From Puerto Rico to Philadelphia

Puerto Rican Workers and Postwar Economies
 
 
Temple University Press,U.S.
  • erscheint ca. am 9. Februar 2001
 
  • Buch
  • |
  • Hardcover
  • |
  • 309 Seiten
978-1-56639-835-0 (ISBN)
 
Whalen uncovers a vast amount of information on the history of Puerto Rican immigration to Philadelphia.
Carmen Teresa Whalen is Assistant Professor of Puerto Rican and Hispanic Caribbean Studies at Rutgers University.
Carmen Teresa Whalen is Assistant Professor of Puerto Rican and Hispanic Caribbean Studies at Rutgers University.
List of Maps, Figures, and Tables Acknowledgments 1. Looking for Work in the Global Economy: An Introduction 2. From the Country to the Cities: Internal Migration and Migration to the States 3. Contract Labor: The State-Sponsored Migration 4. Leaving Local Communities: San Lorenzo and Salinas 5. A Plethora of Limited Opportunities: Philadelphia's Economy 6. Formulating the "Culture of Poverty": Philadelphia's Response to Puerto Rican Migration 7. From Labor Migrants to the "Underclass": Interpreting Puerto Rican Poverty Epilogue Appendix I: Additional Data Appendix II: A Word on Sources Notes Selected Bibliography Index
"Whalen pushes us to consider whether this is the direction that women's history needs to go if it wants to treat racism and migration seriously: telling community stories rather than focusing on women per se, and showing, rather than assuming, that gender is an important piece of how racism and colonialism are lived."
-The Women's Review of Books "[R]epresents the best of several writings...in English on the social and cultural history of Puerto Ricans in the United States. Whalen's magnificent prose tells the story of several generations of Puerto Rican families from the municipalities of Salinas and San Lorenzo who have chosen the path of migration to Philadelphia. Her detailed descriptions and rich analyses are the result of research in firsthand archival records and documents on Puerto Rico's planned migration and show how that policy formed one of the many pillars of the country's economic development strategy early in the 1940s."
-The Journal of American History
 

<i>"[R]epresents the best of several writings...in English on the social and cultural history of Puerto Ricans in the United States. Whalen's magnificent prose tells the story of several generations of Puerto Rican families from the municipalities of Salinas and San Lorenzo who have chosen the path of migration to Philadelphia. Her detailed descriptions and rich analyses are the result of research in firsthand archival records and documents on Puerto Rico's planned migration and show how that policy formed one of the many pillars of the country's economic development strategy early in the 1940s."</i>
-<b><i>The Journal of American History</i></b>


<i>"Whalen pushes us to consider whether this is the direction that women's history needs to go if it wants to treat racism and migration seriously: telling community stories rather than focusing on women per se, and showing, rather than assuming, that gender is an important piece of how racism and colonialism are lived."</i>
-<b><i>The Women's Review of Books</i></b>


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