Computer Organization and Design

The Hardware/Software Interface, Third Edition
 
 
Morgan Kaufmann Publishers In
  • 3. Auflage
  • |
  • erschienen im August 2004
 
  • Buch
  • |
  • Softcover
  • |
  • 656 Seiten
978-1-55860-604-3 (ISBN)
 
Larry L. Peterson is a Professor of Computer Science at Princeton University. He has been involved in the design and evaluation of several network protocols, as well as the x-kernel and Scout operating systems. He is Editor-in-Chief of ACM Transactions on Computer Systems, has served on program committees for SOSP, SIGCOMM, OSDI, and ASPLOS, and is a member of the Internet's End-to-End Research Group.

Bruce Davie joined Cisco Systems in 1995, and was awarded recognition as a Cisco Fellow in 1998. He leads an architecture group with responsibility for the development of Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) and Quality of Service (QoS) capabilities for IP networks. He has more than 15 years of networking and communications industry experience. Some of his most prominent contributions to the industry include authoring numerous books, RFCs, journal articles, and conference papers on IP networking. He is also an active participant in both the Internet Engineering Task Force and the Internet Research Task Force, and is a senior member of the IEEE. Prior to joining Cisco, Bruce worked at Bell Communications Research (Bellcore) and led a number of networking research projects as director of internetworking research and chief scientist. He holds a Ph.D. in Computer Science from Edinburgh University and a B.E. from the University of Melbourne.

Computer Networks: A Systems Approach (Morgan Kaufmann), numerous journal articles, eleven RFCs, conference papers, and invited book chapters, Davie is an active participant of the IRTF and the IETF.
3rd ed.
  • Englisch
  • San Francisco
  • |
  • USA
Elsevier Science & Technology
  • Für höhere Schule und Studium
  • |
  • Für Beruf und Forschung
  • Neue Ausgabe
Illustrations
  • Höhe: 229 mm
  • |
  • Breite: 203 mm
  • 1000 gr
978-1-55860-604-3 (9781558606043)
1558606041 (1558606041)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
David A. Patterson was the first in his family to graduate from college (1969 A.B UCLA), and he enjoyed it so much that he didn't stop until a PhD, (1976 UCLA). After 4 years developing a wafer-scale computer at Hughes Aircraft, he joined U.C. Berkeley in 1977.
He spent 1979 at DEC working on the VAX minicomputer. He and colleagues later developed the Reduced Instruction Set Computer (RISC). By joining forces with IBMs 801 and Stanfords MIPS projects, RISC became widespread. In 1984 Sun Microsystems recruited him to start the SPARC architecture. In 1987, Patterson and colleagues wondered if tried building dependable storage systems from the new PC disks. This led to the popular Redundant Array of Inexpensive Disks (RAID). He spent 1989 working on the CM-5 supercomputer. Patterson and colleagues later tried building a supercomputer using standard desktop computers and switches. The resulting Network of Workstations (NOW) project led to cluster technology used by many startups. He is now working on the Recovery Oriented Computing (ROC) project.
In the past, he served as Chair of Berkeley's CS Division, Chair and CRA. He is currently serving on the IT advisory committee to the U.S. President and has just been elected President of the ACM.
All this resulted in 150 papers, 5 books, and the following honors, some shared with friends: election to the National Academy of Engineering; from the University of California: Outstanding Alumnus Award (UCLA Computer Science Department), McEntyre Award for Excellence in Teaching (Berkeley Computer Science), Distinguished Teaching Award (Berkeley); from ACM: fellow, SIGMOD Test of Time Award, Karlstrom Outstanding Educator Award; from IEEE: fellow, Johnson Information Storage Award, Undergraduate Teaching Award, Mulligan Education Medal, and von Neumann Medal.
John L. Hennessy is the president of Stanford University, where he has been a member of the faculty since 1977 in the departments of electrical engineering and computer science. Hennessy is a fellow of the IEEE and the ACM, a member of the National Academy of Engineering, the National Academy of Science, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the Spanish Royal Academy of Engineering. He received the 2001 Eckert-Mauchly Award for his contributions to RISC technology, the 2001 Seymour Cray Computer Engineering Award, and shared the John von Neumann award in 2000 with David Patterson.
After completing the project in 1984, he took a one-year leave from the university to co-found MIPS Computer Systems, which developed one of the first commercial RISC microprocessors. After being acquired by Silicon Graphics in 1991, MIPS Technologies became an independent company in 1998, focusing on microprocessors for the embedded marketplace. As of 2004, over 300 million MIPS microprocessors have been shipped in devices ranging from video games and palmtop computers to laser printers and network switches.
Hennessy's more recent research at Stanford focuses on the area of designing and exploiting multiprocessors. He helped lead the design of the DASH multiprocessor architecture, the first distributed shared-memory multiprocessors supporting cache coherency, and the basis for several commercial multiprocessor designs, including the Silicon Graphics Origin multiprocessors. Since becoming president of Stanford, revising and updating this text and the more advanced Computer Architecture: A Quantitative Approach has become a primary form of recreation and relaxation.
Computer Abstractions and Technology
2 Instructions: Language of the Computer
3 Arithmetic for Computers
4 Assessing and Understanding Performance
5 The Processor: Datapath and Control
6 Enhancing Performance with Pipelining
7 Large and Fast: Exploiting Memory Hierarchy
8 Storage, Networks, and Other Peripherals
On the CD:

9 Multiprocessors
Appendix A: Assemblers, Linkers, and the Spim simulator
Appendix B: The Basics of Logic Design
Appendix C: Mapping Control to Hardware
Appendix D: A Survey of RISC Architectures for Desktop, Server, and Embedded Computers
The choice of Real Stuff is judicious. The Computers in the Real World sections are interesting to read and should widen the horizons of the too often too tech-oriented Sophomores and Juniors. On the whole this is a very solid book and the success of the third edition is assured as has been the success of its two predecessors. Jean-Loup Baer, University of Washington I am very impressed with the new sections 'Computers in the Real World.' It is very interesting and speaks to the students who would like to feel a connection between classroom materials and real-world applications. I am very pleased with the manuscript for the third edition. This revision is well-updated and a comprehensive introduction to the hardware and software fundamentals. David Brooks, Harvard University The logical development and explanations and examples were always great to begin with. The Historical Perspectives have become even better-- they are part of the book that I enjoy most. David Harris, Harvey Mudd

Versand in 3-4 Wochen

49,00 €
inkl. 7% MwSt.
in den Warenkorb

Abholung vor Ort? Sehr gerne!
Unsere Web-Seiten verwenden Cookies. Mit der Nutzung des WebShops erklären Sie sich damit einverstanden. Mehr Informationen finden Sie in unserem Datenschutzhinweis. Ok