The Corseted Skeleton

A Bioarchaeology of Corseting
 
 
Palgrave Macmillan (Verlag)
  • erscheint ca. am 26. November 2020
 
  • Buch
  • |
  • Softcover
978-3-030-50391-8 (ISBN)
 

Unpacking contemporary assumptions about corseting, Rebecca Gibson supplements the narratives of corseted women with bioarchaeological data to approach the corset from the lived experiences of women who wore them. An undergarment that provided support and shape for centuries, the corset occupies a familiar but exotic space in modern consciousness, created by two sometimes contradictory narrative arcs: the texts that women wrote regarding their own corseting experiences and the recorded opinions of the medical community during the 19th century. Combining these texts with skeletal age data and rib and vertebrae measurements from remains dating from 1700 to 1900, the author discusses corseting in terms of longevity, situates corseting as an everyday practice that crossed urban socio-economic boundaries, and attests to the practice as part of normal female life during the 18th and 19th century. The interweaving of these three narratives establishes the corset as something beyond a mere fashion choice: the corset becomes an exoskeleton or "social skin," a both literal and figurative way to protect herself from the outside world.

1st ed. 2020
  • Englisch
  • Cham
  • |
  • Schweiz
Springer International Publishing
  • Für Beruf und Forschung
  • 40 farbige Abbildungen
  • |
  • 40 Illustrations, color; Approx. 225 p. 40 illus. in color.
  • Höhe: 21 cm
  • |
  • Breite: 14.8 cm
978-3-030-50391-8 (9783030503918)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt

Rebecca Gibson is Assistant Professor at the University of Notre Dame, specializing in bioanthropology. Her research circulates around skeletal structures, AI and robotics in fiction, and science fiction narratives of the "other."

Chapter 1: Introduction: Shaping the Garment, Shaping the Woman

Chapter 2: The Corset in our Collective Consciousness: Exotic, Erotic, or Other?

Chapter 3: The Corset as a Garment: Is it a Representative of Who Wore It?

Chapter 4: The Corset as Civilization: The Debate on Clothing and Women's Social Wellbeing

Chapter 5: The Corset as a Killer: Did Corseting Negatively Impact Longevity?

Chapter 6: Women's Experiences in Life, Death, and Burial: The St. Bride's Parish Records Chapter 7: The Corseted Skeleton: Skeletal Remains of St. Bride's Lower Churchyard

Chapter 8: Conclusion: Modern Corseting and How We Talk About Today's Women

Unpacking contemporary assumptions about corseting, Rebecca Gibson supplements the narratives of corseted women with bioarchaeological data to approach the corset from the lived experiences of women who wore them. An undergarment that provided support and shape for centuries, the corset occupies a familiar but exotic space in modern consciousness, created by two sometimes contradictory narrative arcs: the texts that women wrote regarding their own corseting experiences and the recorded opinions of the medical community during the 19th century. Combining these texts with skeletal age data and rib and vertebrae measurements from remains dating from 1700 to 1900, the author discusses corseting in terms of longevity, situates corseting as an everyday practice that crossed urban socio-economic boundaries, and attests to the practice as part of normal female life during the 18th and 19th century. The interweaving of these three narratives establishes the corset as something beyond a mere fashion choice: the corset becomes an exoskeleton or "social skin," a both literal and figurative way to protect herself from the outside world.

Noch nicht erschienen

ca. 26,74 €
inkl. 7% MwSt.
Vorbestellen