The Arabian Seas: Biodiversity, Environmental Challenges and Conservation Measures

 
 
Springer (Verlag)
  • erscheint ca. am 25. Dezember 2020
 
  • Buch
  • |
  • Hardcover
  • |
  • X, 1390 Seiten
978-3-030-51505-8 (ISBN)
 

The Arabian Seas Marine Region encompasses marine areas from Djibouti to Pakistan, including the northern part of Somalia, the Red Sea, the Arabian/Persian Gulf, and parts of the Arabian Sea.

Human pressures on the coastal and marine environments are evident throughout the region, and have resulted in harmful environmental effects. Oil and domestic, urban and industrial pollutants in several areas of this part of the world have caused local habitat degradation, eutrophication and algal blooms. Further, coastal landfill, dredging, and sedimentation, as well as nutrient and sediment runoff from phosphate mining, agriculture and grazing, and reduction in freshwater seepage due to groundwater extraction are all contributing to the degradation of coastal environments.

This book discusses aspects not covered in other books on the region, which largely focus on marine biodiversity, and examines several environmental challenges that are often ignored, but which have a significant impact on the environment. Evaluating the status quo, it also recommends conservation measures and examines the abiotic factors that play a major main role in the environmental changes. Lastly, the book addresses the biodiversity of the area, providing a general context for the conservation and management measures discussed.

1st ed. 2021
  • Englisch
  • Cham
  • |
  • Schweiz
Springer International Publishing
  • Für Beruf und Forschung
  • 148
  • |
  • 262 farbige Abbildungen, 262 farbige Tabellen, 148 s/w Abbildungen
  • |
  • 262 Tables, color; 262 Illustrations, color; 148 Illustrations, black and white; X, 1390 p. 410 illus., 262 illus. in color.
  • Höhe: 23.5 cm
  • |
  • Breite: 15.5 cm
978-3-030-51505-8 (9783030515058)
10.1007/978-3-030-51506-5
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt

Laith A. Jawad obtained MSc in Fish Taxonomy from the Zoology Department, University of Bristol, UK, in 1980. He then worked as a fish taxonomist at Basrah University, Iraq, for more than 20 years before moving to New Zealand in 1997. During this time, he founded the biochemical taxonomy of fishes of Iraq and published over 400 scientific papers and book reviews in leading scientific journals. He is the author and co-author of several biology textbooks published in Arabic. Recently, he contributed five chapters to the book Coastal Fishes: Habitat, Behaviour and Conservation, published by Nova Publishers, Canada. He also authored the book Dangerous Fishes of the Eastern and Southern Arabian Peninsula, published by Springer in 2017. He served as a fish biodiversity expert and consultant at the Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries in Oman between 2008 and 2012, during which he co-authored two papers describing a new fish species in the Omani waters and reported over 80 fish species in Omani waters. He authored a guide to the fishes of the southern coasts of Oman published by the Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries in Oman in 2018. He also published over 90 papers on the fish fauna of Oman, Iraq, Kuwait, and Saudi Arabia. In 2013, he started research collaborations with over 100 scientists from more than 50 countries around the globe investigating various aspects of fish taxonomy and ichthyology.

The Arabian seas: Biodiversity, Environmental Challenges and Conservation Measures

Preliminary content table

Note: the authors affiliations are listed at the end of the TOC.

Part 1: Biology of the Arabian Seas

Chapter 1. Marine biogeography

Marine organisms at the edge of the biogeographical provinces

RJ Toonen, BW Bowen, M Iacchei, JC Briggs

Chapter 2. Major biotopes

Phytoplankton Zooplankton Ichthyoplankton Sea gras

Mangrove Invertebrates Fishes Sea turtles Sea birds

Marine mammals Least concern organisms

Bahram K. Maulood, Sergio Teggi, J.O. Bosire, F. Dahdouh-Guebas, M. Walton

Alessandro Sacca, Giovanni Giuffre, Baldwin, Robert; Collins, Tim

Chapter 3. Biodiversity aspects

Status genetic markers in management of biodiversity Agricultural and Industrial Runoff Effect of biodiversity on ecosystem functioning Endemism Threat Protection Conservation

Bradley J. Pusey, Mark J. Kennard, Helen K. Larson,

Quentin Alsop , Michael Hammer, Duncan J. Buckle, Subrata Trivedi, Alana Grech, Katie Chartrand-Miller, Paul Erftemeijer, Mark Fonseca, Len McKenzie, Michael Rasheed, Helen Taylor, Rob Coles

Chapter 4. Coral reefs

Status Distribution Bleaching event Coral communities Artificial reefs and habitats Threat Treatment and solution

Conservation

Andrew G. Bauman, David A. Feary, Scott F. Heron, Morgan S. Pratchett, John A. Burt, Edward G. Smith, Christopher Warren, Jennifer Dupont

Chapter 5. Shipwreck ecology

Allocation and management Impact on biota Marine biodiversity hotspot

DR Schiel, PM Ross, CN Battershill, Eduardo Barros Fagundes-Netto, Luiz Ricardo Gaelzer, Ricardo Coutinho, Ilana R. Zalmon

Chapter 6. Harmful algae

Fish kill Red Tide

Patricia M. Glibert, Jan H. Landsberg, Joyce J. Evans, Bernhard M. Riegl, Andrew W. Bruckner, Kaveh Samimi-Namin, and Sam J. Purkis, Andrew G. Bauman, John A. Burt c, David A. Feary, Elise Marquis, Paolo Usseglio

Chapter 7. Biological invasion

Pathways and effects on alien species Biosecurity Genetic perspective Threat to biodiversity Effects

Anna Occhipinti-Ambrogia, Bella Galil, Stelios Katsanevakis, Marta Coll, ChiaraPiroddi, Jeroen Steenbeek, Frida Ben Rais Lasram, Argyro Zenetos, Ana Cristina Cardoso, Betsy Von Holle, Daniel Simberloff, Melodie A. McGeoch, Stuart H. M. Butchart, Dian Spear, Elrike Marais, Elizabeth J. Kleynhans, Andy Symes, Janice Chanson, Michael

Part 2: The Ar

abian Seas as a Place on Earth

Chapter 8. Environmental factors

Physical factors Chemical factors Hydrology Oceanography

Climate

Thomaskutty Varghese, Sharon L. Smith, Richard C. Thompson

Chapter 9. Natural events

Monsoon Protective measure Upwelling Dust storms

S. S. Aralikatti, Raman Aishwarya, Takeshi Izumo, E. Zorita

Chapter 10. Geology

Short review of the formation the Arabian Seas

Carmen Gaina, Douwe J. J. van Hinsbergen, Adnan A.M. Aqrawi, Andrew D. Horbury, Jennifer Smith, C. Jones, A. Milewski, R. Becker,

Chapter 11. Islands

Failaka island, Kuwait Qeshm Island, Iran Mesirah, Oman Socotra Island, Yemen Dahlak Island, Eritrea Farasan, Saudi Arabia

Marcelo Kovacic, Sergey V. Bogorodsky, W. Gladstone, Nancy Papathanasopoulou, Natarajan Gajendran, Reza Naderloo, P.A. Pirazzolia, J.-L. Reyssb, M. Fon

tugneb, A. Haghipourc, A. Hilgerse, H.U. Kasperf, H. Nazarid, F. Preussere, U. Radtkee

Part 3: People and the Arabian Seas

Chapter 12. Historical perspective

Ancient Fishing gear Ancient Fishing methods Catching fish for profit

Vladimir F. Stolba, Robert Carter, Dionisius A. Agius,

Chapter 13. Natural resources

Primary productivity Secondary productivity Fisheries Fishing gear and methods Fishing boats Bycatch and discards Artisanal fisheries Illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing overfishing Effect of strong fisheries management Space management of fisheries Fisheries dependent communities Threat Conservation.

Dalal Al-Abdulrazzak , Dirk Zeller, Dyhia Belhabib, Dawit Tesfamichael, Daniel Pauly, S.J.M. Blaber, S.P. Griffiths, R. Pillans, Dawit Tesfamichael, Tony J. Pitcher, Marta Coll1, Simone Libralato, Sergi Tudela, Isabel Palomera1,

Fabio Pranovi

Chapter 14. Food Security

Status Challenges Future availability

Richard O. Abila, Simon Jennings, Grant D Stentiford, Ana M Leocadio, Keith R Jeffery, Julian D Metcalfe, Ioanna Katsiadaki, Neil A Auchterlonie, Stephen C Mangi, John K Pinnegar, Tim Ellis, Edmund J Peeler, Tiziana, Luisetti

Chapter 15. The Sea and human health

Dangerous fishes Rising tide Disasters

Laith A. Jawad

Chapter 16. Environmental challenges

Pollution Climate Evaporation Desalination Marine Debris Plastics as debris Tourism Turbidity in estuaries Physiological and behavioral changes.

Thomaskutty Varghese, Shailesh Nayak, Gangadhara Bhat, Sharon L. Gilman, QI ZHANG, KUNDE YANG, YANG SHI, Roberto Danovaro, Laura Carugati, Marco Berzano, P. Usseglio, P. F. Sale, G. H. Cavalcante

Chapter 17. Conservation

Habitat recovery and restorat

ion Strategic plans and Policy Options

Philip Tortell, Henn Ojaveer, Bella S. Galil, Marnie L. Campbell, James T. Carlton, João Canning-Clode, Elizabeth J. Cook, Alisha D. Davidson, Chad L. Hewitt, Anders Jelmert, Agnese Marchini, Cynthia H. McKenzie, Hanneke Van Lavieren, John Burt, David A. Feary, Geórgenes Cavalcante, Elise Marquis, Lisa Benedetti, Charles Trick, Björn Kjerfve, and Peter F. Sale

Researchers considered as authors for the chapters:

1. Clayton Rubec

Environmental Stewardship and Conservation Consultant 495 Athlone Avenue, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1Z 5M9.

2. Dr. Azzam Alwash

Nature Iraq Organisation

3. Prof. Edward Maltby

University of Liverpool, School of Environmental Science, Liverpool, UK.

4. Mr. Richard Porter

BirdLife International

5. Kelly P. Goodwin

Millennium Relief and Development Services, Nongovernmental Organization, Basrah, Iraq

6. Michelle L. Stevens

7. Bahram K. Maulood

Twin Rivers Institute, American University of Iraq, Sulaimania, Iraq.

8. Maria Pala

Dipartimento di Genetica e Microbiologia, Università di Pavia, Via Ferrata 1,

27100 Pavia, Italy

9. Vincenza Battaglia

Dipartimento di Genetica e Microbiologia, Università di Pavia, Via Ferrata 1,

27100 Pavia, Italy

10. Viola Grugni

27100 Pavia, Italy

11. Anna Olivieri

Dipartimento di Genetica e Microbiologia, Università di Pavia, Via Ferrata 1,

27100 Pavia, Italy

12. Antonio Torroni

Dipartimento di Genetica e Microbiologia, Università di Pavia, Via Ferrata 1,

27100 Pavia, Italy

13. Augusta S Santachiara-Benerecetti

Dipartimento di Genetica e Microbiologia, Università di Pavia, Via Ferrata 1,

27100 Pavia, Italy

14. Ornella Semino

Dipartimento di Genetica e Microbiologia, Università di Pavia, Via Ferrata 1,

27100 Pavia, Italy

15. Sven Knutsson

Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Lulea University of Technolo

gy, Sweden.

16. Jean-Claude Plaziat

Département des Sciences de la Terre, Bâtiment 504, Université de Paris-Sud, F-91405 Orsay, France

17. J. Robert BRITTON

National Fisheries Laboratory, Environment Agency, Bornholm Lane, Brampton Huntingdon,

Cambridgeshire PE28 4NE, England, UK

18. G. H. Copp

Centre for Conservation Ecology and Environmental Science, Bournemouth University, Poole, Dorset, United Kingdom

19. Dr. Jörg Freyhof
Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries, IGB
Müggelseedamm 310, 12587 Berlin, Germany

20. M. O. Son

Kovalevsky Institute of Biology of the Southern Seas (Odessa Branch), National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Odessa, 65125 Ukraine

21. Peter K.

L. Ng

Tropical Marine Science Institute and Department of Biological Sciences, National University of Singapore, Kent Ridge, Singapore 119260, Republic of Singapore.

22. Dwi Listyo Rahayu

Marine Bio-industry Implementation Unit-Research Center for Oceanography, Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI), P.O. Box 1124, Mataram 83000, NTB, Indonesia.

23. B. G. Warner

Department of Earth and Environmental Science,

University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1, Canada

24. W. D. Taylor

Department of Biology, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1, Canada

25. Brian W. Coad

Canadian Museum of Nature, P. O. Box 3443, Station D, Ottawa, ON K1P 6P4, Canada.

26. Curtis J. Richardson

Nicholas School of Environment and Earth Sciences, Du

ke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA.

27. Richard Porter

BirdLife International, Cambridge, United Kingdom

28. Clayton Rubec

Centre for Environmental Stewardship and Conservation, Ottawa, Canada

29. William J. Mitsch

Everglades Wetland Research Park, Juliet C. Sproul Chair for Southwest Florida Habitat Restoration and Management, 110 Kapnick Center, Florida Gulf Coast University, 4940 Bayshore Drive, Naples, FL 34112, USA

Professor Emeritus, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA

30. Stuart Leiderman

31. Steve Lonergan

32. Robert France

33. Edward Maltby

School of Environmental Science, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK

34. Mike C. Acreman

Centre for Ecology and Hydrol

ogy, Crowmarsh Gifford, Wallingford, OX10 8BB, UK

35. J. W. Dellapenna

Villanova University, USA

36. Chuanmin Hu

College of Marine Science, University of South Florida, 140 Seventh Avenue, South, St. Petersburg, FL 33701, USA

37. Rob G. Bijlsma

Centre for Ecological and Evolutionary Studies (CEES), University of Groningen, P.O. Box 11103, 9700 CC Groningen, The Netherlands

38. Maarten Platteeuw

Doldersummerweg 1, 7983 LD Wapse, The Netherlands

39. Mennobart R. van Eerden

Rijkswaterstaat Waterdienst, P.O. Box 17, 8200 AA Lelystad, The Netherland

40. Christopher Reed

41. Dorothy Bonn

42. Richard H. Becker

Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Toledo, 2801 W Bancroft Ave, Toledo, OH 43606, USA.

43. Keith G. Tidball

Cornell University

44. Marianne Krasny

Cornell University

45. Hanne Kirstine Adriansen

Danish Institute for International Studies Strandgade 56 DK-1401 Copenhagen K, Denmark.

46. Royce J. Bitzer

Department of Entomology, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011-3140

47. Adnan A.M. Aqrawi

Development and Innovation (RDI), Innovation-Agents and Networks at Statoil, based in Stavanger, Norway.

aamaq@statoil.com

48. Andrew D. Horbury

Carbonate Geologist with Cambridge Carbonates

andy@cambridgecarbonates.co.uk

49. Govand H. Sherwani

Director General of Scholarships and Cultural Relations, Ministry of Higher Education, Kurdistan Regional Government (KRG), Iraq since 2009.

Govand.sherwani@mhe-krg.org

50. A. Asa Eger

University of North Carolina, Greensboro

51. Carrie Hritz

Department of Anthropology, The Pennsylvania State University, 516 Carpenter Building, University Park, PA 16802-3405,

cah52@psu.edu

52. Jennifer Pournelle

University of South Carolina, Environment and Sustainability Program, School of Earth, Ocean, and Environment, Byrnes Building, Suite 430 A, 901 Sumter Street, Columbia, SC 29208

jpournelle@en

viron.sc.edu

53. Jennifer Smith

Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Washington University in St. Louis, Campus Box 1169, 1 Brookings Drive, St. Louis, MO. 63130

jensmith@wustl.edu

54. C. Jones

Department of Geosciences, Western Michigan University, 1903 West Michigan Avenue, Kalamazoo, MI 49008, USA

55. E. Yan

Environmental Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Chicago, IL, USA.

56. A. Milewski

Department of Geosciences, Western Michigan University, 1903 West Michigan Avenue, Kalamazoo, MI 49008, USA

57. R. Becker a

Department of Geosciences, Western Michigan University, 1903 West Michigan Avenue, Kalamazoo, MI 49008, USA

58. Francesca Despini

Univ. of Modena and Reggio Emilia (Italy)

59. Sergio Teggi

Univ. of Modena and Reggio Emilia (Italy)

60. Lorenza Bovio<, Francesco Immordino

MED INGEGNERIA (Italy)

61. Richard Becker

Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Toledo, 2801 Bancroft Ave, Toledo, OH 43606, USA richard.becker@utoledo.edu

62. Kyle Winfield

Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Toledo, 2801 Bancroft Ave, Toledo, OH 43606, USA

63. Jonathon Sanders

Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Toledo, 2081 West Bancroft Ave, Toledo, OH 43606

64. Dr. Carrie Hritz

Department of Anthropology The Pennsylvania State University 516 Carpenter Building University Park, PA 16802-3405

cah52@psu.edu

65. Dr. Jennifer Pournelle

Director, MEERM-AWNES University of South Carolina Environment and Sustainability Program School of Earth, Ocean, and Environment Byrnes Building, Suite 430 A 901 Sumter Street Columbia, SC 29208

jpournelle@environ.sc.edu

66. Dr. Jennifer Smith

Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences Washington University in St. Louis Campus Box 1169 1 Brookings Drive St. Louis, MO. 63130

jensmith@wustl.edu

67. Timothy J. Page

Centre for Riverine Landscapes, Griffith University, Queensland, Australia

t.page@griffith.edu.au

68. Jacquelyn C. Crook

United States Navy B.S., United States Naval Academy

69. Jonathan Chenoweth

Centre for Environmental Strategy, University of Surrey, Guildford, UK.

70. Panos Hadjinicolaou

Energy, Environment and Water Research Center, Cyprus Institute, Nicosia,

Cyprus.

71. Adriana Bruggeman

Energy, Environment and Water Research Center, Cyprus Institute, Nicosia, Cyprus.

72. Jos Lelieveld

Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Mainz, Germany

73. Elena Xoplaki

Institute of Geography, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland

74. William J. Mitsch

Tuttle Wilma H. Schiermeier Olentangy River Wetland Research Park The Ohio State University

75. Li Zhang

Tuttle Wilma H. Schiermeier Olentangy River Wetland Research Park The Ohio State University

76. Sven E. Jørgensen

University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark

The Arabian Seas Marine Region encompasses marine areas from Djibouti to Pakistan, including the northern part of Somalia, the Red Sea, the Arabian/Persian Gulf, and parts of the Arabian Sea.

Human pressures on the coastal and marine environments are evident throughout the region, and have resulted in harmful environmental effects. Oil and domestic, urban and industrial pollutants in several areas of this part of the world have caused local habitat degradation, eutrophication and algal blooms. Further, coastal landfill, dredging, and sedimentation, as well as nutrient and sediment runoff from phosphate mining, agriculture and grazing, and reduction in freshwater seepage due to groundwater extraction are all contributing to the degradation of coastal environments.

This book discusses aspects not covered in other books on the region, which largely focus on marine biodiversity, and examines several environmental challenges that are often ignored, but which have a significant impact on the environment. Evaluating the status quo, it also recommends conservation measures and examines the abiotic factors that play a major main role in the environmental changes. Lastly, the book addresses the biodiversity of the area, providing a general context for the conservation and management measures discussed.

Noch nicht erschienen

267,49 €
inkl. 5% MwSt.
Vorbestellen