Judicial Dictatorship

 
 
Transaction Publishers
  • 1. Auflage
  • |
  • erschienen am 30. Januar 1995
 
  • Buch
  • |
  • Softcover
  • |
  • 160 Seiten
978-1-56000-926-9 (ISBN)
 
American society has undergone a revolution within a revolution. Until the 1960s, America was a liberal country in the traditional sense of legislative and executive checks and balances. Since then, the Supreme Court has taken on the role of the protector of individual rights against the will of the majority by creating, in a series of decisions, new rights for criminal defendants, atheists, homosexuals, illegal aliens, and others. Repeatedly, on a variety of cases, the Court has overturned the actions of local police or state laws under which local officials are acting. The result, according to Quirk and Birdwell, is freedom for the lawless and oppression for the law abiding. 'Judicial Dictatorship' challenges the status quo, arguing that in many respects the Supreme Court has assumed authority far beyond the original intent of the Founding Fathers. In order to avoid abuse of power, the three branches of the American government were designed to operate under a system of checks and balances. However, this balance has been upset. The Supreme Court has become the ultimate arbiter in the legal system through exercise of the doctrine of judicial review, which allows the court to invalidate any state or federal law it considers inconsistent with the constitution. Supporters of judicial review believe that there has to be a final arbiter of constitutional interpretation, and the Judiciary is the most suitable choice. Opponents, Thomas Jefferson and Abraham Lincoln among them, believed that judicial review assumes the judicial branch is above the other branches, a result the Constitution did not intend. The democratic paradox is that the majority in America agreed to limit its own power. Jefferson believed that the will of the majority must always prevail. His faith in the common man led him to advocate a weak national government, one that derived its power from the people. Alexander Hamilton, often Jefferson's adversary, lacking such faith, feared "the amazing violence and turbulence of the democratic spirit." This led him to believe in a strong national government, a social and economic aristocracy, and finally, judicial review. This conflict has yet to be resolved. 'Judicial Dictatorship' discusses the issue of who will decide if government has gone beyond its proper powers. That issue, in turn, depends on whether the Jeffersonian or Hamiltonian view of the nature of the person prevails. In challenging customary ideological alignments of conservative and liberal doctrine, 'Judicial Dictatorship' will be of interest to students and professionals in law, political scientists, and those interested in U.S. history.
  • Englisch
  • Somerset
  • |
  • Großbritannien
Taylor & Francis Inc
  • Für höhere Schule und Studium
  • |
  • Für Beruf und Forschung
  • Höhe: 224 mm
  • |
  • Breite: 149 mm
  • |
  • Dicke: 10 mm
  • 227 gr
978-1-56000-926-9 (9781560009269)
1560009268 (1560009268)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
-Judicial Diactatorship is a radical book in the best sense: it compels readers to rethink their most basic assumptions about the court. . . . Quirk and Bridwell have, in sum, written an insightful and provocative book that every student of American constitutional law needs to study carefully.-

-- The Mises Review

-The federal government is unquestionably in lower repute than at any time since General Beauregard gave the order to open fire on Fort Sumner. Judicial Dictatorship explains why, and does it so thouroughly it will shame even confirmed enemies of federal power into thinking they have been too indulgent with Washington.-

--Thomas Jackson, American Renaissance

-The trick of using unelected courts to declare popularly enacted laws unconstitutional is not a new one, of course. In a new and learned book, Judicial Dictatorship, University of South Carolina law professors William J. Quirk and Randall Bridwell point out that the trick goes back to the founding itself.-

--Samuel Francis, Syndicated Columnist "Judicial Diactatorship is a radical book in the best sense: it compels readers to rethink their most basic assumptions about the court. . . . Quirk and Bridwell have, in sum, written an insightful and provocative book that every student of American constitutional law needs to study carefully."

-- The Mises Review

"The federal government is unquestionably in lower repute than at any time since General Beauregard gave the order to open fire on Fort Sumner. Judicial Dictatorship explains why, and does it so thouroughly it will shame even confirmed enemies of federal power into thinking they have been too indulgent with Washington."

--Thomas Jackson, American Renaissance

"The trick of using unelected courts to declare popularly enacted laws unconstitutional is not a new one, of course. In a new and learned book, Judicial Dictatorship, University of South Carolina law professors William J. Quirk and Randall Bridwell point out that the trick goes back to the founding itself."

--Samuel Francis, Syndicated Columnist "Judicial Diactatorship is a radical book in the best sense: it compels readers to rethink their most basic assumptions about the court. . . . Quirk and Bridwell have, in sum, written an insightful and provocative book that every student of American constitutional law needs to study carefully."

-- The Mises Review

"The federal government is unquestionably in lower repute than at any time since General Beauregard gave the order to open fire on Fort Sumner. Judicial Dictatorship explains why, and does it so thouroughly it will shame even confirmed enemies of federal power into thinking they have been too indulgent with Washington."

--Thomas Jackson, American Renaissance

"The trick of using unelected courts to declare popularly enacted laws unconstitutional is not a new one, of course. In a new and learned book, Judicial Dictatorship, University of South Carolina law professors William J. Quirk and Randall Bridwell point out that the trick goes back to the founding itself."

--Samuel Francis, Syndicated Columnist "The federal government is unquestionably in lower repute than at any time since General Beauregard gave the order to open fire on Fort Sumner. Judicial Dictatorship explains why, and does it so thouroughly it will shame even confirmed enemies of federal power into thinking they have been too indulgent with Washington."

--Thomas Jackson, American Renaissance

"The trick of using unelected courts to declare popularly enacted laws unconstitutional is not a new one, of course. In a new and learned book, Judicial Dictatorship, University of South Carolina law professors William J. Quirk and Randall Bridwell point out that the trick goes back to the founding itself."

--Samuel Francis, Syndicated Columnist "The trick of using unelected courts to declare popularly enacted laws unconstitutional is not a new one, of course. In a new and learned book, Judicial Dictatorship, " "University of South Carolina law professors William J. Quirk and Randall Bridwell point out that the trick goes back to the founding itself." "-Samuel Francis, "Syndicated Columnist"" "The trick of using unelected courts to declare popularly enacted laws unconstitutional is not a new one, of course. In a new and learned book, Judicial Dictatorship, " "University of South Carolina law professors William J. Quirk and Randall Bridwell point out that the trick goes back to the founding itself.""-Samuel Francis, "Syndicated Columnist""

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