Physics of Megathrust Earthquakes

 
 
Birkhäuser (Verlag)
  • erscheint ca. am 11. Mai 2020
 
  • Buch
  • |
  • Softcover
  • |
  • X, 240 Seiten
978-3-030-43571-4 (ISBN)
 

This topical volume on the physics of megathrust earthquakes investigates many aspects of the earthquake phenomenon, from the geodynamic setting of subduction zones, to interseismic and postseismic deformation, slow-slip events, dynamic rupture, and tsunami generation.

The dynamics of the seismic cycle at megathrusts is rich in various types of earthquakes, many of which only recently discovered. Our early understanding of the earthquake phenomenon was a type of stick-slip motion, where the fault is loaded by tectonic forces for an extended period, followed by rapid failure. Extensive seismic and geodetic monitoring of subduction zones has revealed a much more varied seismic behavior, where episodic fault slip can occur at any slip velocity between the background loading rate, of the order of a few atoms per second, and the fast seismic range, about a meter per second. Events that fill the gap between slow creep and fast ruptures include a host of slow earthquakes. Subduction zones therefore provide a natural laboratory to better understand the physics of earthquakes and faulting.

Previously published in Pure and Applied Geophysics, Volume 176, Issue 9, 2019


1st ed. 2020
  • Englisch
  • Cham
  • |
  • Schweiz
Springer International Publishing
  • Für Beruf und Forschung
  • 25
  • |
  • 25 farbige Abbildungen, 125 s/w Abbildungen, 25 farbige Tabellen
  • |
  • 25 Illustrations, color; 125 Illustrations, black and white; X, 240 p. 150 illus., 25 illus. in color.
  • Höhe: 26 cm
  • |
  • Breite: 19.3 cm
978-3-030-43571-4 (9783030435714)
10.1007/978-3-030-43572-1
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt

Sylvain Barbot is an Assistant Professor at the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, USA, where he conducts research on lithosphere dynamics and the seismic cycle. His current research interests include the micromechanics of friction, the rheology of plastic flow, and crustal deformation. He uses numerical simulations to explain geodetic observations, seismological data, and laboratory measurements. His long-term goal is to understand the mechanics of rock deformation at various time and length scales to explain the earthquake phenomenon.

Physics of Megathrust Earthquakes: Introduction
Energy and Magnitude: A Historical Perspective
A Damped Dynamic Finite Difference Approach for Modeling Static Stress-Strain Fields
Interseismic Coupling and Slow Slip Events on the Cascadia Megathrust
Interseismic Coupling in the Central Nepalese Himalaya: Spatial Correlation with the 2015 Mw 7.9 Gorkha Earthquake
Role of Lower Crust in the Postseismic Deformation of the 2010 Maule Earthquake: Insights from a Model with Power-Law Rheology
Green's Functions for Post-seismic Strain Changes in a Realistic Earth Model and Their Application to the Tohoku-Oki Mw 9.0 Earthquake
Quasi-Dynamic 3D Modeling of the Generation and Afterslip of a Tohoku-oki Earthquake Considering Thermal Pressurization and Frictional Properties of the Shallow Plate Boundary
Effect of Slip-Weakening Distance on Seismic-Aseismic Slip Patterns
Physics-Based Scenario of Earthquake Cycles on the Ventura Thrust System, California: The Effect of Variable Friction and Fault Geometry
Fully Coupled Simulations of Megathrust Earthquakes and Tsunamis in the Japan Trench, Nankai Trough, and Cascadia Subduction Zone
A Secondary Zone of Uplift Due to Megathrust Earthquakes
This topical volume on the physics of megathrust earthquakes investigates many aspects of the earthquake phenomenon, from the geodynamic setting of subduction zones, to interseismic and postseismic deformation, slow-slip events, dynamic rupture, and tsunami generation.
The dynamics of the seismic cycle at megathrusts is rich in various types of earthquakes, many of which only recently discovered. Our early understanding of the earthquake phenomenon was a type of stick-slip motion, where the fault is loaded by tectonic forces for an extended period, followed by rapid failure. Extensive seismic and geodetic monitoring of subduction zones has revealed a much more varied seismic behavior, where episodic fault slip can occur at any slip velocity between the background loading rate, of the order of a few atoms per second, and the fast seismic range, about a meter per second. Events that fill the gap between slow creep and fast ruptures include a host of slow earthquakes. Subduction zones therefore provide a natural laboratory to better understand the physics of earthquakes and faulting.
Previously published in Pure and Applied Geophysics, Volume 176, Issue 9, 2019

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