North American Genocides

Indigenous Nations, Settler Colonialism, and International Law
 
 
Cambridge University Press
  • erschienen am 1. August 2019
 
  • Buch
  • |
  • Hardcover
  • |
  • 262 Seiten
978-1-108-42550-6 (ISBN)
 
The eliminatory dynamics of settler colonialism in North America included episodes of genocide of Indigenous peoples. This book offers a legal methodology that establishes this, as well as a critique that enhances our understanding of genocide in significant ways, especially with respect to the cultural dimensions of genocide.
  • Englisch
  • New York
  • |
  • USA
  • Für Beruf und Forschung
Worked examples or Exercises
  • Höhe: 159 mm
  • |
  • Breite: 236 mm
  • |
  • Dicke: 17 mm
  • 500 gr
978-1-108-42550-6 (9781108425506)
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Laurelyn Whitt is Professor of Native Studies at Brandon University, Manitoba, Canada. The author of Science, Colonialism, and Indigenous Peoples (Cambridge, 2009), and co-author with Alan W. Clarke of The Bitter Fruit of American Justice: International and Domestic Resistance to the Death Penalty (2007), she has published widely in issues at the intersection of Indigenous Studies, Science Studies and Legal Studies. Alan W. Clarke is Professor of Integrated Studies at Utah Valley University, and was a fellow of the Nathanson Centre for Transnational Human Rights, Crime and Security. He is co-author, with Laurelyn Whitt, of The Bitter Fruit of American Justice: International and Domestic Resistance to the Death Penalty (2007), and is the author of Rendition to Torture (2012).
Introduction; 1. North American genocide denial; 2. The legal case for historical genocides: a retrospective methodology; 3. Settler colonialism and Indigenous nations; 4. A legal primer for settler colonial genocides; 5. The Beothuk (1500-1830); 6. The Powhatan Tsenacommacah (1607-1677); 7. The conventional account of genocide: from a restrictive to an expansive interpretation; 8. Toward an account of systemic genocide; Appendix A. Secretariat's draft convention; Appendix B. Ad hoc Committee Draft Convention; Appendix C. United Nations Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of Genocide; Index.
'For too long, the historical experience and lasting impact of settler colonialism on the indigenous peoples of the Americas has been neglected in international law scholarship. This thoughtful and provocative work helps bring this reality to the surface, particularly in respect of the controversial use of the term 'genocide' to describe colonial policies of physical and cultural destruction.' Payam Akhavan, McGill University, Montreal and former UN prosecutor 'This indispensable, remarkable and necessary book will change the way one comprehends the meaning of the crime of genocide in United Nations law. It is a brilliant and groundbreaking exposition that illuminates the predicament of the contested understanding of the crime of genocide and challenges the refusal to apply it to the destruction of North American Indigenous nations.' Sakej Henderson, Native Law Centre of Canada 'In 1946, two years before the UN Genocide Convention was adopted, the General Assembly recognized that 'many instances' of the crime of genocide had already taken place. This thoughtful and compelling account makes the case for one of them, the intentional destruction of indigenous peoples in North America.' William A. Schabas, Middlesex University 'For too long, the historical experience and lasting impact of settler colonialism on the indigenous peoples of the Americas has been neglected in international law scholarship. This thoughtful and provocative work helps bring this reality to the surface, particularly in respect of the controversial use of the term 'genocide' to describe colonial policies of physical and cultural destruction.' Payam Akhavan, McGill University, Montreal and former UN prosecutor 'This indispensable, remarkable and necessary book will change the way one comprehends the meaning of the crime of genocide in United Nations law. It is a brilliant and groundbreaking exposition that illuminates the predicament of the contested understanding of the crime of genocide and challenges the refusal to apply it to the destruction of North American Indigenous nations.' Sakej Henderson, Native Law Centre of Canada 'In 1946, two years before the UN Genocide Convention was adopted, the General Assembly recognized that 'many instances' of the crime of genocide had already taken place. This thoughtful and compelling account makes the case for one of them, the intentional destruction of indigenous peoples in North America.' William A. Schabas, Middlesex University
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