Primaeval History Interpreted

The Rewriting of Genesis 1-11 in the Book of Jubilees
 
 
Brill (Verlag)
  • 1. Auflage
  • |
  • erschienen am 11. Oktober 2000
 
  • Buch
  • |
  • Hardcover
  • |
  • 410 Seiten
978-90-04-11658-0 (ISBN)
 
Academic, scholars (Theology; Jewish Studies), research libraries, those interested in the history of biblical interpretation, in post-Biblical literature, and in intertextuality.
  • Englisch
  • Leiden
  • |
  • Niederlande
  • Für Beruf und Forschung
  • mit Schutzumschlag
174 Taf.
  • Höhe: 246 mm
  • |
  • Breite: 169 mm
  • |
  • Dicke: 33 mm
  • 898 gr
978-90-04-11658-0 (9789004116580)
9004116583 (9004116583)
Jacques van Ruiten, Ph.D. (1990) in Theology, is Associated Professor of Old Testament and Early Jewish Literature at the Qumran Institute, Rijksuniversiteit Groningen. He has published on the history of biblical interpretation and intertextuality. He is one of the editors of Journal for the Study of Judaism.
'...une telle comparaison detaillee est indispensable pour bien comprendre l'originalite du livre des Jubiles.'
Andre Lemaire, Revue des Etudes juives, 2002.
This volume deals with the primaeval history in the Book of Jubilees, an interpretative rewriting of the biblical narratives of Genesis through Exodus 19, written in the second century BCE. It contains a close comparison of Genesis 1-11 and Jubilees 2-10, in order to get a clear picture of the specific way the biblical story was rewritten. Each chapter offers an overall comparison of the parallel pericopes in Genesis and Jubilees, with special attention to the structure of the passages. It then gives a synoptic overview of the text of the parallel passages, along with a classification (e.g., addition, omission, variation, rearrangement), and analysis of the dissimilarities. The work is important for those interested in the history of biblical interpretation, in post-biblical Jewish literature and in intertexuality.

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