Identity, Trust, and Reconciliation in East Asia

Dealing with Painful History to Create a Peaceful Present
 
 
Palgrave Macmillan (Verlag)
  • erschienen am 23. August 2018
 
  • Buch
  • |
  • Softcover
  • |
  • 320 Seiten
978-3-319-85513-4 (ISBN)
 
This edited collection explores how East Asia's painful history continues to haunt the relationships between its countries and peoples. Through a largely social-psychological and constructivist lens, the authors examine the ways in which historical memory and unmet identity needs generates mutual suspicion, xenophobic nationalism and tensions in the bilateral and trilateral relationships within the region. This text not only addresses some of the domestic drivers of Japanese, Chinese and South Korean foreign policy - and the implications of increasingly autocratic rule in all three countries - but also analyses the way in which new security mechanisms and processes advancing trust, confidence and reconciliation can replace those generating mistrust, antagonism and insecurity.
Softcover reprint of the original 1st ed. 2018
  • Englisch
  • Cham
  • |
  • Schweiz
Springer International Publishing
  • Für Beruf und Forschung
  • 2 s/w Abbildungen
  • |
  • 2 Illustrations, black and white; XV, 302 p. 2 illus.
  • Höhe: 210 mm
  • |
  • Breite: 148 mm
  • |
  • Dicke: 17 mm
  • 416 gr
978-3-319-85513-4 (9783319855134)
10.1007/978-3-319-54897-5
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
Professor Kevin Clements is the Foundation Chair of Peace and Conflict Studies and Director of the New Zealand National Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies (NCPACS) at the University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand, and Secretary General of the International Peace Research Association.
Chapter 1:Trust, Identity and Conflict in Northeast Asia - Barriers to Positive RelationshipsKevin P. Clements
Chapter 2:
Identity, Threat Perception, and Trust-Building in Northeast Asia
Geun Lee
Chapter 3:
Identity Tensions and China-Japan-Korea Relations:Can Peace be Maintained in North East Asia?Rex Li
Chapter 4:
Historical Analogy and Demonization of Others: Memories of 1930s Japanese Militarism and Its Contemporary implications Chung-in Moon and Seung-won Suh
Chapter 5:
The "Abnormal" State: Identity, Norm/Exception and JapanLinus Hagström
Chapter 6:
Basic Human Needs: Identity and Intractable ConflictAjin Choi and Jihwan Hwang
Chapter 7:
Historical Memory and Northeast Asian Regional Politics: from a Chinese PerspectiveXiaoming Zhang
Chapter 8:
Towards True Independence: Abe Shinzo's NationalismMasaru Tamamoto
Chapter 9:
History, Politics, and Identity in JapanKoichi Nakano
Chapter 10:
Trust and Trust-Building in Northeast Asia: The Need for Empathy for Japan-ROK-China Security Cooperation - A Japanese Security PerspectiveYamaguchi Noboru and Sano Shutaro
Chapter 11:
Japan's Article 9 in the East Asian PeaceStein Tønnesson
Chapter 12:
Apology and Forgiveness in East Asia Ria Shibata
"The volume is an excellent starting point to understand the difficulties of reconciliation and closer collaboration in the region. With its well-rounded choice of authors and their empathetic efforts, combined with the very thoughtful and balanced summary by the editor, the book provides a valuable contribution not only to political and sociological practice, but to academic research as well." (H-Soz-Kult, hsozkult.de, January, 31 , 2019)
 

"The volume is an excellent starting point to understand the difficulties of reconciliation and closer collaboration in the region. With its well-rounded choice of authors and their empathetic efforts, combined with the very thoughtful and balanced summary by the editor, the book provides a valuable contribution not only to political and sociological practice, but to academic research as well." (H-Soz-Kult, hsozkult.de, January, 31 , 2019)

This edited collection explores how East Asia's painful history continues to haunt the relationships between its countries and peoples. Through a largely social-psychological and constructivist lens, the authors examine the ways in which historical memory and unmet identity needs generates mutual suspicion, xenophobic nationalism and tensions in the bilateral and trilateral relationships within the region. This text not only addresses some of the domestic drivers of Japanese, Chinese and South Korean foreign policy - and the implications of increasingly autocratic rule in all three countries - but also analyses the way in which new security mechanisms and processes advancing trust, confidence and reconciliation can replace those generating mistrust, antagonism and insecurity.

Versand in 10-15 Tagen

139,09 €
inkl. 7% MwSt.
in den Warenkorb