Reflections on Jean Améry

Torture, Resentment, and Homelessness as the Mind's Limits
 
 
Palgrave Macmillan (Verlag)
  • erschienen im Februar 2019
 
  • Buch
  • |
  • Hardcover
  • |
  • XI, 147 Seiten
978-3-030-02344-7 (ISBN)
 
This book elaborates Jean Améry's critique of philosophy and his discussion of some central philosophical themes in At the Mind's Limits and his other writings. It shows how Améry elaborates the shortcomings and unfitness of philosophical theories to account for torture, the experience of homelessness, and other indignities, and their inability to assist with overcoming resentment. It thus teases out the philosophical import of Jean Améry's critique of philosophy, which constitutes his own philosophical testament of being an inmate at Auschwitz. This book situates At the Mind's Limits in the context of twentieth-century Continental philosophy. On the one hand, it elaborates Améry's engagement with key philosophical figures. On the other hand, it shows how thoroughly Améry denounces the limits of the philosophical enterprise, and its impotence in capturing and accounting for the crimes of the Third Reich.
2019
  • Englisch
  • Cham
  • |
  • Schweiz
Springer International Publishing
  • Für Beruf und Forschung
Bibliographie
  • Höhe: 216 mm
  • |
  • Breite: 153 mm
  • |
  • Dicke: 13 mm
  • 328 gr
978-3-030-02344-7 (9783030023447)
10.1007/978-3-030-02345-4
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt

Vivaldi Jean-Marie is a Professor of Philosophy at the City University of New York. He also holds an ongoing appointment as an adjunct Professor of Philosophy and African-American Studies at the IRAAS at Columbia University. He is the author of Fanon: Collective Ethics and Humanism (2007), Kierkegaard: History and Eternal Happiness (2008), and Voodoo Cosmology and the Haitian Revolution in the Enlightenment Ideals of Kant and Hegel (2018). He has published articles in the following peer-reviewed journals: Gnosis, The Western Journal of Black Studies, Souls, and The CLR James Journal. He was Scholar-in-Residence at Hertford College, Oxford University during the Summer 2015.

Chapter 1: Memory, the Jewish Intellectual and Cartesian Cogito

Chapter 2: Torture & Homelessness: The Horrible Can Make No Claim to Singularity

Chapter 3: Améry and Nietzsche on Resentment, Collective Guilt, and Historical Revisionism

Chapter 4: Améry and Sartre: The Necessity and Impossibility of Being an Authentic Jew

Chapter 5: Conclusion

This book elaborates Jean Améry's critique of philosophy and his discussion of some central philosophical themes in At the Mind's Limits and his other writings. It shows how Améry elaborates the shortcomings and unfitness of philosophical theories to account for torture, the experience of homelessness, and their inability to assist with overcoming resentment. It thus teases out the philosophical import of Jean Améry's At the Mind's Limits and his critique of philosophy, which constitutes his own philosophical testament while being an inmate Auschwitz. This book situates At the Mind's Limits in the context of twentieth century Continental philosophy. On the one hand, it elaborates Améry's engagement with key philosophical figures. On the other hand, it shows that, in every chapter, Améry is denouncing the limits of philosophical theories to capture and articulate the lived experiences of the tortured, resentful, and homeless communities who bore the brunt of the Third Reich.

Sofort lieferbar

69,54 €
inkl. 5% MwSt.
in den Warenkorb