Emerging Powers, Development Cooperation and South-South Relations

 
 
Palgrave Macmillan (Verlag)
  • erscheint ca. am 25. Dezember 2020
 
  • Buch
  • |
  • Hardcover
  • |
  • IX, 222 Seiten
978-3-030-51536-2 (ISBN)
 

This book analyses the role of emerging powers as a development assistance providers and the nature of their development cooperation, their behaviour, motives and markedly their changing identities in international relations. With their growing economic and political clout, emerging powers are using economic instruments like foreign aid to ensure their position in the international system that is going through power shifts. By comparing three major emerging economies of the Global South- Brazil, India and China- this book would explore how emerging powers are changing the international aid architecture that is created and dominated by the traditional donors.
1st ed. 2021
  • Englisch
  • Cham
  • |
  • Schweiz
Springer International Publishing
  • Für Beruf und Forschung
  • 8
  • |
  • 10 farbige Tabellen, 1 s/w Abbildung, 8 farbige Abbildungen
  • |
  • 10 Tables, color; 8 Illustrations, color; 1 Illustrations, black and white; IX, 222 p. 9 illus., 8 illus. in color.
  • Höhe: 21 cm
  • |
  • Breite: 14.8 cm
978-3-030-51536-2 (9783030515362)
10.1007/978-3-030-51537-9
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt

Chithra Purushothaman is an independent foreign and security policy analyst based in Canada, and has a PhD in International Politics from Centre for International Politics, Organisation and Disarmament (CIPOD), Jawaharlal Nehru University. Dr Purushothaman has previously held research positions at Institute for Defence Studies and Analyses (IDSA), Centre for Policy Research (CPR) ad MyGov India.


CHAPTER 1: Introduction

1.1 Evolution of Foreign Aid

1.2 Theoretical Underpinnings

1.3 Bilateral Aid Architecture

1.3.1 North South Cooperation: The Established Donors

1.3.2 South-South Development Cooperation (SSDC)

1.4 The OECD vs. The Emerging Powers

1.5 Emerging Powers as Development Assistance Providers

1.6 Changing Identities and Motives of the Emerging Powers

1.7 Research Design

1.7.1 Rationale and Scope of the Book

1.7.2 Methodology

1.7.3 Data Sources

1.7.3.1 Brazil

1.7.3.2 China

1.7.3.3 India

1.8 Organisation of the Book

CHAPTER 2: Brazilian Cooperation for International Development (Cobradi)

2.1 Historical Overview

2.2 Brazilian Development Cooperation: An Instrument of Brazil's Economic Statecraft

2.2.1 Defining Brazil's Development Cooperation

2.2.2 Institutional Structures

2.2.3 Policy Framework

2.3 Patterns and Modalities of Development Cooperation

2.3.1 Geographical Patterns

2.3.1.1 Latin America and the Caribbean

2.3.1.2 Africa

2.3.1.3 Multilateral Development Cooperation

2.3.2 Modalities

2.4 Motivations and Agendas

2.4.1 Regional Solidarity and Neighbourhood Policy

2.4.2 Linguistic, Cultural and Historic Affinity

2.4.3 Trade, Business and Search for Markets

2.4.4 Diplomatic Reciprocity

2.5 Conclusion

CHAPTER 3: Chinese Development Assistance

2.1 Historical Overview of Chinese Development Assistance

2.2 Chinese Development Assistance: Spreading the Wings

2.2.1 Defining Chinese Development Assistance

2.2.2 Institutional Set-up

2.2.3 Development Assistance Policy

2.3 Geographical Outreach and Modalities of Assistance

2.3.1 Geographical Patterns

2.3.1.1 Africa

2.3.1.2 Asia

2.3.1.3 Latin America and the Caribbean

2.3.1.4 Multilateral Development Cooperation

2.3.2 Modalities

2.4 Motivations for Providing Development Cooperation

2.4.1 Search for Markets and Trade

2.4.2 Energy Security

2.4.3 Gaining Access to Natural Resources

2.4.4 Increasing Economic and Political Influence on Partner Countries

2.4.5 Enhancing Diplomatic Clout

2.5 Chinese Development Assistance: Prospects and Challenges

2.6 Conclusion

CHAPTER 4: Indian Development Cooperation (IDC)

4.1 Historical Overview

4.2 Indian Development Cooperation in the 21st Century

4.1.1 Definition

4.1.2 Institutional Structures

4.1.3 Policy Framework

4.3 Patterns of IDC Flows

4.1.1 Geographical Patterns

4.1.1.1 Asia

4.1.1.2 Africa

4.1.1.3 Latin America and the Caribbean

4.1.1.4 Multilateral Development Assistance

4.1.2 Sectoral Distribution

4.1.3 Modalities

4.1.3.1 ITEC

4.1.3.2 Lines of Credit (LOCs)

4.1.3.3 Grants/Loans

4.4 Motivations and Agendas

4.1.1 Regional Leadership

4.1.2 Trade, Markets and Business

4.1.3 Diplomatic Support

4.1.4 Permanent Seat in the United Nations Security Council (UNSC)

4.5 India, the Development Partner: Prospects and Challenges

4.6 Conclusion

CHAPTER 5: Comparing Brazil, China and India as Development Assistance Providers

5.1 Emerging Powers' Development Cooperation: Commonalities and Differences

5.1.1 Definitions

5.1.2 Institutions for Development Cooperation

5.1.3 Development Assistance Policies

5.1.4 Geographical Patterns

5.1.5 Modalities

5.1.6 Motivations Behind Emerging Powers' Development Assistance

5.1.7 Effectiveness of Development Cooperation

5.2 Competition and Cooperation amongst Brazil, China and India

5.1.1 Scope for Cooperation

5.1.2 Areas of Competition

5.3 Conclusion

CHAPTER 6: Conclusion
This book analyses the role of emerging powers as a development assistance providers and the nature of their development cooperation, their behaviour, motives and markedly their changing identities in international relations. With their growing economic and political clout, emerging powers are using economic instruments like foreign aid to ensure their position in the international system that is going through power shifts. By comparing three major emerging economies of the Global South- Brazil, India and China- this book would explore how emerging powers are changing the international aid architecture that is created and dominated by the traditional donors.
Chithra Purushothaman is an independent foreign and security policy analyst based in Canada, and has a PhD in International Politics from Centre for International Politics, Organisation and Disarmament (CIPOD), Jawaharlal Nehru University. Dr Purushothaman has previously held research positions at Institute for Defence Studies and Analyses (IDSA), Centre for Policy Research (CPR) ad MyGov India.

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