Desire for Development

Whiteness, Gender, and the Helping Imperative
 
 
Wilfrid Laurier University Press
  • erschienen am 1. Juli 2007
 
  • Buch
  • |
  • Softcover
  • |
  • 204 Seiten
978-1-55458-001-9 (ISBN)
 
Draws on post-structuralist notions of subjectivity, race and space theory, feminism, colonial and postcolonial studies, and travel writing to trace colonial continuities in the post-development recollections of white Canadian women who have worked in Africa.
  • Englisch
  • Waterloo, Ontario
  • |
  • Kanada
  • Für Beruf und Forschung
  • Höhe: 229 mm
  • |
  • Breite: 154 mm
  • |
  • Dicke: 15 mm
  • 312 gr
978-1-55458-001-9 (9781554580019)
1554580013 (1554580013)
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A former development worker in Zambia (1981-1992), Barbara Heron is an associate professor in the School of Social Work, York University. Her research focuses on whiteness and the helping imperative and how these issues play out in the development context. Barbara Heron has published in the Journal of Gender Studies , International Social Work , and Critical Social Work.
Challenging the Development Work(er) Narrative; Where Do Development Workers Really Come From?; Development Is ... a Relational Experience; Negotiating Subject Positions, Constituting Selves; Participants' Retrospectives: Complicating Desire; Summing Up, Drawing Conclusions; Index.
Who has not thought about going to the Third World to help? Heron pushes our buttons when she argues that helping can be the oldest colonial move. Perceptive, stunning in its honesty, yet unwilling to dismiss helping altogether, this book helps us to thread our way through the moral complexities of the First World position of colonizers who now set out to improve the very societies they continue to exploit. This resolutely anti-colonial study of whiteness and gender is crucial for thinking critically about development.''--Sherene Razack ``Who has not thought about going to the Third World to help? Heron pushes our buttons when she argues that helping can be the oldest colonial move. Perceptive, stunning in its honesty, yet unwilling to dismiss helping altogether, this book helps us to thread our way through the moral complexities of the First World position of colonizers who now set out to improve the very societies they continue to exploit. This resolutely anti-colonial study of whiteness and gender is crucial for thinking critically about development.''--Sherene Razack

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