The Use of Force for State Power

History and Future
 
 
Palgrave Macmillan (Verlag)
  • 1. Auflage
  • |
  • erschienen am 23. Juni 2020
 
  • Buch
  • |
  • Hardcover
  • |
  • 336 Seiten
978-3-030-45409-8 (ISBN)
 
This book studies force, the coercive application of power against resistance, building from Thomas Hobbes' observation that all self-contained political orders have some ultimate authority that uses force to both dispense justice and to defend the polity against its enemies. This cross-disciplinary analysis finds that rulers concentrate force through cooperation, conveyance, and comprehension, applying common principles across history. Those ways aim to keep foes from concerting their actions, or by eliminating the trust that should bind them. In short, they make enemies afraid to cooperate, and now they are doing so in cyberspace as well.
1st ed. 2020
  • Englisch
  • Cham
  • |
  • Schweiz
Springer International Publishing
  • Für Beruf und Forschung
  • 2 s/w Abbildungen, 11 farbige Abbildungen
  • |
  • 11 Illustrations, color; 2 Illustrations, black and white; XX, 315 p. 13 illus., 11 illus. in color.
  • Höhe: 216 mm
  • |
  • Breite: 153 mm
  • |
  • Dicke: 23 mm
  • 548 gr
978-3-030-45409-8 (9783030454098)
10.1007/978-3-030-45410-4
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt

Michael Warner serves as an Historian in the U.S. Department of Defense and has written and lectured on intelligence and cyberspace history.

John Childress is a U.S. Army Lieutenant Colonel who has served as a ground commander in Iraq and Afghanistan and as an Assistant Professor at the United States Military Academy at West Point.

Chapter 1: Introduction: Tools for Sovereignty: Power and Force

Chapter 2: Divide and Conquer: The Progress of Force to 1800

Chapter 3: "The Civilizing Mission": European Dominance to 1914

Chapter 4: The World Crisis:1914-1953

Chapter 5: A Frozen World, 1953-1990

Chapter 6: A Liberal Order?

Chapter 7: Information Wars

Conclusion: Force and Trust in the Future
This book studies force, the coercive application of power against resistance, building from Thomas Hobbes' observation that all self-contained political orders have some ultimate authority that uses force to both dispense justice and to defend the polity against its enemies. This cross-disciplinary analysis finds that rulers concentrate force through cooperation, conveyance, and comprehension, applying common principles across history. Those ways aim to keep foes from concerting their actions, or by eliminating the trust that should bind them. In short, they make enemies afraid to cooperate, and now they are doing so in cyberspace as well.

Michael Warner serves as an Historian in the U.S. Department of Defense and has written and lectured on intelligence and cyberspace history.

John Childress is a U.S. Army Lieutenant Colonel who has served as a ground commander in Iraq and Afghanistan and as an Assistant Professor at the United States Military Academy at West Point.

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