overview
    • Introduction
    • Research literature on groups
    • Assessment for group play therapy
    • Narrative play therapy
    • Story-making
    • Resources
    • Sessions
    • Group composition
    • Discussion of group process
    • Evaluation
    • Considerations for planning group play therapy
    • Summary
    • Further reading
    • References
    • 14. Play therapy with children affected by sexual abuse: developing awareness, safety and trust
    • Chapter overview
    • Considering the child's experiences
    • Developing asense of safety through preparation
    • Meeting the child
    • Using congruence
    • Defining sexual abuse
    • The impact of sexual abuse
    • Response by the parent/carer to the actual disclosure
    • Use of video-recording in clinical practice
    • Summary
    • Further reading
    • References
    • 15. Working with bereavement and loss in play therapy
    • Chapter overview
    • Introduction
    • Theories of loss
    • Working with the wider system
    • Therapist's use of self
    • Trusting the child's inner process
    • Working flexibly within child-centred practice
    • Evaluating outcomes in play therapy
    • Conclusion
    • Summary
    • Further reading
    • Note
    • References
    • 16. Integrative approaches to working with trauma
    • Chapter overview
    • Developmental trauma
    • Child centred play therapy
    • An integrative approach
    • Stepping Stones (child therapy consultants) integrated model
    • Parent/carer consultation sessions
    • Summary
    • Note
    • Further reading
    • References
    • 17. Play therapy and polyvagal theory: towards self-regulation for children with paediatric medical trauma
    • Chapter overview
    • Paediatric medical trauma and the Polyvagal Theory
    • Engaging traumatised children in play therapy
    • The vagal brake
    • Vitality matching
    • Asomatic trajectory
    • Chapter summary
    • Note
    • Further reading
    • References
    • 18. Working with child trauma through EMDR and play therapy
    • Chapter overview
    • EMDR
    • Trauma
    • Dissociation
    • EMDR intervention
    • Introducing play therapy as an intervention
    • Conclusion
    • Summary
    • Further Reading
    • References
    • 19. Relational approaches to play therapy: supporting adoptive and foster carers and their families
    • Chapter overview
    • Introduction
    • Engaging carers in the assessment process
    • Engaging carers in the intervention
    • My own learning
    • Committing to paper
    • When children are in one-to-one play therapy
    • Summary
    • Note
    • Further reading
    • References
    • 20. Working with parents and carers: Child Parent Relationship Therapy
    • Chapter overview
    • Introduction
    • Context of project
    • Referrals process
    • Play and emotional development
    • The toys and how they help
    • Video recording
    • Supporting aparent's sense of competence
    • Role-play and other approaches to skills learning
    • The learning experience
    • Ending the group process
    • Summary
    • Further reading
    • Useful video resources
    • References
    • Appendix 1: BAPT play therapy core competences
    • Appendix 2: BAPT's ethical basis for good practice in play therapy
    • Appendix 3: Sample contract
    • Index
    "This text highlights BAPT's gold level in professional standards and competencies, providing a clear rationale about why you should choose a BAPT trained play therapist or BAPT recognized training course in the UK. It serves as a comprehensive guide providing insight into the clinical contexts in which play therapists work and invaluable information, support, and resources to all who are, or wish to become, involved in the field."


    - Eileen Prendiville, Children's Therapy Centre, Ireland





    "This book is a very comprehensive overview of the training, theory and practice of play therapy in the UK. All the contributors are highly experienced UK play therapists who give us an in depth presentation of current practice which is informed by cross-disciplinary theory and contemporary research. This book is quite remarkable in its depth and its breadth. A must-read for not only play therapists and students but also other related clinicians in the arts and psychotherapies, teachers in all forms of education and parents too. I am passionate about the importance of play, and reading this book was joyous and stimulating."


    - Professor Sue Jennings, specialist in Neuro-Dramatic-Play
     

    "This text highlights BAPT's gold level in professional standards and competencies, providing a clear rationale about why you should choose a BAPT trained play therapist or BAPT recognized training course in the UK. It serves as a comprehensive guide providing insight into the clinical contexts in which play therapists work and invaluable information, support, and resources to all who are, or wish to become, involved in the field."


    - Eileen Prendiville, Children's Therapy Centre, Ireland



    "This book is a very comprehensive overview of the training, theory and practice of play therapy in the UK. All the contributors are highly experienced UK play therapists who give us an in depth presentation of current practice which is informed by cross-disciplinary theory and contemporary research. This book is quite remarkable in its depth and its breadth. A must-read for not only play therapists and students but also other related clinicians in the arts and psychotherapies, teachers in all forms of education and parents too. I am passionate about the importance of play, and reading this book was joyous and stimulating."


    - Professor Sue Jennings, specialist in Neuro-Dramatic-Play

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